chemical weapons

European Press Agency

In April, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's air force dropped bombs containing sarin nerve gas on a rebel area in northern Syria. Around 100 people were killed and hundreds more injured, including a number of children.

The slaughter highlighted the renewed threat of chemical and biological weapons. Both Assad's forces and rebel groups have used chemical weapons in Syria, demonstrating the dangers of proliferation. Meanwhile new gene editing technologies allow for the creation of more virulent and deadly bio-weapons.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the history and future of chemical and biological weapons.


Manu Brabo / Associated Press

 

As the United States considers military action in Syria, the country remains the most lethal place in the world for journalists. The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) reported that 15 journalists are currently missing in Syria. Charles Lister, an analyst at HIS Jane’s Terrorism and Insurgency Centre, told Vice on Saturday that in recent weeks there has been a discernible spike in reported kidnappings in northern Syria.