business beat

Business Beat: Navigating Student Debt as a College Graduate

Apr 20, 2016
Paul Ritz / YouTube

Graduation season is upon us, which means that college graduates across the nation will have to confront the realities of adulthood. Aside from finding careers and gaining overall independence, there’s another huge responsibility that’s facing millions of grads—handling student loan debt. Kara Tabor and Bita Eghbali of the Three Broke Mice podcast chat with Teddy Nykiel of NerdWallet.com about how young adults can overcome the debt hurdle. To learn more about conquering student debt, check...

Zach Heath / Collaboration Cancer

Balancing time and energy can be hard enough if you’re a working student. Zach Heath knows this all too well. He's a University of Missouri MBA student and an entrepreneur launching his own medical company, Hunter Biomedical Group. On top of being a student and startup founder, he’s also a stage-four colon cancer patient. Business Beat’s Siyu Lei and Kara spoke with Zach about his fight for his startup and his health. To hear more of Zach's story, check out the Three Broke Mice podcast here...

miheco / Flickr

In the increasingly health-conscious food market, the use of cage-free eggs is starting to gain some serious traction. After Panera Bread announced its progress on a commitment last November to using cage-free eggs, Hardee’s is the latest restaurant chain pledging to use 100 percent cage-free eggs by 2025. So why are more and more companies jumping in on this trend? Will consumers accept the higher prices of products made from cage-free eggs? KBIA’s Joyce Tao tells the story of how the cage...

Rebecca Greenway/KBIA

This piece was produced in conjunction with Missouri Business Alert , a digital newsroom that provides business news from across the state of Missouri. The Salvation Army’s time-honored red kettle bell fundraiser has captured hearts - and ears - of patrons walking into and out of local grocery and retail stores for years. As a family walks into HyVee , a woman slips change into two children’s hands; the children rush toward the sound of the bell and drop the money into the cherry red bucket....

Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

After the patent on one of the most popular versions of genetically engineered soybeans expired this year, U.S. universities are creating new generic GMO soybean varieties, many of which are designed to guard against specific, local pests. Ninety percent of soybean seeds planted in the U.S. are genetically engineered to withstand herbicides . Often that’s glyphosate, the weed-whacking ingredient in Roundup, developed by the behemoth seed company Monsanto . The glyphosate-resistant trait...

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Close to 60,000 jobs are set to open up in agriculture, food and natural resource sectors each year for the next five years, according to a report from Purdue University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The American agriculture industry has a problem though; there are not enough grads to fill them. The report projects about two open jobs for every qualified graduate. That’s left the USDA, land grant universities and private industry scrambling to try and bridge the gap. When Colorado...

Kamila Jambulatova/KBIA


This piece was produced in conjunction with Missouri Business Alert , a digital newsroom that provides business news from across the state of Missouri. Charisa Slenker sold her first piece of jewelry when she was 15. “I saw a little beading kit at Michaels and I decided I’d want to do that,” Slenker said. “So I bought that and I started making earrings and I would take them to school with me and sell them to my friends and teachers.” In 2009 while studying fashion at Stephens College,...

Samantha Kummerer/KBIA

John Sam Williamson has been a farmer for more than 50 years. He knows his five grain bins stocked with corn and soybeans very well, but he also knows the risks. “There’s a lot of danger to grain bins, but if you use them safely its like other things, gasoline is dangerous, sharp knives are dangerous but if you’re careful and do things safely you should be fine,” Williamson said. One such danger is known as grain entrapment where a worker inside a grain bin is crushed, sometimes to death, by...

Deana Hayes

This piece was produced in conjunction with Missouri Business Alert , a digital newsroom that provides business news from across the state of Missouri. After being diagnosed with HIV 18 years ago, Deana Hayes was so frustrated that she left Missouri. It took her three years to come back and confront the disease. Years after returning to Missouri, she participated in the SnapShots Project where she and other participants told their stories of managing HIV and medication through pictures. Hayes...

Jeremy Schmetterer / KBIA

Personal Energy Transportation International, or PET, built its first rough-terrain transportation device for people with leg disabilities 21 years ago. With 25 affiliate workshops around the country today, the international organization reached the milestone of 50,000 PETs this year. Mel West is a 91-year-old pastor and an antipoverty activist. In 1994, he met Larry Hills, a Methodist missionary who told West about polio and land mine survivors he was helping aide in Zaire, Africa. “As we...

