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Missouri gas stations will not be selling E-15 anytime soon.

A joint House-Senate committee voted Wednesday to reject a rule change sought by the State Agriculture Department that would have allowed sales of fuel containing 15 percent ethanol. Republican Senator Eric Schmitt of St. Louis County chairs the committee and said its vote had nothing to do with its opinion on increasing ethanol use in Missouri.

Macon airport reopens with new runway

Oct 9, 2013
http://aeroexperience.blogspot.com/

Macon’s Fower Memorial Airport reopened after being closed for five months for the construction of a new runway. City Administrator Allan Muncy said the improvement to the airport is very important because of what a big role the airport plays to the city.

The new runway is made of concrete and is 900 feet longer than the old one. The runway will support a new jet-fuel fueling system the airport recently added and allow bigger planes to fly into the airport, like the type that small businesses own.

Missouri home to the cheapest gas in the country

Oct 7, 2013
jcarlosn / Flickr

Missouri drivers are paying less at the pump than drivers in any other state right now. Missouri is currently home to the cheapest gas in the nation with the average gas price in the state at $3.05 per gallon.

A look at Bloomberg News

Oct 3, 2013
Mark Lennihan / Associated Press

While many news organizations are reducing their international operations, Bloomberg News is expanding. Bloomberg News now has nearly 200 news bureaus in 72 countries. 

monsanto
stevecadman / Flickr

 

Monsanto says its financial loss widened in the agribusiness giant's fiscal fourth quarter as sales of biotech seeds dropped.

jefferson city
localozarkian / flickr

Jefferson City based company RR Donnelley laid off close to 500 employees Tuesday after announcing the layoff in August.

Rusty_1 / Flickr

“30 Rock” fans know the phrase well: Shut it down.

Nearly all of the characters have used it at some point during the TV show’s multi season run. And now it’s echoed in real life as the federal government has gone into shutdown mode. This week we take a look at how the shutdown has affecting mid-Missouri.

Atomic Taco / Flickr

St. Louis-based Enterprise Holdings, the nation's largest rental car company, plans to hire 11,000 new full-time workers by the middle of next year.

The hiring is expected to be complete by July 31, and could boost the company's workforce to more than 80,000, depending on attrition.

The company plans to hire nearly 8,500 for management trainee positions, including many recent college graduates. Others will be hired for positions in information technology, administration and support roles at the company headquarters in suburban St. Louis, and in branch stores.

United Way of Callaway County

A record set at one Callaway County homeless shelter could reflect a bigger problem.

Wiley House, a shelter for homeless adult men and women, had a record number of individuals stay overnight in July and August. Executive Director Brad Sheppard said the shelter has seen an increase every year since it opened in 2009, but he still didn’t expect such high numbers.

jbezdek / Flickr

Business owners in Sedalia say the city’s smoking ban is having an impact on their businesses. The ban, that went into effect one month ago, bans smoking inside restaurants and bars within city limits – private clubs are exempted from the ban.

At last week’s city council meeting, Sedalia council members heard from local business owners expressing concerns. Michael Gross is general manager at The Endzone Bar and Grill. He said employees are feeling the impact of the ban, which has led to changes in revenue.

St. Louis Arch
paparutzi / Flickr

Competition between St. Louis and Chicago isn't anything new, given the long disdain between Cardinals and Cubs baseball fans. But the rivalry is now extending into a new playing field.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources has postponed its decision on issuing a permit for a proposed frac sand mine in Ste. Genevieve County.

The department’s Land Reclamation Commission voted Thursday to table its decision for two weeks so it can determine if the mine’s location would violate a federal non-discrimination act.

Columbia has fastest growing economy in Missouri

Sep 27, 2013
10th and Elm in downtown Columbia
KBIA File Photo / KBIA

The US Bureau of Economic Analysis issued rankings showing Columbia as the fastest growing economy in Missouri.

Jonesburg receives grant

Sep 26, 2013

In April, CertainTeed Corporation, which has 60 plants across the nation, chose Jonesburg, Mo., to build an asphalt roofing shingle manufacturing and distribution facility.

The small town of Jonesburg, with just more than 700 residents, is receiving major help in developing the infrastructure to support the new facility

The White House announced in a press release that the U.S. Department of Commerce is giving $1.9 million to Jonesburg.

City Administrator Gerard Ritter said this grant will keep the project process running smoothly.  

A miscalculation by Brookside apartments is costing some Columbia residents up to $35 per week.  The Downtown Leadership Council hosted a public forum Tuesday to discuss parking issues in Columbia. One full time downtown worker says he has to pay for parking daily now because Brookside residents are taking up all the free spots. Council members say Brookside estimated 25 percent of their residents would bring cars to Columbia.

