cerner

This is the fifth story in a series from the Health & Wealth desk on Healthy Nevada. 

All this week we’ve been talking about the population health experiment that the health technology company Cerner is conducting in the town of Nevada, Missouri. But there are still a lot of unanswered questions. Will Cerner’s message and grassroots approach resonate with people in this rural community? Can small changes like new playground equipment and a community garden really have an impact on Nevada’s poor health rankings? And, more simply, will this program work?

To help forecast what may come from Cerner’s efforts in Nevada, I spoke with Dr. Keith Mueller, the Director of the Rural Policy Research Institute at the Center for Rural Health Policy Analysis. 

This is the third story in a series from the Health & Wealth desk on Healthy Nevada

Dr. Kristi Crymes is a family medicine doctor at the Nevada Medical Clinic. Crymes came up from Springfield three years ago to work in Vernon County, which has some of the state’s poorest health rankings. In 2010 the obesity rate in Vernon County was 30 percent. The incidence of adult diabetes has hung around 11 percent for the past 3 years. 

This is the first story in a series from the Health & Wealth desk on Healthy Nevada

Pookie Decocq is the healthy living coordinator for the YMCA in Nevada, Missouri. She’s also the town’s official Pickleball Ambassador, which is a team sport played with two wooden paddles, a whiffleball and a low net, like ping pong or badminton.

Pookie’s dream is to hold a pickleball tournament here in this rural town in southwest Missouri. But the average Nevada resident isn’t exactly the picture of health. Like a lot of small rural towns in the state, Nevada has very high rates of obesity and heart disease. Its diabetes rates are some of the highest in the country at 11 percent.

Cerner, one of the largest employers in Kansas City, announced Thursday afternoon it intends to purchase about 237 acres at the site of the former Bannister Mall, which it hopes to use to build a new campus to house thousands of new employees.

The University of Missouri Health system has received $13.3 million in federal grant funding for a program that will combine high-tech and on-site primary-care initiatives in healthcare, according to a statement released by the university today.

The so-called LIGHT program is designed to create a specialized workforce in primary care as well as designing enhanced medical records to help patients and healthcare providers better manage care.

The technology component of the program involves a partnership between the Kansas City-based Cerner Corporation and MU.

Folks in the western Missouri city of Nevada are getting the chance to make examples of themselves when it comes to health and wellness.

The town is embarking on an initiative to improve the health of its citizens and the quality of health care they receive.

The Kansas City-based health care technology company Cerner is teaming up with local officials on the initiative. The city's hospital will spend $10 million on an electronic medical records system that will allow information to be shared with the town's two dozen doctors and medical experts in bigger cities.