Katherine Hambrick / Missouri Business Alert

This piece was produced in conjunction with Missouri Business Alert , a digital newsroom that provides business news from across the state of Missouri. Billy Martin did not know what to expect before delivering his pitch on Friday, Sept. 18, to a group of judges and fellow entrepreneurs at the Techweek event in Kansas City. As one of 20 finalists for LaunchKC, a business model competition for technology startup firms, Martin and his company Ulytic were about to take the final step before...

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Nilvio Aquino weaves through a tangled jungle of marijuana plants at an indoor grow facility in Denver. “Throw your nose in there. It’s nice and pungent,” he said, pulling a seven-foot tall plant down to nose height at one of the company’s grow facilities. Aquino, the lead grower for Sticky Buds , a chain of marijuana shops in Denver, is in his element among the plants. He’s like a proud gardener showing off blue ribbon varieties, bustling from plant to plant, picking out his favorites. “I’m...

Abby Wendle / Harvest Public Media

In order to grow massive amounts of corn and soybeans, two crops at the center of the U.S. food system, farmers in the Midwest typically apply hundreds of pounds of fertilizer on every acre they farm. This practice allows food companies to produce, and consumers to consume, a lot of relatively cheap food. But that fertilizer can leach through soil and wash off land, polluting our drinking water, destroying our fishing rivers, and turning a Connecticut-sized chunk of the Gulf of Mexico into an...

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

There will be no farm bill until Congress returns in the New Year. But it turns out, dairy prices won’t surge on January 1st as some farm bill supporters have suggested. Harvest Public Media’s Grant Gerlock reports. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack will travel to China this week. It’s a trade visit that happens every year, but this time there is added interest for American farmers. China has rejected 5 loads of corn from the U.S. in recent weeks. The corn contained an insect-resistant trait...

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

Coming up we’ll check in with some farm families about their surprising amount corn crop this year. But first, the Curators of the University of Missouri received a $1.8 million federal grant that will support research related to the production of small nuclear reactors at Ameren’s Callaway County plant in Fulton. MU recently announced its partnership with Ameren Missouri and Westinghouse Electric, Co on this project. Even with the potential job creation, there are negatives to the potential...

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

It’s about that time of year when hog farmers begin the annual process of pumping a year’s worth of manure out of the pits under their barns. The nutrient-rich slurry will fertilize cropland. But there’s an ongoing problem in these pits: a mysterious foam that sometimes forms on the manure. As Harvest Public Media’s Amy Mayer explains, no one quite understands why gases get trapped in the pits, but the foam has been causing explosions. That’s right; this is a story about exploding manure pits...

columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

Columbia City Council members approved stricter requirements for a controversial potential housing development near Rock Bridge Memorial State Park. KBIA’s Kate Grumke reports dozens of residents spoke up about their concerns at Monday’s meeting. This week we’re returning to the issue of nitrates. In our last show, Harvest Public Media's Abbie Fentriss Swanson reported on the health and environmental concerns posed by the nitrates in fertilizer. Officials in Iowa have been asking farmers to...

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

When a group of small farmers in the southeastern U.S. banded together to sue a powerful dairy cooperative a few years ago, many hoped that the case would bring big changes to the milk industry. But the recent settlement of the case involving Kansas City-based Dairy Farmers of America Inc., resulted in little long-term reform, even as the farmers received some monetary damages.

Lukas Udstuen / KBIA

The most recent U.S. census shows the nation’s population is in flux. While some cities across the country are growing, many small towns are dwindling. KBIA’s Lukas Udstuen takes us to Goss, one of the smallest towns in Missouri. You might miss it if it weren’t for a few road signs marking its location along Route 24 in Monroe County. And you’re most likely out of luck if you stop in Goss for directions because the 2010 Census reported the town has zero residents. Check out more details about...

Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

Later, we check in with a revised Environmental Protection Agency standard that could help some wastewater treatment facilities struggling to comply with part of the Clean Water Act’s deadline. But let’s start with another federal agency – the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Every year, more than 9-billion chickens and turkeys are slaughtered, then inspected for defects before heading to market. The USDA is trying to modernize that inspection process, which dates back to 1950s-era poultry law...

