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The parent company of the supermarket chain Schnucks wants a federal court to dismiss two lawsuits related to a security breach of customer credit and debit cards.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the two lawsuits seek class-action status. Schnucks said in dismissal motions that the plaintiffs didn't have standing to sue and couldn't prove they suffered any harm.

One suit was filed in U.S. District Court in Chicago, while the other in was filed U.S. District Court in St. Louis.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

A Columbia biotech company has announced plans to commercialize its products around the globe.  EternoGen, LLC. develops collagen-based products for minimally invasive surgical procedures.  KBIA’s Ben Wilson has more on the company’s expansion.

The Columbia City Council recently voted in favor of purchasing 16 natural gas-powered vehicles along with building a natural gas fueling station in northeast Columbia. KBIA’s Rickelle Pimentel tells us why some community members aren’t as excited about this decision.

Archair Aviator / Flickr

The Columbia Regional Airport Advisory Board met Wednesday afternoon in the north terminal conference room to discuss ongoing projects and the new location of future meetings.

The airport manager Don Elliot reviewed two airport projects which are almost complete. The new taxi pavement project will be completed in the next few days after inspection and the new fencing around the runways will be completed in September.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • Mo. revenue up 10 percent for 2013 budget year
  • Mo. AG says state may have to use gas chamber
  • Police step up patrols on DWI and other violations for holiday week
Amy Loves Yah / flickr

The Columbia-based company, EternoGen, LLC  announced plans to enter the commercialization phase for its regenerative medical devices. The company said today it plans to open new offices in St. Louis and Stockholm.

New media law angers journalists in Ecuador

Jun 27, 2013
Dolores Ochoa / Associated Press

Ecuador’s government made international news for two actions recently. The country's foreign minister met with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange at its London embassy. Assange took refuge in Ecuador’s embassy to avoid extradition to Sweden, where he faces questioning for alleged sexual assaults.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

Our neighboring city of Independence, Mo., is going green with its lighting over the few years. 

At the 81st annual meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors in Las Vegas last past weekend, Independence announced its plans to partner with Philips Lighting on an energy and maintenance saving project.

401(K) 2013 / Flickr

 

In the next 50 years, Missouri and the rest of the country will see a historic amount of money getting passed down through inheritance

Lawsuits filed by the Missouri Attorney General's office against three companies that provide phone services have been settled, and their customers in Missouri will receive nearly $300,000 in refunds.

The companies were accused of engaging in a practice called "cramming."  Joe Bindbeutel, chief of the Attorney General's Consumer Protection Division, says cramming occurs when a phone company levies unauthorized charges onto its customers' monthly bills.

KBIA

Entrepreneurs in Columbia might get a boost from a program being designed to help business startups.

The Columbia City Council last week allocated $150,000 to Regional Economic Development Inc., or REDI, with an original goal of providing loans for new small businesses.

But REDI is instead working with the University of Missouri and the Small Business and Technology Development Center to devise a program that would do more than simply provide loans.

File / KBIA

A proposal from the city of Columbia to enforce occupancy limits for rental properties is angering local real estate agents.

Crop insurance is a big part of the farm bill debate in Washington this year. The Senate recently passed a bill that would expand the heavily subsidized program. And now the House is zeroing in on the issue. Several amendments to the farm bill pending in the House would curb how much the government provides to cut the cost farmers pay for crop insurance. But, premiums aren’t the only part of the system supported by tax payers. Crop insurance companies also enjoy lots of government largess. Harvest Public Media’s Frank Morris reports.

Jennifer Davidson / KSMU

Four-year-old Jack Sander is picking up puzzle pieces in his living room. For a four-year-old, he’s got it pretty good:  loving parents, a beautiful home on a golf course, a little brother, and some pretty cool toys. But there’s one thing he’s never been able to do.

“Jack has never been able to even try to go to the movies before,” says Dawn Sander, his mother.

“He’s so sensory-seeking—he can’t sit still now—that there’s no way he could go to an hour-and-a-half movie, where the lights are off, and you sit still, and you don’t talk, with the noise very loud,” Sander says.

zombieite / Flickr

The mayors of Hallsville and Centralia, along with one Missouri legislator, have reached out to gun and ammunition manufacturers in an effort to attract those businesses as other states tighten gun restrictions.

State Representative Caleb Rowden said the decision to reach out to gun businesses is about improving the economy.

“This is a matter of jobs,” Rowden said. “If this was a different industry where it was so public that it made national news that these companies need relieving, I would have sent the same letter with some different bullet points.”

Governor Jay Nixon (D) says Boeing will expand its operations in St. Louis County.

The Governor made the announcement during a trade mission in Western Europe.  He told reporters via conference call that Boeing will add a new technology information center to its campus in St. Louis County.  Both Nixon and Boeing officials were in attendance this week at the International Paris Air Show in France.

Andrew Magill / Flickr

The multi-billion dollar makeover of the greater downtown Kansas City area over the past decade was intended in part to draw businesses, but census figures show the area has lost nearly 20 percent of its private employees in that period.

