cuba

AP Photo

Colombia’s government and negotiators from the FARC guerrilla group spent four years negotiating a peace agreement backed by the U.N., Cuba and the U.S.

President Juan Manuel Santos even won the Nobel Peace Prize for the effort.

Then Colombian voters narrowly rejected the pact, sowing doubt about the prospects for ending a 52-year civil war that’s killed a quarter of a million people.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at what how the government and the FARC might piece a deal back together again.


Photo courtesy of the Office of Gov. Jay Nixon

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon will be leading a trade delegation on a trip to Cuba next week.

Chucho Valdes: The KBIA Interview

Nov 2, 2015
Dr. Mamadou Badiane

Cuban pianist Chucho Valdes pays a return visit to Columbia this Wednesday. KBIA's Trevor Harris interviewed Valdes last week. They discussed what the end of the embargo (or 'blockade' if you're Cuban) means for cultural exchanges and the influence of Valdes' legendary Cuban supergroup Irakere more than 40 years after the ensemble hit the stage.

(This post was last updated at 10:45 a.m. ET.)

After 54 years of animosity, the United States and Cuba have formally restored diplomatic ties.

That means that the U.S. opened an embassy in Havana and Cuba opened an embassy in Washington, D.C., this morning.

A New Cuba?

May 7, 2015
Desmond Boylan / AP

After more than 50 years of hostility and frozen ties with the United States, Cuba is preparing to open up to the world. In this edition of Global Journalist, we look at what it’s like reporting in the Communist country, and what the restoration of diplomatic relations means for Cuba's economy and people.

This week's guests:

Kristofor Husted / KBIA/Harvest Public Media

When President Obama announced late last year that he would work toward ending the embargo on trade with Cuba, it wasn't just tourists perking up their ears. Midwest farmers and ranchers see communist Cuba as an untapped market for goods from the American Heartland. Harvest Public Media's Kristofor Husted reports on how agriculture interests are looking to cash in.


Kristofor Husted / KBIA/Harvest Public Media

When President Obama announced in late 2014 that he would work toward ending the embargo on trade with Cuba, it wasn’t just tourists perking up their ears. Midwest farmers and ranchers see communist Cuba as an untapped market for goods from the American Heartland.

One of those farmers is Paul Combs, a rice farmer from southeast Missouri. Cuba can be an important market for farmers like Combs, who already depend on exporting their products.

“We’re excited about normalized relations with Cuba,” Combs said. “Until 1963, Cuba was the biggest market for U.S. rice.”


McCaskill Joins Nixon in Calling for Trade with Cuba

Feb 23, 2015
Claire McCaskill
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Senator Clair McCaskill is pushing for a repeal of the trade embargo on Cuba.

McCaskill put out a press release Monday arguing Cuba would be a good market for Missouri farmers and ranchers.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon made it official Thursday when he announced that he'll be leading an agricultural trade mission to Cuba in March.

Updated at 2:39 p.m. ET

President Obama announced today the most significant change in U.S. policy toward Cuba in more than 50 years, paving the way for the normalization of relations and the opening of a U.S. Embassy in Havana.

Obama said "we will end an outdated approach that for decades has failed to advance our interests and instead we will begin to normalize relations between our two countries."

Franklin Reyes / AP Images

World leaders from five continents gathered in Caracas on Friday to pay their last respects for Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez. The Venezuelan leader held the country's presidency from 1999 until his death earlier this week.

In a seaside town just east of Havana, there’s an old colonial house where writers, artists and volunteers have been publishing handmade books for nearly three decades. This publishing collective calls itself Ediciones Vigia, or the Watchtower Editions.

Reporting in Cuba

Feb 2, 2012

Being an independent news reporter in Cuba is a dangerous occupation. The Committee to Protect Journalists points out that Cuba was once tied with China for holding the largest number of journalists behind bars.