disease

Sara Pang / KBIA

Dr. Robert Gallo is the biomedical researcher who unearthed HIV as the cause of AIDS and was the first to identify a human retrovirus known to cause human cancer. Gallo’s discoveries don’t just stop there; his current research includes finding a prevention for the disease despite the challenges.

Camels are known for their ability to travel long distances across the desert without water.

But they’re also becoming an increasingly important source of milk for people in drought-prone regions. That includes East African countries like Kenya, where camel numbers have skyrocketed over the past few decades.

But introducing camels — or any species — to a new region, could mean bringing in new diseases.

Laura Siegler / Harvest Public Media

In Manhattan, Kan., the site of National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility is still just a huge hole in the ground nearly a year after the initial ground-breaking.

But there has been some progress. In December, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which will operate the huge animal disease lab if it is ever completed, got title to the land when the city of Manhattan officially deeded over the 47-acre site. It’s a move that supporters hope will breathe new life into the beleaguered lab.

stoneystone68 / Flickr

On this week's show, we'll hear about how the drought is affecting Missouri's deer population, and hear a profile from the Harvest Public Media series My Farm Roots.

Armed Forces Pest Management Board / Flickr

A new viral disease has been found in Missouri. That’s according to a report out of the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The virus, named the Heartland virus, was first observed in two northwest Missouri farmers. Scott Folk is the Director of Infectious Diseases at Heartland Regional Medical Center in St. Joseph, and is a co-author on the study. He first diagnosed the two farmers with a bacterial disease called erlichiosis, which symptoms include fever, muscle fatigue, headache and nausea.