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Dale Muckerman / flikr

The kitschy and iconic downtown Columbia store Cool Stuff is closing its doors after 23 years in business. Owner Arnie Fagan, an MU alum, opened the store in 1988 as a tie-dye shop.

Courtesy Department of Homeland Security

The White House budget for 2013 provides no construction funding for a planned livestock disease lab in Kansas and calls for a “comprehensive assessment of the project in 2012” to consider “the cost, safety, and any alternatives to the current plan.”

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

JefferyTurner / Flickr

 

The number of foreclosures in Missouri jumped nearly 14 percent in January compared to the month before. Meanwhile, foreclosures were up only 3 percent nationwide.

Val Vennet / Google Images

A Fulton developer could break ground this spring on a biodiesel production plant. 

The Columbia Regional Airport is under new leadership. 

Business Beat: February 15, 2012

Feb 15, 2012
Courtesy Department of Homeland Security

This week: State representatives agree Missouri needs to find better ways to get more jobs in Missouri. Plus, how a disease laboratory in Kansas has citizens worried.

Kansas political leaders and top officials at Kansas State University are united in support of a plan to bring the nation's premier agricultural disease laboratory to the K-State campus. But many people remain uneasy about bringing dangerous pathogens into the nation’s heartland -- pathogens that could devastate the livestock industry and possibly harm humans as well.

File / KBIA

University of Missouri students, city officials and MU’s transit consultant will visit Ames, Iowa to look at their public transportation system on Friday (Feb. 17).

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

KOMUnews / Flickr

The nonprofit group Keep Columbia Safe donated almost three thousand dollars for a camera upgrade at the intersection of 10th and Cherry in Columbia.

Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

Across the corn belt, more farmers are putting up their own grain bins —giant, metal cylindrical storage silos.  In the past year alone, farmers nationwide have added some 300 million bushels of on-farm storage, up 2 percent from the previous year.

Business Beat: February 8, 2012

Feb 8, 2012
Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

This week: Farmers buying up grain bins to help play the market. Plus, how refineries in Kansas and Iowa could help find another source of bio fuel.

Eric Durban / Harvest Public Media

Corn has been the engine behind the ethanol industry for years, and that food vs. fuel debate doesn't look to end anytime soon.  But as researchers work to unlock the biofuels potential in crop residue and other biomass, a refinery is being built in Kansas may help take the industry to another level.

Attorney General's Office

The state of Missouri has filed criminal charges against a shuttered Georgia company accused of using fake signatures on phony foreclosure documents.

A Boone County grand jury on Friday issued a 136-count criminal indictment alleging forgery against DocX and its former president, Lorraine Brown. The company closed in 2010 amid criticism of mortgage companies signing legal documents not reviewed by its employees in a practice called robo-signing.

Adeliepenguin / Dreamstime

Missouri Department of Transportation Director Kevin Keith says making I-70 a toll road would allow for expansion of the interstate and would be a first for Missouri.

Flickr

Ameren Missouri has filed a proposed plan with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission following a November citation for property being too close or physically on Ameren’s project boundaries. The proposal could affect over 1,600 waterfront homes, many of which are in Camdenton.

Matt Veto / KBIA

A Thursday morning fire in Boonville has destroyed two businesses operated by a program that helps people with disabilities.

The Heart of Missouri United Way voted last week to adopt a new strategy that will focus future funding on programs that address poverty and other issues with at-risk children.

Jay Buffington / Wikimedia Commons

According to Forbes, Columbia, Missouri is one of the top places to move to for a working retirement in the United States.

Jacob Fenston / Harvest Public Media

This week:  KBIA talks with William Barrett of Forbes on how the city of Columbia is in the top twenty places in the U.S. to come for a working retirement.  Plus, Missouri farmers are trying to protect themselves from "agritourism."

highway
Dreamstime

The head of the Missouri Department of Transportation says charging tolls on Interstate 70 is the only real option for funding reconstruction of the highway, if the state wants to do something about it right now. 

Technology and hands-on computer skills are important assets for most job seekers in today’s economy.

This week: KBIA spoke with a director of the center of Agro Forestry at the University of Missouri on why the state isn't using biomass as a renewable energy source. Plus, one company is hiring people with degrees you wouldn't expect.

Mike Matthes / City of Columbia website

A proposed tax increase on hotel rooms could help finance improvements to the Columbia Regional Airport, according to Columbia City Manager Mike Matthes.

Missouri casino operators say they should not be solely responsible for boosting funding to state-operated veterans' homes.

Missouri House members have suggested adding $1 to the $2 per-patron entrance fee that casinos already pay the state. Gov. Jay Nixon's administration has said the fresh revenue could provide a dedicated funding source for the seven existing veterans' homes and possibly pay for one more.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

Zensmom1 / Flickr

Perhaps the most well-known and obvious reminder of the tornado that devastated Joplin in May is about to come down.

File photo / KBIA

Ameren Missouri is pledging to increase its energy efficiency programs starting in 2013.  If the plan is approved, it would allow Ameren to provide 145 million dollars in energy efficiency rebates over three years – a cost that would be passed on to consumers.

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

The Food and Drug Administration is publishing an order this month that limits the way farmers can use certain antibiotics to treat animals, and eggs.

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