There is agreement on both the political left and right that a majority of college professors in the United States are liberal or left-of-center. But do liberals stifle free speech — particularly that of political and social conservatives — on college campuses?


Our focus this week is on China and the restrictions it places on the media inside the country, and how it affects not only journalists but Internet users. From the Great Firewall to denying visas to critical foreign journalists, what is the future of freedom of expression in the world’s most populous country?

Censorship in Turkey

Oct 23, 2014
turkey protest
Emrah Gurel / AP Photo

  After 11 years as prime minister, Recip Tayyip Erdogan became Turkey's first directly-elected president in August. Under Erdogan’s tenure, Turkey’s economy has grown significantly. The country’s main minority group, the Kurds, have gained new rights. And a military with a history of meddling in politics has been kept in its barracks. But press freedom groups like Reporters Without Borders and the Committee to Protect Journalists have consistently criticized efforts by Erdogan’s AK Party to limit freedom of expression and of the press.

Bao fan / AP Images

Blogs and microblogs are the primary sources of independent news in China.