documentary

New documentary on Churchill premieres

Oct 23, 2013
Maureen Lewis-Stump / KBIA

The National Winston Churchill Museum in Fulton is hoping to get more visitors through a new documentary.

The film was shown Tuesday night at the Jefferson City Capitol City Cinema as an inaugural presentation for the theater. It was preceded by a reception at Capitol City Cork and Provisions, a new restaurant that is connected to the theater.

Rob Havers is the Director of the Churchill Museum. He said he hopes the film will help with tourism.

Photo courtesy of Dirty Wars

In the past few months, a trio of documentary films and the feature film Zero Dark Thirty have given viewers an inside look at counterterrorism and covert warfare. The films coincide with a growing international scrutiny of drone strikes — a new type of targeted killing that’s been the centerpiece of U.S. counterintelligence strategy since Barack Obama became president.  

Reinventionstories.org

Hostess. Nordyne. Fuqua Building Systems. AP Green.

The shutdown of all these plants signaled the loss of hundreds of Missouri jobs. Now imagine if it was just one powerhouse plant that helped define a city – a city known for its innovation and production.

“Dayton, Ohio has a big legacy of invention,” filmmaker Steve Bognar says. “From the car starter, to the step ladder, to the pop top can, to the cash register [having been] invented here.”

But imagine that plant closes. How does a city of inventors reinvent itself in this new time?

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

Before the American Revolution, before the Civil War, before Lewis and Clark came through here, a huge tree has been standing in central Missouri, growing to 90-feet tall. The beloved bur oak – which everybody calls "The Big Tree" -- has survived floods, lightning strikes and all kinds of punishments during her 350 years on the prairie. But, as Harvest Public Media’s Peggy Lowe reports, last year’s record drought was especially hard on the Big Tree.

Courtesy of Pussy Riot - A Punk Prayer

During the True/False Documentary Film Festival in Columbia, directors from around the world gather to screen their films and talk about their craft.

The True/False film festival happens 'in the slash'

Mar 1, 2013
True False Film Festival sign
TrueFalseFilmFestival / Flickr

Catch all of KBIA's filmmaker interviews for this year's True/False Film Festival. Read True/False Conversations or listen to them through iTunes.

The world Paul Sturtz and David Wilson have spent 10 years creating started with the schism between reality and fiction.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

There is nothing unusual about political fights over public school curricula and the content of textbooks. The textbooks can influence how people think about history and social issues, sometimes for decades or more. So, the battles take place around the United States,  and they take place around the world.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

vagabond by nature / Flickr

One of the stranger events at T/F this year isn’t even a film. The Third Coast International Audio Festival is bringing seven audio documentaries to Columbia and “screening” them in a darkened theater. It’s called the Third Coast Breakfast Club and it’s playing Saturday at 10am in little Ragtag.

MU Cooperative Media Group

MU Extension will premiere a documentary about the life of Eliot Battle, a long time educator and counselor for Columbia Public Schools.

Full Frame Documentary Film Festival / Flickr

The film How to Die in Oregon, follows several terminally ill patients as they undertake the difficult decision to end their lives under the state’s controversial Death with Dignity Act.