off the clock

Rayland Baxter isn’t a household name in music… at least not yet. But those who have heard of the Nashville-native know him to be a world-class singer-songwriter. Baxter stopped in Columbia just two weeks ago to perform at Rose Music Hall during a Midwest tour of his second studio album titled “Imaginary man”.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of AXA Equitable, 2012

Every year, busloads of fourth graders from around the state of Missouri are dropped off in Jefferson City and taken through the State Capitol. All of those grade schoolers are brought into the House Lounge where the walls are covered with Thomas Hart Benton’s “Social History of Missouri” mural.

Off the Clock - HungerU Makes a Trip to the Midwest

Oct 16, 2015
Emma Nicolas/ KBIA

  There are more than 795 million people hungry globally according to the Global Food Security Index. HungerU is trying to change that. Its large tour bus treks from campus to campus getting college students involved in the fight to stop hunger.

HungerU’s huge blue and black trailer has visited more than 65 college campuses across the U.S. since its mission first started three years ago. This year will be the group’s seventh tour, and first time visiting the Midwest.

Riley Beggin/ KBIA

Pulitzer-prize winning historian David McCullough spoke Wednesday evening at the Missouri Theatre on the lessons to be learned from the founding fathers. McCullough’s lecture marked the opening of the Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy, which supports the study of the American democratic tradition at MU.

McCullough has written biographies on historical figures like John Adams, Harry Truman, Theodore Roosevelt and—most recently—the Wright Brothers. In addition to his Pulitzers, he has been awarded the National Book Award and the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Off the Clock: New Ownership, New Changes at Columbia's Blue Note

Mar 27, 2015
Tyler Adkisson / KBIA

Other than the Missouri Theatre — the Blue Note and Rose Music Hall, formerly known as Mojo’s — are two of the most established concert venues in not only Columbia, but in Mid-Missouri.

For the past 34 years, the venues grew up and flourished under the supervision of one person — Richard King. However, at the tail end of last year, King sold the spaces to the owners of the Majestic Theatre in Madison, Wisconsin. While the sale wasn’t necessarily unexpected, it did prompt many venue-goers to wonder what would happen to the cherished institution — mostly — what changes, if any, would be visible.

Jenn Cooper / KBIA

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment Off the Clock, KBIA producer Jenn Cooper hangs out with Tao Weilundemo, the owner of Maya Creek, sustainable living commune in Calwood, Mo.

I-70 Sign Show

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment Off the Clock, KBIA producer Jenn Cooper hangs out with Anne 

Thompson, the creator and curator I-70 Sign Show, a yearlong contemporary arts project.

Roxana Pop / KBIA

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment Off the Clock, KBIA producer Meredith Turk hangs out in rodeo culture with this year’s Miss Teen Rodeo queen, and finds out why she’s one of the only rodeo competitors you’ll ever see wearing a helmet … and she wears it well.

Tom Harris and Brian Mahieu

Tom Harris and Brian Mahieu have been engaged for nine years. Each wears a wedding ring. Each says they consider themselves married emotionally.

However, their opportunities to get legally married have been limited. Even though nearby Iowa has allowed same-sex marriage since 2009, Harris and Mahieu were afraid to drive north to get married.

"[We] realized pretty quick that that's nice, but when we come back to Missouri, nothing has changed," Harris said.

Growing up in ragtime: musician Johnny Maddox

Jun 14, 2013
Andrew Nichols / KBIA

Famous ragtime pianist Johnny Maddox visited Columbia this week as the guest of honor at the Blind Boone Ragtime Festival.  In the height of his career in the 1950s, Maddox performed with names like Patsy Cline and released the first all-piano record to sell over 1 million copies.    With millions of albums sold and more than 60 years working in the music industry, many ragtime fans would call Maddox a legend.   

Lee Jian Chung / KBIA

This week: A volunteer in Columbia is using video games as an opportunity to teach kids about math, science and technology. Plus, the fourth installment of My Farm Roots, a series from Harvest Public Media in which we hear Americans’ stories and memories of rural life.

