constitutional amendment

farm
isnapshot / flickr

Opponents of Missouri’s Right to Farm bill filed suit against the state regarding the ballot language in the proposed constitutional amendment.

The amendment passed during the primary elections by 2,375 votes. A recount, the fourth in the past two decades in Missouri, affirmed the original result of the election.

Leslie Holloway, the director for regulatory affairs at the Missouri Farm Bureau, said the language in the ballot is consistent with other constitutional amendments.

USDA

Many farmers own guns. Yet the right to bear arms fared better than the right to farm in Missouri's recent elections.

Voters approved a constitutional amendment enhancing gun rights by 61 percent of the vote. A constitutional amendment creating a right to farm got just 50.1 percent support.

There was a general city-country divide. The gun and farm measures fared better in rural areas than in bigger cities.

Yet the reason for the closer margin on the farming amendment wasn't solely because of weaker support for it in suburban St. Louis and Kansas City.

Agriculture is a cornerstone of the Midwest economy. In some states, it may even become a right.

That's what unofficially happened in Missouri on Tuesday when voters approved the so-called "right to farm" in the form of an amendment to the state Constitution. (With less than a half of a percent vote differential, a recount is likely.) And the controversial provision could be a model for Constitutional additions in other big ag states.

Of the five proposed constitutional amendments Missourians will get to vote on in August, two of them have generated little attention and virtually no controversy.  One would expand the right against unreasonable search and seizures to include electronic communications and data, while the other would create a new Missouri lottery ticket to fund the needs of veterans.

Gregory Wild Smith via Flickr

Missouri lawmakers have given final approval to a proposed amendment to the state Constitution intended to strengthen the right to bear arms.

The Republican-led Senate voted 23-8 on Wednesday to send the bill to the November ballot. The proposal passed the House a day earlier with a 122-31 vote.

The amendment would define the right to bear arms as "unalienable" and require the state to defend against any "infringement" of that right. It would also include defending one's "family" with a firearm as a guaranteed constitutional right.

KBIA File Photo

 

The Missouri House has endorsed a pair of early voting measures, though some Democrats contend they could create confusion for a proposed initiative petition that seeks to go further in allowing advanced voting.

House members gave first-round approval Wednesday to a constitutional amendment and companion bill. It would allow early voting for nine days, ending the week before state and federal elections. Polls would be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the week and four hours on Saturday. There will not be early voting on Sunday.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

A debate on state funding for bicycle paths caused legislation to impose a one-cent tax increase to be set aside in the Missouri House.

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

Missouri's House has endorsed a proposed amendment to the state Constitution that would enshrine a fundamental right for parents to raise their children as they see fit.

Missouri Capitol
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri governors would be barred from making budget cuts to schools under a proposed constitutional amendment passed by the Senate.

File Photo / KBIA

The Missouri House has passed legislation that would require voters to show photo identification at polling places.

Missouri prosecutors are organizing a campaign on behalf of a proposed constitutional amendment they say will help convict people who commit repeated sex offenses against children.

computer keyboard
Remko van Dokkum / Flickr

A Missouri Senate committee is considering whether to extend constitutional protections against unreasonable search and seizure to electronics.

USDA

The Missouri House and Senate have passed a proposed constitutional amendment that would guarantee farmers and ranchers the right to farm and ranch using "modern methods."

gun
Drab Mayko / FLICKR

A Missouri House committee has advanced a proposed constitutional amendment aimed at protecting gun rights.

The amendment approved on Tuesday would define the right to bear arms as "unalienable" and require the state to defend against any "infringement" of that right. It would also include defending one's "family" with a firearm as a guaranteed constitutional right.

Sponsoring Republican Sen. Kurt Schaefer, of Columbia, says the legislation would protect against proposed gun control laws at the state and federal level.

Eric Durban / Harvest Public Media

The Missouri Senate has passed a proposed constitutional amendment that would guarantee farmers' rights.

The legislation originally would have barred voters from passing initiatives that would infringe on farmers' rights. But that portion was removed after opposition from senators concerned about blocking the petition process.

File / KBIA

The Missouri House has passed a bill that would amend the term limits law passed by state voters in 1992. 

Cows at MU Farm
File Photo / KBIA

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to a measure that supporters say will help protect farmers.
The proposed state constitutional amendment would prohibit laws that limit what it calls modern farming and ranching practices unless they're passed by the Legislature. The measure would add that the right to engage in modern farming and ranching practices are "forever guaranteed."

House members endorsed the measure Wednesday. It needs another vote before moving to the state Senate. If it passes the Legislature, the amendment would go to a statewide vote.

Support dwindles for Amendment 3

Oct 3, 2012
Kyle Stokes / KBIA

A Missouri ballot measure proposing to change how judges are appointed is losing support. Amendment 3’s supporters say they don’t like the summary that will appear on the ballot.

Amendment 3 will show up on Missouri ballots come Nov. 6, but its supporters say they’re not happy with what voters will read about it.

Secretary of State Robin Carnahan wrote the summary of the amendment for the ballot, but supporters say the summary is misleading and filed suit.

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

A Missouri appeals court panel has upheld the ballot summary for a proposed constitutional amendment that would change the process for selecting appellate judges.

In its ruling Monday, a three-judge panel of the Western District Court of Appeals certified the summary that voters will see on the November ballot.

Newscast for January 20, 2012

Jan 20, 2012

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Missouri's first female chancellor is Cheryl B. Schrader
  • House passes budget caps
  • Missouri tries to tax cigarettes
  • Medicinal cannabis activists arrested

 

 

Missouri senators are proposing a state constitutional amendment that would double the size of the Conservation Commission and make it geographically diverse.

The commission oversees the Department of Conservation which is currently made up of four members, with no more than two from the same political party. Members are appointed by the governor and confirmed by the state Senate.

The proposed change in the state Constitution would expand the commission to eight members and require that they be from different areas of Missouri.

Marshall Griffin / St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee has passed a proposed constitutional amendment that would place caps on all state spending.