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Coming up we’ll take a look at how the drought affected an outdoor industry completely dependent on water. But first, the United States Department of Agriculture is currently accepting claims from female and Hispanic farmers who believe the agency discriminated against them in farm loan or loan servicing programs. As Harvest Public Media’s Amy Mayer reports, the claims process is complex—but the payouts could be large. If you couldn’t tell by the long-lasting triple digit temperatures last...

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

This story on the American beef industry is part of a special reporting series from Harvest Public Media. Check out the rest of their stories at harvestpublicmedia.org . When Allen Berry brought his 11 yearlings to the Green City Livestock Market in central Missouri last month, he paid into a fund that at first blush, seems a bargain. Berry paid $11 into the Beef Checkoff, a mandatory government program that gets $1 each time an animal is sold on its way to the slaughter house. Berry...

Program teaches financial lessons to foster care youth

Dec 27, 2012
Money
File Photo / KBIA

Foster care can be difficult for many reasons: stress on the family, forced assimilation into a new environment for the child and a lack of resources can create problems for those in the system. But what you don’t always hear about is what happens to the kids who age out of the system at 18. These teenagers are often thrown into an adult world with adult problems, including how to make ends meet. But, one St. Louis foundation is helping teach the former foster children the financial lessons...

images_of_money / Flickr

Had a hamburger lately? The cow it came from likely passed through a feedlot – a huge farm that fattens cattle before they’re slaughtered. The thousands of cattle housed at a feedlot produce tons and tons of waste. That manure can be used as a valuable fertilizer. But if it’s not properly disposed, it could lead to an environmental disaster. In Day 4 of Harvest Public Media’s series, America’s Big Beef, Jeremy Bernfeld reports. Foster care can be difficult for many reasons: Stress on the...

Pat Blank / Iowa Public Radio

Now that Thanksgiving has passed, many people have begun to deck the halls, gorge on delectable dishes, and send out greeting cards. Well, that last one might become trickier for some rural residents soon. That’s because the United States Postal Service is moving ahead to reduce the hours of thousands of post offices across the country. Jennifer Davidson has this report from a rural Ozarks community. Another holiday tradition for many families is a road trip to pick up a Christmas tree. In...

Rural post offices prepare for reduction of hours

Nov 28, 2012
Jennifer Davidson / KSMU

A tiny post office sits in Pomona, Mo. It’s a very small, white plaster concrete building with a flagpole to the side. Pomona is in a rural area in south central Missouri. This is one of the many post offices across the United States in an effort to save money by the US Postal Service. “I think all of the smaller offices in this area—they’re all going to that, because, you know, there’s a lot of lag time,” says Anna Carnefix, the postmaster relief for the Pomona office. And she’s right –...

Pat Blank / Iowa Public Radio

In the Dr. Seuss book, it was the Grinch who stole Christmas. But for some Midwest tree growers, it may be the drought that eventually steals the holiday. Danny Moulds, who owns Kris Kringle’s Trees just north of Cedar Falls, Iowa, said the hot dry summer took a harsh toll on newly planted seedlings. “We did lose about 15,000 Christmas trees in a 46-acre farm,” Moulds said. “And with the fir trees we didn’t lose just the little ones we planted this year, we (also) lost last year’s.” Still,...

Holiday season yields more volunteering in Columbia

Nov 16, 2012
Yiqian Zhang / KBIA

With the holidays quickly approaching, people are busier than ever trying to help feed others in need during the holiday season.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

By most accounts, Missouri is a pink state. Not red. Not blue. Pink. But, when thousands of small business owners in Missouri were asked which candidate was more supportive of small business, 35 percent chose President Barack Obama, 24 percent picked Gov. Mitt Romney, and 41 percent said they were unsure. (That’s from a recent George Washington University and Thumbtack poll .) To learn more, I jetted up to Moberly to visit a small business owner and get his perspective. What issues matter...

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Countdown to Election Day is upon us. And while business development continues to surge as a hot topic this campaign season, the expired farm bill seems to have disappeared off candidates' radars completely. Harvest Public Media’s Amy Mayer has this report on just how much candidates are talking farm policy...in farm country. By most accounts, Missouri is a pink state. Not red. Not blue. Pink. But, when one hundred small business owners in Missouri were asked which candidate was more...

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