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Tim Patterson / Flickr

Missouri added about 6,000 jobs in April as its seasonally adjusted unemployment rate edged down slightly.

Figures released Tuesday by the state Department of Economic Development also show that Missouri added more jobs in March than originally thought. The March job growth was revised upward from 4,800 to 6,800 new jobs.

Missouri's unemployment rate declined one-tenth of a percentage point in April to 7.3 percent. The department said that is the lowest level in 40 months.

The national unemployment rate was 8.1 percent in April.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

The minority business advocacy group MOKAN says the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District is not doing enough to include local minority and female workers in its sewer upgrade projects.

MOKAN executive director Yaphett El-Amin says her group wants MSD to increase the transparency of its hiring practices and invest at least $23.5 million in worker training programs.

Workers in the Office of Emergency Management for Boone County are expressing surprise about the elimination of its Management Director position.

Business Beat: Costly Wind Gusts for Farmers

May 9, 2012
NET News

This week: Farmers looking to have a record book corn harvest. Plus, find out how wind gusts can cost farmers a ton of money.

NET News

For many Midwesterners, wind is an occasional nuisance. For farmers, though, the wind’s impact can be huge — drying out crops and eroding topsoil. Gusts big and small also complicate the application of chemicals, and that can be particularly costly.

In 2005, Columbia stockbroker Alex LaBrunerie placed a very long-distance cold call.

Columbia paper shows circulation, revenue increase

May 7, 2012

The report the Audit Bureau of Circulations released earlier this week shows increase in papers’ revenues throughout the country.

Missouri House members approved legislation trimming taxes on businesses.

Jeremy Bernfeld / Harvest Public Media

This week: Harvest Public Media takes an in depth look into rural commodity brokers, and the tug of war battle between MF Global and rural farmers, and a look back on the store Cool Stuff.

Rural brokers pick up pieces after MF Global crisis

May 2, 2012
Jeremy Bernfeld / Harvest Public Media

When futures trading firm MF Global went bankrupt at the end of October, regulators discovered $1.6 billion in customer funds missing, much of it belonging to Midwest farmers and ranchers. But MF Global clients aren’t the only ones hurting in farm country.

Kirksville shows most growth in northeast Missouri

Apr 27, 2012
Jeffrey Beall / flickr

Kirksville led northeast Missouri in job postings over the last few months thanks in part to the Northeast Regional Medical Center, based in Kirksville.

Kirksville grocery store shuts down

Apr 27, 2012
kirksville
david_shane / flickr

A locally-owned Kirksville grocery store is closing.  Near and Far Downtown Grocery sells produce from local farmers to stock its shelves. Velda Salt opened the store with her husband after having success at the farmer’s market. But she says the college town environment, and its seasonal nature, made it tough to be profitable year-round.

“More than half of our clientele are students," said Salt. "But it’s not just the students, because when school is out the professors are gone, a lot of them. The community…overall the town decreases.”

Judge upholds minimum wage ballot summary

Apr 26, 2012

A judge upheld the language of a proposed ballot initiative Thursday that, if passed, would raise the state minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to $8.25. Kansas City Restaurant Owner Victor Allred challenged the initiative, claiming the language was unfair. But Cole County Circuit Judge rejected his challenge. Missouri Jobs for Justice is the group supporting the initiative, and will turn in the signatures to the Missouri Attorney General next week. 

Eva Dou / KBIA

This week: Columbia’s biggest export to China isn’t corn, soybeans, or any manufactured product.  It’s scrap metal.  In fact trade experts are calling Columbia’s export “waste and scrap.” Plus, find out how one farmer is still shifting through the aftermath after losing hundreds of acres of farmland.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

Scott Olson is getting ready to plant corn and soybeans, but he wonders if anything will grow.

 

Missouri lawmakers are aiming to attract large economic development projects with a new type of incentive modeled on a strategy used elsewhere.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

Columbia could be the next city in Missouri to bring natural gas fuel to residents.

Flickr / Natalie Maynor

The new bus route that goes from the M-U student center to the Columbia Farmers Market has yet to attract many passengers.

Eva Dou / KBIA

At this scrap yard in north Columbia, it’s easy to think the piles of rusty metal and old machine parts are, well, just junk.

But these broken motors and tangled copper wire are actually one of Missouri’s biggest links to China. China may be a hot target these days for U.S. manufacturers looking for a market to sell their products, but the fastest growing American export to China last year was actually what trade experts call “waste and scrap.”

MayTag Square / Flickr

Shoppers have a few days to save a few dollars on appliances bought in Missouri, thanks to temporary state tax break.

Trying to keep rural towns alive

Apr 19, 2012
WenDee Rowe LaPlant / Kansas Sampler Foundation

This week on the show, people in rural areas are trying to figure out how to keep youth – and jobs – in their areas. Plus, college graduates could have a better opportunity getting a job than graduates have in the past.

Trying to keep rural towns alive

Apr 19, 2012
WenDee Rowe LaPlant / Kansas Sampler Foundation

This week on the show, people in rural areas are trying to figure out how to keep youth – and jobs – in their areas. Plus, college graduates could have a better opportunity getting a job than graduates have in the past.

Rural America is fighting for its survival

Apr 18, 2012
WenDee Rowe LaPlant / Kansas Sampler Foundation

The 2010 Census found that the share of people in rural areas over the past decade fell to 16 percent, passing the previous low of 20 percent in 2000. The rural population is aging, and young people are moving away.

Missouri added about 4,800 jobs in March as its unemployment rate remained steady.

The head of a Columbia Chamber of Commerce task force trying to find ways to improve air travel in Mid-Missouri says it will consider a smaller hotel tax increase, now that a larger one has appeared to stall. Greg Steinhoff says hotel owners in Columbia weren’t thrilled with the idea of a 3 percent increase to the hotel tax, with the proceeds to be used for airport upgrades. But now that an organization representing those owners has said it would support a 1 percent hotel tax increase, Steinhoff says his task force will try to figure out how far that money would go.

Council to discuss Westwood Avenue trees issue

Apr 16, 2012

The Columbia City Council will review the removal of trees on Westwood Avenue tonight.

Business Beat: Railroad Looking to Roll Again

Apr 11, 2012
Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

This week: Find out how one community is going back in time to move businesses forward.  Plus, what dairy farmers want more protection in the 2012 Farm Bill.

Railroad Looking to Roll Again

Apr 11, 2012
Dean Borg / Harvest Public Media

It’s been seven years since folks around Forest City, Iowa, have heard a train whistle on the nearby tracks. But Iowa Northern locomotives will soon be switching railcars alongside the towering grain silos at the town’s co-op elevator.

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