Donald Trump

The Coalition of Graduate Workers (CGW) at the University of Missouri is discussing ways to make the school a "sanctuary campus" for students who may be in the United States illegally. The organization held a listening session on Wednesday. Students, faculty, staff and community members discussed policy ideas to present to the university.


The BBC contacted Facebook about flaws in how the social network flags and filters child pornography, and Facebook called the cops on the BBC. Why?

Angus Crawford, BBC: “Facebook failed to remove sexualised images of children

Possible Budget Cuts Threaten Local Arts Programs

Mar 3, 2017

COLUMBIA -- Missouri arts programs are threatened by possible budget cuts to the National Endowments for the Arts, or N.E.A. These arts programs rely on the N.E.A’s federal funding, which supports part of the Missouri Arts Council’s budget. However the Missouri Arts Council’s  budget will not receive any immediate cuts and will continue to keep its core funding from the state.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Should all credentialed press be admitted to a White House briefing? White House Press Secretary excluded reporters from several major national news organizations last week. Why did he do it? And, what’s the industry’s response?

Ayesha Rascoe, Reuters, “White House bars some news organizations from briefing

Views of the News: When It's More Than A Game

Feb 27, 2017

Dexter Fowler told an ESPN reporter last week that the travel ban’s effect on his family was “unfortunate.” Fowler’s family was going to visit his wife’s family in Iran, but they postponed due to travel concerns. His comment was met with wave of criticism on social media. Among the comments were “shut up” and “just play ball.” Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Stacey Woelfel discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, “Views of the News.”

Does the use of anonymous sources and leaked material by journalists make them the enemy? We haven’t heard words like that from a president since the days of Richard Nixon.

Reena Flores, CBS News: “White House chief of staff says take Trump seriously when he calls press ‘the enemy’

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The national "Day Without Immigrants" includes actions in both of Missouri's metropolitan areas.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Cherokee Street, the hub of traditional Mexican cuisine in St. Louis, was mostly quiet at lunch hour Thursday after several restaurants closed in solidarity.

Meanwhile, the Kansas City Star reports that 400 to 500 protesters gathered near City Hall, many holding banners and signs such as "Somos America," which translates to "We're America."

What does it mean when President Donald Trump only calls on reporters from publications owned by buddy Rupert Murdoch? And, the next day, calls on two more from right-leaning organizations?

Jim Rutenberg, New York Times: “When a pillar of the fourth estate rests on a Trump-Murdoch axis

Did journalists really fail to report on more than 75 terror attacks like President Trump claims? Or, is he exaggerating to cover up for an advisor’s comments about the non-existent Bowling Green “massacre?” Also, Bill O’Reilly’s reaction to criticism from the Kremlin, how fake news is creating a chilling effect on satirists, and what to expect from Snapchat after its parent company goes public. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Did journalists really fail to report on more than 75 terror attacks like President Trump claims? Or, is he exaggerating to cover up for an advisor’s comments about the non-existent Bowling Green “massacre?”

Mark Hensch & Jordan Fabian: “White House lists terror attacks it claims media ignored

Elena Rivera / KBIA

A group of teachers from Mid-Missouri gathered Monday outside Sen. Roy Blunt’s office in downtown Columbia to protest Betsy DeVos’ nomination for secretary of education.

Blunt said in a statement last week that he looks forward to working with DeVos, but the Senate has not yet cast a full vote. The Senate is still deliberating over DeVos’ nomination, but is expected to make a decision around noon today.

Teachers traveled from as far as Kansas City to urge Blunt to vote no on DeVos.

Westminster-mo.edu

In the wake of the Trump administration’s limitations on refugees, immigrants and green-card holders from seven Muslim-majority countries entering the United States, yesterday a lecturer at Westminster College in Fulton spoke about how politics and faith have always been at odds.

Charles Kimball, a religious studies professor at the University of Oklahoma and an expert on Jewish, Christian and Muslim relations, delivered Westminster’s fifth annual C.S. Lewis lecture to a full house at the Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Aldermanbury.

Renee Hickman / KBIA

About 100 people gathered for a lunchtime protest outside Sen. Roy Blunt’s office Tuesday to voice their opposition to various aspects of President Donald Trump’s agenda.

CoMo for Progress, a progressive community group, organized the event to address President Trump’s recent cabinet picks and his executive order banning immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S.

Protestors chanted, held signs and delivered letters expressing their concerns to Sen. Blunt’s local office staff.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Reporters were working overtime this weekend, covering the fallout from President Trump’s executive order limiting travel from seven countries.

Evan Perez, Pamela Brown & Kevin Liptak, CNN: “Inside the confusion of the Trump executive order and travel ban

Catherine Wheeler / KBIA

The steps of the Islamic Center of Central Missouri in Columbia are covered with the support of the community. Yellow flowers, signs, candles, and balloons line the steps in a show of support for the local Muslim community.