Columbia Leadership Council discusses Brookside parking overflow

Sep 25, 2013
Feifei Lei / KBIA

A miscalculation by Brookside apartments is costing some Columbia residents up to $35 per week. 

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri businesses could face significantly higher costs for workers' compensation insurance next year.

The National Council on Compensation Insurance projects Missouri insurers will see an 11.6 percent increase in their claim costs in 2014.

This increase is driven partly by a new Missouri law that seeks to shore up the Second Injury Fund, which is for disabled workers who suffer additional on-the-job injuries. The law shifts some types of claims out of that fund and into traditional workers' compensation insurance.

A tavern built around 1830 that was the first stopping point in the frontier days for those going west from Columbia is moving.

supplemental nutrition assistance program
Selbe B / flickr

The U.S. House of Representatives has voted to cut $40 billion from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, and some Missouri social welfare advocates are concerned about the impact of the cut on rural Missourians. SNAP, formerly food stamps, was already expected to receive a fund cut this November.

Residents of Jefferson City continue to voice their concerns with the City Council’s proposal for a new conference center.

The Council held its second public hearing on Thursday, to listen to comments on two existing proposals.

The proposals came from two different local companies, the Farmers Holding Company and the Erdhardt Hotels Group.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

It’s about that time of year when hog farmers begin the annual process of pumping a year’s worth of manure out of the pits under their barns. The nutrient-rich slurry will fertilize cropland. But there’s an ongoing problem in these pits: a mysterious foam that sometimes forms on the manure. As Harvest Public Media’s Amy Mayer explains, no one quite understands why gases get trapped in the pits, but the foam has been causing explosions. That’s right; this is a story about exploding manure pits.

Scott Pham / KBIA

  This week the Como Explained team goes to Startup Weekend, the premier event for Columbia's booming (really!) tech scene:


Scott Pham / KBIA

  

  Startups are an important part of any community, but they’re especially important for a city that’s adding population, but shedding jobs in sectors like manufacturing. Businesses that are being built now could be the badly needed employers of the future.

Ameren Missouri is finishing up plans to clean up property it owns in downtown Columbia that is contaminated by gas plant tars, which can contain carcinogens.

The property is in the North Village Arts District, which is attracting commercial and residential development.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports Ameren's fact sheet on the cleanup says it will remove about 36,000 tons of contaminated soil but the utility has not determined where the soil would be dumped.

New veterans' court opens

Sep 9, 2013
World War I Veterans
File Photo / KBIA

A veterans' treatment court is now up and running for Missouri's 13th Circuit, which includes Boone and Callaway counties.

The Veterans United Foundation has given 100-thousand dollars to operate the court, which deals only with cases involving veterans. Clayton VanNurden is the court's administrator.  He says having a single court for veterans will give them the opportunity to undergo treatment programs with other veterans.

thisisbossi / Flickr

Security checks at the Kansas City International Airport apparently will be quicker soon for some passengers.

The Transportation Security Agency announced Thursday that KCI will be among 60 U.S. airports that will install its PreCheck expedited screening program, beginning Oct. 1.

The expedited screening allows qualified passengers to avoid removing shoes, belt and outerwear such as a jacket. They also won't have to remove laptops or quart-sized plastic bag for gels, liquids and aerosols from their luggage.

401 (K) 2013 / FLICKR

State officials say a market shift is behind the recent decline in real-estate related tax credits redeemed by Missouri businesses and individuals.

The state Revenue Department reports a $103 million overall annual decline in tax credits cashed in the fiscal year that ended in June. That includes a $55 million plunge in the historic preservation tax credit and another $20 million drop in the low-income housing credit.

columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

Columbia City Council members approved stricter requirements for a controversial potential housing development near Rock Bridge Memorial State Park. KBIA’s Kate Grumke reports dozens of residents spoke up about their concerns at Monday’s meeting.

columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

Columbia City Council members amended and approved stricter requirements for a controversial potential housing development near Rock Bridge Memorial State Park.

The tougher ordinances affect the amount of impervious surfaces the new development is allowed to have.  Impervious surfaces are surfaces such as streets or sidewalks that reduce the amount of water that soaks into the ground. The changes come on the heels of dozens of water concerns community members voiced about the project.

Kirksville Regional Airport gets new director

Sep 4, 2013
kirksville regional airport
City of Kirksville

Kirksville Regional Airport’s new director Glenn Balliew began his new job last week.

Balliew retired from the U.S. Army after most recently working as a deputy assistant commander in Fort Rucker, Ala. He has worked in the private airline industry for more than five years.

One of the challenges that Balliew will face at the smaller airport is attracting private and corporate flights to Kirksville. Balliew said that the number of planes at the Kirksville airport has been cut in half over the years, and bringing in business is difficult.

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