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Five of your immigration questions, answered

Oct 26, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

To see the latest story of "How The Deck is Stacked," our series with Frontline and PBS NewsHour on the battle over immigration and how it's changing the job landscape across the state of Washington, click here.

What Volkswagen-Audi owners are supposed to do now

Oct 26, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about a federal judge's decision to approve Volkswagen's $15 billion settlement for its rigged diesel cars;  Apple's 4 percent stock decline; and the growing popularity of Accountable Care Organizations, groups where health providers look after their patients and the costs of that care.

What to do with the VW albatross in your garage

Oct 26, 2016
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Annie Baxter

A U.S. judge has approved a $14.7 billion settlement with Volkswagen AG over its diesel emissions cheating scandal. 

Last year, the company admitted that it had rigged its diesel vehicles with software to cheat emissions tests. The settlement offers remedies for about half a million drivers of affected 2-liter vehicles, which include several model years of the VW Beetle, Golf, Jetta, Passat and Audi A3.

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D Gorenstein

Since the introduction of Obamacare, a growing number of physicians are part of what are called Accountable Care Organizations, where physicians, nurses and other providers are responsible for the health of their patients and the costs of that care.

The shifting landscape is rearranging incentives, and leading doctors into corners of their work they’ve rarely visited.

On a late Friday afternoon last month, the Family Health Associates practice in Charleston, West Virginia is empty.

Empty except for Dr. Julie DeTemple and her staff.

Marketplace Tech for Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Oct 26, 2016
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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll talk about a slip in iPhone sales for Apple; the danger of internet-connected devices; and the possibility of "social hacking" during this election.

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Kim Adams

The big news in healthcare today is about Obamacare. The federal government says premiums for 2017 for some of the more popular plans in the program will go up an average of 25 percent. The healthcare exchange is having a rough time of it — insurance companies keep pulling out, and healthy young people the system needs aren't opting in quickly enough. Here's a look at how we got here, and what it might take to move forward.

Marketplace for Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Oct 25, 2016
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Marketplace

Two things that are about to get more expensive: World Series tickets and Obamacare premiums, but there's a little more to it than that. Plus: another installment of our election series "How the Deck is Stacked," looking at the immigrants employed by agriculture and tech in Washington state.

Video game actors are on strike

Oct 25, 2016
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Tony Wagner

More than 350 actors picketed Electronic Arts' offices in Playa Vista, Calif. yesterday, striking for higher pay and better working conditions for video game work.

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Emma Jacobs

On Monday, the French government began dismantling the refugee encampment known as “The Jungle” in the French port city of Calais. Adjoining the main highway to the Port of Calais, the field in an industrial zone has been a stopping point for migrants hoping to find a way across the English Channel to the U.K.

Despite years of attempts to eliminate the camp, the French government recently estimated its population at 6,500, proof of enduring attraction of the U.K. over France for many migrants.

The world has reached a milestone on renewable energy

Oct 25, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about news that renewable energy has surpassed coal as the largest source of power capacity; efforts from private companies and local governments to improve infrastructure; and a startup that plans to produce bike locks that will make thieves vomit if they try to steal your vehicle. 

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David Brancaccio

A super PAC with an allegiance to Donald Trump has been courting Pennsylvania's Amish community.

The Amish, who embrace simple living and reject modern conveniences, have historically been supportive of Republicans. But Trump isn't a conventional Republican nominee, said the Economist Magazine's Rosemarie Ward

Ward was recently in Amish Country near Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She joined us to talk about the group's political leanings and how they might perceive Trump. 

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Kim Adams

The National Basketball Association will, this season, become the first professional sports league to offer a regular schedule of live games delivered in virtual reality. At least one NBA League Pass game per week will be live-streamed in virtual reality. The move could be a big deal for the NBA and other sports. What is the technology involved?

How YouTube became YouTube, told with YouTube videos

Oct 24, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

Remember how Larry Page and Sergey Brin started Google in a garage? That garage belonged to Susan Wojcicki. The Palo Alto native eventually became Google's 16th employee. She ran Google's AdSense program for years and was then tapped to run YouTube, the video-sharing website that Google bought in 2006.

Girl Scout cookie cereal is coming next year

Oct 24, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

This needs to be filed under "Too Much of a Good Thing."

General Mills is teaming up with the Girl Scouts to turn Girl Scout cookies into breakfast cereal. We know there will be a Thin Mint variety, as well as Caramel Crunch, which seem to be based on Samoas.

It's hitting shelves come January 2017.

Doctors cut costs by getting to know their patients

Oct 24, 2016
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D Gorenstein

The healthcare landscape is changing, even as Obamacare bumps along.

In the past six years, we’ve seen the rise of Accountable Care Organizations, now numbering more than 800, where doctors or hospitals work together to streamline care. For physicians that means they now get some compensation through contracts that reward improving health and controlling costs, as opposed to simply making money for every service provided regardless of the outcome or expense.

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Donna Tam

Bob Dylan, who won the Nobel Prize for Literature earlier this month but has yet to acknowledge the honor publicly, will have to give a lecture in order to receive the nearly $1 million purse attached to the prize.