When author Pamay Bassey suffered the loss of two family members and the end of  a relationship she embarked on a unique journey – she visited a different place of worship, every week, for a year, in search of guidance.

That experience became a book called My 52 Weeks of Worship, Lessons from a Global, Spiritual, Interfaith Journey.

Kristin Torres, reporting for KBIA and the Columbia Faith and Values desk, spoke to Bassey, before her appearance in St. Louis this weekend.

My Farm Roots: Just taking notes

Aug 3, 2012
Donna Vestal / Harvest Public Media

Sometimes farm roots don’t blossom into a farm life.

But those memories can still have a huge influence, perhaps even determining a career choice.

That’s the case for Tom Karst, a soft-spoken, well-respected journalist who’s been covering the fruit and vegetable industry for more than 25 years.

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

It’s not every day that a trip to the drug store can change your destiny.

For 20-year-old Nan Arnold, it was a day in 1956 in Ashland, a small, dusty dot on the open range of western Kansas near the Oklahoma border.

Nan had landed her first job as a music teacher at the Ashland school just a year before. She lived with the store’s owner because her parents thought she was too young to live alone.  

Edgar Ailor III / Iniversity of Missouri Press

The call of the open road has long beckoned Americans … and in 1978, William Least Heat-Moon answered the call and embarked on a drive around the country, taking the roads less travelled. Starting in Columbia, he followed a circular route that totaled nearly 14,000 miles. The result was Blue Highways, a New York Times Bestselling book.

Andrea Silenzi / Harvest Public Media

This is the first installment of My Farm Roots, Harvest Public Media’s new series chronicling Americans’ connection to the land.

Kate Edwards hasn’t always been a farmer. No, she came back to the farm after college, grad school and a stint as an environmental engineer.

Now, she farms a small one-acre plot near Solon, Iowa. On her small farm, she feeds 30 families through a Community Supported Agriculture project, a CSA. Edwards was drawn back to farming, she says, because of family memories.

Staying or going: 'My Life, My Town' in Glasgow

Jul 13, 2012
Lizz Cardwell / KBIA/Columbia Missourian

A high school senior, Madelyne cheerleads, serves as the Glasgow FFA President, and participates in Band and Choir. On the weekends, she works at the local bank. She cannot wait to leave the small-town life and the farm.

Elizabeth Trovall/Grant Hindsley / KBIA/Columbia Missourian

On this week's edition of "Off the Clock," we hear a third portrait from the “My Life, My Town” series that documents the stories of teens in rural Missouri. Today  we visit Trinity Rainey in Macon.

KBIA and the Columbia Missourian have been working with rural teens all over Missouri to get their stories about … being a teen, in rural Missouri. Called “My Life My Town,” the project worked with teens to create multimedia portraits about their lives. Over the last few weeks, we’ve heard the audio versions of these portraits on “Off the Clock."

Off the Clock: Faith and Fiestas in Mexico, MO.

Jun 29, 2012
Lydia Mulvaney and Andrew Schriver / KBIA/Columbia Missourian

On this edition of Off the Clock, we visit Monica Martinez, a teen whose Latin American family is putting down roots in Mexico, Missouri.

KBIA and the Columbia Missourian have been working with rural teens all over Missouri to get their stories about … being a teen, in rural Missouri. Called “My Life My Town,” the project worked with teens to create multimedia portraits about their lives – some of the teens where a pink triangle, some of them camouflage or a tiara. Over the next few weeks, we’ll hear the audio versions of these portraits on “Off the Clock."

Katie Currid / KBIA/Columbia Missourian

On this week’s show: It’s summer. We’ll look at stories about playing croquet in Mexico (Missouri, that is), gardening in Columbia (Missouri, also) and life as a teen in a small town.

Columbia Art League

This week we take a look at a new spin on an old sport, the debut of a new alcohol policy in Jefferson City and a weekend long art show in Columbia.

Words Travel: Author Ibtisam Barakat talks about her latest project, a children’s story for the Arab world, and beyond.

Ibtisam Barakat is a Palestinian writer who lives in Columbia Missouri and participates in many international writing and arts programs.