concealed carry permits

A new bill could mean new responsibilities for teachers

Oct 24, 2014
Gregory Wild Smith via Flickr

Due to a new Missouri law, teachers could be taking on a new responsibility.

Senate Bill 656 allows school districts to appoint staff members in the district to carry a concealed weapon for protection in case of an emergency. Only members of the district's Board of Education will know the names of these select individuals. The district must then notify the director of the department of Public Safety who these individuals are.

This law is not a required to be implemented in each district. It is strictly a district by district decision.

Hand Guns
File Photo / KBIA

A City Council committee in Kansas City has endorsed a measure that would ban people from openly carrying firearms in the city limits.

The Kansas City Star reports Mayor Sly James has pushed for the ban, noting that the tourist town of Lake Ozark also has voted for a similar prohibition, even by those with concealed carry permits.

The council's Public Safety Committee on Wednesday endorsed the ban, which will go before the full City Council on July 31.

gun
~Steve Z~ / flickr

Missouri lawmakers have given final approval to legislation that could allow specially trained teachers and other school personnel to carry concealed weapons.

Supporters say the measure would protect schools from intruders, but opponents say it could compromise safety by having firearms in classrooms.

The bill sent to Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon on Friday would also lower the minimum age required to get a concealed weapons permit to 19 from 21. The House voted 111-28 in favor of the bill. It cleared the Senate a day earlier.

gun
Drab Mayko / FLICKR

Some of the state's smallest counties aren't prepared to issue concealed-carry permits even though a law giving them that responsibility took effect last week.

The Southeast Missourian reports that the holdup is occurring in small third-class counties. Bollinger County Sheriff Darin Shell says small counties like his are waiting to receive grant money from the Missouri Sheriff's Association to purchase software that allows them to issue the permits.