The rise of Paramount Pictures and anti-trust regulation

Oct 24, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about anti-trust concerns surrounding the AT&T-Time Warner merger, along with similarities between the deal and the rise of Paramount Pictures. Plus, we'll look at the price increases for presidential TV ads in swing states. 

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David Brancaccio

It became official over the weekend: AT&T wants to buy Time Warner for $85.4 billion. Time Warner's properties include Warner Bros. movie studio, HBO, CNN and DC Comics, among others. 

The deal between AT&T (a company that distributes content) and Time Warner (a company that makes content) echoes a trend already underway in the industry.

Will Visa’s recent PayPal partnership stoke its earnings?

Oct 24, 2016
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Nancy Marshall-Genzer

Visa reports earnings Monday, and we'll see results for the first full quarter of its partnership with PayPal. Previously, PayPal actively steered its users away from using Visa to avoid the fees Visa charged on every purchase. Now Visa is getting those fees, and something more strategically important — an entry to the booming, and millennial-friendly, mobile payment space.

Big tobacco could get bigger

Oct 21, 2016
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Mitchell Hartman

British American Tobacco (BAT) has offered to purchase the remaining 58-percent stake in Reynolds American it doesn't already own for $47 billion. That would bring together brands like Dunhill, Kent, Lucky Strike on the BAT side, with U.S. powerhouse brands Newport and Camel from Reynolds.

My Economy: Making an old dream a reality

Oct 21, 2016
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Vincent Smith

We usually like to see how the economy is doing by measuring statistics like GDP, but those broad measures don't always reflect everyone's experience. That's why we've collected stories from people all over the country for a segment we call "My Economy." Here's our latest story.

Wendey Waggoner is a single mom of three working as a social worker in Georgetown, Indiana. Waggoner had a comfortable life when she was married to an attorney, but when they divorced her lifestyle changed dramatically. Now she has to stretch her paycheck to support her sons.

Washington DC has figured out a way around money bail

Oct 21, 2016
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Sabri Ben-Achour

In most of the country, if you're arrested for something there's a chance you'll be asked to pay money bail to get out of jail until your court date. Estimates vary, but tens and possibly hundreds of thousands of people end up staying in jail only because they can't afford bail.

But not everywhere.

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Andy Uhler

According to the Puerto Rican Federal Affairs Administration, roughly 1000 Puerto Rican families are moving to Florida every month. Things are pretty bad on the island right now, as the government tries to deal with billions of dollars of crushing debt. Unemployment’s at 12 percent and almost half of all families are living under the poverty line there. Cities like Orlando have had to rapidly respond to those families’ needs – and that means business and job opportunities.

The British pound's drop to a historic low

Oct 21, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about the British pound's 19-percent decline since the Brexit vote; Starbucks' big push into China; and how California's state fire agency uses social media to try and save lives. 

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Scott Cohn

Wildfires are an unfortunate fact of life in California, and a five-year drought is only making matters worse. Since the beginning of this year, more than 5,300 fires have broken out in the state. That is a 16 percent jump from a year ago.

Starbucks doubles down on China

Oct 21, 2016
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Reema Khrais

Starbucks named executive Belinda Wong as its first CEO for China this week, and said it plans to have 5,000 stores in the country by 2021. With a middle class that is already larger than the population of the United States, China could be Starbucks' growth engine of the future.  

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

Will honey bees stay sweet on North Dakota?

Oct 21, 2016
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Annie Baxter

It might seem surprising that North Dakota, one of the northernmost and coldest states in the nation, is the bees’ knees for honey production.

It produces more honey than any other state. In summertime, North Dakota's climate is just right. It's conducive to flowers’ production of nectar, which bees use to make honey.

“Warm days and cool nights are optimal for nectar secretion for a number of plants that honeybees visit. So that helps,” said Mark Sperry, owner of Sperry Apiaries in Kindred, North Dakota.

If you can't pay bail, aren't you unfairly incarcerated?

Oct 20, 2016
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Sabri Ben-Achour

Does bail discriminate?

There are around 450,000 Americans in jail who haven't been convicted of a crime. How many of them are there because they are poor is hotly contested and varies from place to place. Data from Los Angeles suggest it's 14 percent there. A New Jersey study from 2013 put the number at 39 percent, advocates say it's higher. By any measure it's tens of thousands of people on any given day.

Soon, the house next door could be a rental

Oct 20, 2016
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Mitchell Hartman

According to ATTOM Data Solutions’ Single-Family Rental Market Report for Q3 2016, approximately 25 percent of single-family homes in the U.S. are owned by investors and rented out, rather than occupied by their owners.

ATTOM senior vice president Daren Blomquist said that purchases of properties in 2015 were even more investor-driven, with approximately one-third of single-family homes being purchased by investors.

Let's do the numbers... on the debt

Oct 20, 2016
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Nancy Marshall-Genzer

The thing about numbers:  you can slice and dice them to support whatever point you’re trying to make.  Politicians are especially good at that.

When University of Georgia economist William Lastrapes sees this, he just shakes his head.

“When politicians start talking about the federal government debt, it’s very easy to talk about the big numbers," he said. "But you need to keep those numbers in perspective.”

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