Indeed, the Kansas City Star reports that U.S. Census data from 2001 to 2011 show that greater downtown lost more than 16,000 jobs.

That decade covers the period from shortly before the downtown redevelopment boom began to just after the major redevelopment projects, such as the Kansas City Power and Light District, were completed.

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

Drought conditions in much of the country have eased, but the Great Plains region is still in rough shape. Last year’s dryness pushed the nation’s cattle herd to its lowest numbers since the 1950s. Dry conditions this summer could cause the herd to dwindle even further. As Harvest Public Media's Luke Runyon reports from Colorado, that means beef prices are on the rise this summer just in time for grilling season.

ensign_beedrill / Flickr

  The talk around STEM employment (jobs in the fields of science, technology, math and engineering) has largely circled around jobs that require a great deal of education.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

On this week's Business Beat: 47 million Americans are enrolled in the SNAP program, or food stamps, including nearly 16 percent of Missourians.  SNAP is the biggest spending item in the farm bill. And the program has a big bulls eye on it as Congress debates new legislation. As Grant Gerlock reports for Harvest Public Media, the economic considerations go beyond who receives SNAP benefits to how and where the money is spent.

Revenue collections in Missouri slowed a bit last month, but continued their overall upward trend.

From July of 2012 through the end of May, the state took in $7.3 billion in revenues, an increase of 10.4 percent from May of 2012.  The year-to-date increase from April of this year, though, was 11.2 percent.  Missouri Budget Director Linda Luebbering blames it on a drop in sales tax collections.

"People are still a little bit concerned about spending a lot of money, given the economy and the uncertainty at the national level," Luebbering said.

Andrew Nichols / KBIA

The Columbia City Council approved a plan Monday to improve traffic flow along Providence Road near Stadium Boulevard in the city’s Grasslands neighborhood.

In cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation, the city will remove the traffic signal at Providence and Rollins Street and will add new traffic signals on Providence at Turner Avenue and at Burnam Road. 

dbking / Flickr

For the second time in two years, Lambert Airport in St. Louis is cleaning up after a storm caused significant damage to Missouri's largest airport.

Strong storms, including tornadoes, ripped through the St. Louis region Friday night. The store caused extensive damage to two aircraft hangars, three buildings and a parking lot. Repair costs have not been determined.

On April 22, 2011, a strong tornado hit Lambert, significantly damaging a terminal and knocking out dozens of windows. Total damage was $25 million.

Wong Maye-E / Associated Press

The collapse of a factory in Bangladesh that killed more than a thousand workers caused a flurry of outrage and widespread calls for sweatshop reforms. But so did the fire four months earlier that killed more than a hundred workers at another Bangladesh garment factory.

Express Scripts to expand to Joplin, creates 100 jobs

May 30, 2013
pasa47 / Flickr

 St. Louis-based Fortune 100-company Express Scripts says it will build a new patient-service call center in Joplin, creating 100 new jobs.

Express Scripts is a pharmacy benefits company that manages more than a billion prescriptions each year for millions of patients in the U.S.

Gov. Jay Nixon announced Thursday that the company’s new patient-service center will mean a 960,000 dollars investment in Joplin's economy.

The state of Missouri provided economic incentives to Express Scripts as part of its expansion in Joplin.

Ron Dauphin / Flickr

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. has pleaded guilty in Missouri to violating the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act by failing to properly handle pesticides that had been returned by customers at its stores across the country.

St louis
paparutzi / Flickr

St. Louis aldermen have taken a step toward merging economic strategies with surrounding St. Louis County, a move that would pave the way for more cooperation between the two governments.

The Board of Aldermen last week endorsed a merger of economic development agencies. And the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the board is expected to take a final vote in early June.

Dozens of Ste. Genevieve County residents met last night (Tuesday) with the company applying to open up a sand mine in their neighborhood. Locals fired questions at Mark Rust, owner of Summit Proppants, for four hours about health concerns, traffic safety and property values.

Missouri voters will get the chance to consider a constitutional amendment next fall that would affirm the rights of farmers to engage in modern farming and ranching practices. The state House and Senate passed the measure during the end of the legislative session last week. Harvest Public Media reports.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Dozens of Ste. Genevieve County residents met Tuesday night with the company applying to open up a sand mine in their neighborhood. Locals fired questions at Mark Rust, owner of Summit Proppants, for four hours about the mine’s potential impact on the community.

The biggest points of contention between locals and the company included regulation on air and water quality, the 50 semis traveling in and out of the facility daily, the possible decrease in property value and a guarantee that the company would only operate during the day.

American airlines
Simon_sees / Flickr

The City of Columbia announced today that no money will come out of the Air Service Revenue Guarantee fund for the month of April. This is the second month in a row which American Airlines did not require a payment from the fund.

rustinpc / flickr

With a new farm bill, farmers may have access to fewer dollars for conservation. For 27 years, the popular Conservation Reserve Program has transformed small parcels of land, contributing to cleaner water, more habitat for migrating birds and less soil erosion. But as Harvest Public Media’s Amy Mayer reports from Iowa, the program has been enrolling fewer acres in recent years and it’s not just budget cuts that could make it smaller still.

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