USDA

 

Just one day after directing its researchers not to publicly share their research, and after suffering a public relations backlash, the Department of Agriculture’s main research arm has rescinded its original order, saying it “values and is committed to maintaining the free flow of information between our scientists and the American public…”

Courtesy: NBC News

Alternate facts. A slip of the tongue? Or just one more symbol of the relationship between the reporters and the Trump administration?

USDA

 

Employees of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s main research arm, the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), received an email from the division’s chief of staff ordering them to stop publicizing their work.

“Starting immediately and until further notice, ARS will not release any public-facing documents,” the email from Sharon Drumm reads, in part. “This includes, but is not limited to, news releases, photos, fact sheets, news feeds, and social media content.”

usembassy_montevideo/Flickr

President-elect Donald Trump plans to pick former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue to lead the Agriculture Department, a transition official and a source close to the process confirmed to NPR.

Trump is expected to make a formal announcement on Thursday, ending a months-long process that left Agriculture Secretary as the final Cabinet post to be filled.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

The world will be watching as President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office Friday. Among the big issues we’re keeping an eye on: what his relationship will be with journalists. We got a glimpse of it during last week’s news conference, in which he lashed out at CNN’s Jim Acosta. Is that the new normal?

If, as the old saying goes, past performance is the best predictor of future behavior, then I have a pretty good idea of what we can expect from President Trump. 

How do journalists ring in the New Year?  Megyn Kelly announced she was moving from Fox News to NBC.  CNN's Don Lemon rivaled Mariah Carey for most embarrassing moment by getting progressively more drunk on live TV.  A Washington Post reporter chronicled the death threats he received for his aggressive coverage of Donald Trump.  And lots of us talked about how we could cover the president-elect and other big stories with more clarity and purpose in 2017.  Meanwhile, some big brands tackled Islamophobia in new video ads.

Megyn Kelly says goodbye to Fox News

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Missouri's electors who voted for President-elect Donald Trump have received a mixed response from onlookers.

Supporters in the Capitol clapped and cheered when the state's 10 electors all cast their ballots for Trump.

An opponent in the crowded Senate Lounge called out "justice for all" after the vote took place. A woman in response told the man to "get over it."

The votes for Trump were expected, although opponents looking to block the president-elect from taking office had hoped some electors would change their minds.

David Shane / Flickr

 Missouri's Republican electors soon will gather to cast their votes for the next president of the United States.

The state's 10 GOP electors are set to vote this afternoon at 2 p.m. in the Capitol.

Eight electors interviewed by The Associated Press said they'll vote for Republican President-elect Donald Trump. AP was unable to interview the two other electors.

The voting process has lasted mere minutes in past Missouri elections.

But this year it's being closely watched following an outpouring of pressure from those hoping to stop Trump from taking office.

Sarah Kellogg/ KBIA

A month has passed since Donald Trump was elected as the 45th President of the United States. In these past few weeks, many Democrats and even some Republicans are wondering how this happened. Author Thomas Frank visited the University of Missouri a couple of days after the election and offered a few explanations.

Frank believes that there is no one complete reason as to why Trump won the nomination, but he believes that Trump understood how many Americans felt going into the election.

Well.  I did not see this election coming.  I take no comfort in being in good company.  The evidence was in plain sight.  I chose to discount or ignore it, because I was wed to old ways of thinking.  Clearly many of the analytics we use in elections are obsolete or irrelevant or both.  This applies especially to polls, whose problems I have been talking about in this space for some time.

Sarah Kellogg

Residents all over the state of Missouri cast their ballot for the next president on Tuesday. In what’s been called one of the most polarizing elections in history, Residents at watch parties in Columbia and Jefferson City talked to KBIA reporters about their reactions to Donald Trump winning the presidency.

Next week I’ll give you most of my predictions for key elections.  I’ll give you one today: Hillary Clinton will win the presidential election. 

I realize this revelation will send few of you to the fainting couch.  Most observers are predicting this outcome, and with good reason.

I have my reasons as well and I thought I’d look back at how I’ve been tracking the presidential race from this spot on the dial over the last year.

Last October I said: “Candidates who have the best organizations usually prevail.”  Yes, that’s one of the reasons Clinton will win.

While the third and final presidential debate set for Wednesday evening will surely be marked by the candidates’ disagreements, a forum debating their positions on food and farm issues Wednesday morning was notable for showcasing where the nominees agree.

At a Washington, D.C. forum produced by the agricultural policy group Farm Foundation, surrogates for the Trump and Clinton campaigns presented their candidates’ takes on farm and food issues from trade to taxes. Sam Clovis, a campaign co-chair and policy advisor, spoke on the positions of Republican nominee Donald Trump. Former U.S. Department of Agriculture deputy Kathleen Merrigan spoke on behalf of Democrat Hillary Clinton.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Ask Republican Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri about his party's presidential nominee and you'll likely get a polite but weary response.

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