clay masters

Clay Masters / Harvest Public Media

This week, we’ll hear about efforts to manage the Missouri River.

Clay Masters / Harvest Public Media

Along a vast stretch of the Missouri River, the floodwaters that ravished homes, businesses and farms last year are not a distant memory.

Calm before the corn

May 30, 2012
Clay Masters / Iowa Public Radio

Corn has been good to farmers. Helping fuel a boom in the ag sector. And as this year’s record corn forecast indicates, Midwestern farmers can’t seem to plant enough of the grain. Even with concerns growing about the effectiveness of today’s high-tech genetically engineered seeds, farmers aren’t backing down.

Clay Masters / Iowa Public Radio

This week on the show: Columbia’s City Manager talks about the direction of the local economy. Plus, farmers continue to plant corn despite failing efforts to combat rootworm.

Technology and hands-on computer skills are important assets for most job seekers in today’s economy.

This week: KBIA spoke with a director of the center of Agro Forestry at the University of Missouri on why the state isn't using biomass as a renewable energy source. Plus, one company is hiring people with degrees you wouldn't expect.

Vaughn Hammond / UNL Extension

This week:  Harvest Public Media speaks with a University of Nebraska Educator who just returned from Afghanistan where he helped teach Afghanis farming techniques, and the FDA is looking to change the way Cephalosporins are used for animals.  

Photo courtesy University of Illinois / Read more: http://bulletin.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=1569

This week: Rootworm is causing a headache for some farmers who thought they already had a fix for that problem. Plus, a university of Missouri study takes a look at the impact economic strains have on middle class families.

Remaking school lunches

Dec 8, 2011
Clay Masters / Harvest Public Media

This week on the show: your child's school lunches aren't likely to get much healthier anytime soon. Plus: why you should still get the flu vaccine.

Hilary Stohs-Krause / NET

Two roads diverge in the U.S. beef industry. Americans are buying more alternatively raised meat — organic, natural, grass-fed and the like – but most large-scale cattle producers in the Midwest are not cashing in on the trend.

By Clay Masters.

Hilary Stohs-Krause / NET

Demand for ‘alternatively raised meat’ seems like an opportunity for farmers in the Midwest. But it’s not a booming industry in the region just yet. Plus, an update on the effort to bring broadband internet to rural areas of Missouri.