Christianity

Updated at 11:10 p.m. ET

A video has emerged that purports to show militants of the self-declared Islamic State beheading 21 Egyptian Christians kidnapped last week in Libya.

Reuters reports: "In the video, militants in black marched the captives, dressed in orange jump suits, to a beach. They were forced down onto their knees, then beheaded."

Reuters says a caption on the five-minute video reads: "The people of the cross, followers of the hostile Egyptian church."

The Fayette R-III School District will be making several changes to its school policy after a lawsuit from a national organization. The American Humanist Association settled a lawsuit with the school district regarding alleged violations of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment.

Kellie Moore, ColumbiaFAVS.com

Christianity is in the midst of a major shift, according the scholar and author Phyllis Tickle. And that shift could involve making more room for the Holy Spirit.

Tickle, respected internationally as an authority on religion, is the founding editor of the religion department at “Publishers Weekly.” She is the author of more than two dozen books, and has received awards for her accomplishments, along with two honorary doctorate degrees.

She spoke at an event on Friday and Saturday in Columbia focused on one question: “What is the future of faith?”

Kellie Moore, ColumbiaFAVS.com

 

It’s a chilly Thursday at noon, and there are 4 of us gathered in a tiny chapel on College Avenue for a mid-day service. I’m observing as Father John Prenger leads two other people through liturgy.

There are Bible readings, some responses from the Book of Common prayer, and a short message. 

When it’s time for holy communion, they gather around the altar. From one person to the next, they pass a tiny piece of bread, and a small chalice of wine. But it’s not just the bread and wine – to them, the body and blood of Jesus Christ are present. 

What comes after death in the Abrahamic faiths?

Oct 12, 2013
Katy Mersmann, Columbia Faith & Values

  When Rashed Nizam went home to Bangladesh this spring, he knew his father was close to death.

“All his life he was healthy,” Nizam said. But now, he was 90 years old. When Nizam got there, he could tell his father’s last moment was coming – he just didn’t know exactly when.

He prepared his family: “I said, ‘OK, you recite Quran, you say all the good, things, reminding him.’”

Two days later, on May 1, his father died.

Kellie Kotraba/ColumbiaFAVS / KBIA

In this week's faith and values update, we hear from Kelsey Gillespy, the Catholic writer for Columbia Faith and values. She just finished a made-at-home documentary called "This Little Light," which aims to dispel misconceptions about Christianity – some of which she used to have herself, even though she grew up Christian.