data

Talking Politics: Data in elections

Oct 27, 2014
Kyle Stokes / KBIA

This week two Missouri political consultants joined the show to talk about how campaigns in Missouri utilize data. John Hancock, a Republican, is starting a Super PAC that will focus on micro-targeting voters through consumer data in 2016.  Patrick Lynn, a Democrat, is a consultant with Show Me Victories.  Hancock and Lynn discussed the advantages of this new method of voter targeting.

KBIA file photo

Football fans can expect an enhanced mobile experience while attending future games at Faurot Field. To support the growing demand of wireless devices and services, AT&T expanded its mobile internet coverage in the stadium. AT&T upgraded the Distributed Antenna System, known as DAS, during the off season. Sports fan Kelly Hurrell said she has noticed the improvements.

"I remember last year the first season we were at the stadium you wouldn’t be able to get calls in and out very easily or text messages in and out very easily, but now it's no big deal at all," Hurrell said.

It's not often St. Louis sees nearly a foot of snow in a 24-hour period, but it has happened a handful of times since records have been kept. The National Weather Service reported 10.8 inches Sunday at Lambert Airport.

April was a good month for legislators hoping to receive freebies from lobbyists, showing a sharp uptick from the previous month in gifts, according to the most recent lobbyist disclosures.

The grand total for gifts so far is $619,157. Once again, the vast majority (75%) of the gifts for this month were to groups and committees instead of individual legislators. As we've detailed before, it's a practice that hides the true recipient of the gift.

Nice restaurants in Jefferson City should be sad to see the Missouri Legislative session end. They’ve received tens of thousands of dollars worth of business from lobbyists courting Missouri’s legislators over dinners and drinks.

Who were the legislators taken out for expensive meals? Well, in many cases, we don’t really know.

Not just a red state

Feb 7, 2012
WNYC

Missouri is by all accounts  a "red state"  but it's plain to see that one or two colors can't tell the whole story.  How can one color, one category, make sense of the diversity of communities we see around us every day?  The folks at Patchwork Nation and the public radio station WNYC think they have a better way: they look at voters in each county and then slice up the numbers 12 different ways.  Some counties are what might be called, the "Monied 'Burbs."  Others are "Tractor Countries" or "Mormon Outposts."   12 demographics, 12 sets of values, opinions and personalities.