Earnest Perry

Courtesy NBC

NBC Medical Editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman and the team she worked with in Liberia are now under a mandatory quarantine ordered by the New Jersey Health Department.

On last week's Views of the News, we talked about how Synderman was self-monitoring and in isolation after being exposed to Ebola by cameraman Ashoka Mukpo.

  Comments are as much a part of news websites as articles, photos and video.  But, this content isn’t vetted, isn’t edited, and sometimes isn’t even read prior to publication. While many news organizations say they’re committed to giving the audience a voice, they find themselves struggling to do that while upholding their editorial standards. How do you keep the trolls from invading your news site’s smart, open dialogue? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink: a special edition of Views of the News.


via Twitter

Comments are as much a part of news websites as articles, photos and video.  But, this content isn’t vetted, isn’t edited, and sometimes isn’t even read prior to publication. While many news organizations say they’re committed to giving the audience a voice, they find themselves struggling to do that while upholding their editorial standards.

The psychology of web trolling

Courtesy WMC-TV

    If we're being honest, we laugh at people on television who accidentally say curse words, or reporters and photographers who have to react quickly before a bad situation gets worse. But, we rarely know the story behind the story. Here's one of those. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

    The pressure is on for big-name NFL advertisers, like CoverGirl cosmetics, to pull their ad dollars after the Ray Rice domestic abuse scandal. How has the news media contributed to the discussion? Should companies pull ads? Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

    

  Advertisers are starting to feel pressure to drop their NFL sponsorships in light of how the league is handling domestic abuse cases. What role has the news media played in that?  Also, the Columbia Missourian fact-checks the “Mizzou Made” commercial, and some emotional moments in local television news. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

There is pressure on the big-name sponsors of the National Football League to pull their advertising dollars in the aftermath of the domestic abuse scandal.  The public has joined the chant, calling attention to Cover Girl cosmetics (left) for its "Game Face" campaign, using manipulated images of made-up women with bruises on their face.  How has the news media contributed to the discussion?

Meet The Press / NBC

A visibly-nervous Chuck Todd took over last Sunday morning as the moderator of NBC's flagship political program, "Meet the Press." With the show having previously experienced a drop in ratings many wonder if audiences are over Sunday morning talk shows -- or if Todd has the power to turn things around. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Fox & Friends / Fox News

More than six months ago, a hotel surveillance camera caught Ray Rice beating his now-wife unconscious in an elevator. After TMZ released the surveillance footage on Monday, the Baltimore Ravens cut Rice from the team within hours and the NFL suspended him indefinitely. “Fox & Friends” co-hosts responded to the video with comments including “she still married him” and “the message is, when you're in an elevator, there's a camera." Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Travis McMillen

  

    

  More than six months ago, a hotel surveillance camera caught Ray Rice beating his now-wife unconscious in an elevator. For months the NFL was criticized by activists, reporters and columnists for only having suspended him from the first two regular season games. But after TMZ released the surveillance footage on Monday, the Baltimore Ravens cut Rice from the team within hours and the NFL suspended him indefinitely.Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

The Baltimore Ravens cut Ray Rice after TMZ releases graphic video of him assaulting his now-wife in a hotel elevator, six months after the incident. How did media pressure play into the decision? NBC re-launches “Meet the Press” with Chuck Todd at the helm, Bloomberg News fails to cover the return of it’s CEO, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and why another new reporting fellowship the Huffington Post has some journalism purists raising an eyebrow. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

Keith Allison / Flickr

More than six months ago, Ray Rice was caught on surveillance video beating his then-fiancee unconscious in an Atlantic City hotel elevator.   In July, the National Football League disciplined Rice for the incident, suspending him from the first two regular season games.

Throughout the summer, the league came under heavy criticism in the press.  Activists, reporters and columnists came down hard on the NFL for having stiffer penalties for players charged with illegal drug use. 

A group of minority journalists are fighting to bring more diversity to American newsrooms, journalism conferences, panels and classrooms. The Journalism Diversity Project is designed to make it easy for hiring managers and event organizers to find qualified experts who are journalists of color. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss. 

Gary He / US Department of Labor

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) called out male senate colleagues for comments made about her body, like “pooky” and “fat,” in her new book, Off the Sidelines. Should the names of the senators be revealed?

Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

 

Video claims to show the beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloff.  How big of a gaffe was it when President Barack Obama said he doesn’t “have a strategy yet” for dealing with ISIS in Syria? Should reporters name names when saying they’ve experienced boorish behavior at the hands of U.S. senators? And, the steps the St. Louis media is taking to keep the story of Ferguson on the front page. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

via SITE

A video released by the militant group ISIS appears to show the beheading of American journalist Steven J. Sotloff, 31.  The freelance reporter was taken captive while reporting on the bloody civil war in Syria last year.  Sotloff is the second American journalist slain by ISIS militants in two weeks in retaliation for military strikes against the group.

Twitter

What one journalist, and former KBIA reporter, witnessed other reporters do in Ferguson, Mo. led him to stop filing stories. Al Jazeera freelancer Ryan Schuessler wrote a personal blog post detailing the disrespectful actions he saw and why he decided to leave (for now). Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Courtesy Columbia Daily Tribune

When the Columbia Daily Tribune published an editorial cartoon about looting in Ferguson, Managing Editor Jim Robertson said the intent was to be provocative. What some readers saw was racism. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

An editorial cartoon in the Columbia Daily Tribune sparks cries of racism from readers, the Huffington Post names a new “Ferguson Fellow” to spend a year looking into how the St. Louis County police department got its military-grade equipment, and a young journalist speaks out on why it’s time step out of Ferguson and let the region heal.  Also, how Facebook comments led a cops reporter to quit and a police chief to lose his job, why CNN will soon be doing less with less and ESPN’s reporting on Michael Sam’s shower habits. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 

Courtesy Columbia Daily Tribune

This editorial cartoon, published in the August 20, 2014 edition of the Columbia Daily Tribune drew cries of racism from readers who worry the imagery paints Missouri as a "racist and backwater region."

Managing Editor Jim Robertson said he thought it was provocative, but its intent was not racism.

Cherie Cullen / Department of Defense

The rumors swirled for much of last week, after an exclusive Politico report, that David Gregory was out at Meet the Press. NBC made it official on Thursday. Chuck Todd will take over as moderator of the program on September 7. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss. 

freejamesfoley.org

The militant Jihadist group ISIS released video of the beheading of journalist James Foley in retaliation, it says, for the U.S. air strikes in Iraq. Foley went missing on Thanksgiving day, 2012, in Syria. In the video Foley is kneeling against a desert landscape, wearing something resembling an orange prison jump suit.  ISIS is threatening to kill another journalist they are holding if air strikes do not stop. Has the role journalists play in war zones changed? Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry, and Amy Simons discuss. 

More than a ten journalists have been arrested, dozens more tear gassed trying to cover the violence in Ferguson, Missouri.  Governor Jay Nixon lost control of a nationally televised news conference, and cable news anchors turn into advocates on-screen.  What role is the media playing in the continuing conflict? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Austin Federa / KBIA

So much has happened in Ferguson, Missouri.  Nearly a dozen reporters have been arrested while on the job.  We've learned the identity of Michael Brown's shooter: six-year police veteran Darren Wilson. St. Louis NBC-affiliate KSDK-TV aired video of his home.  Governor Jay Nixon instituted -- and lifted -- curfews and called in the Missouri National Guard.

And we saw it all live -- online, on air and in print.

Police in Ferguson, Missouri shot and killed an unarmed teen.  Was race a factor in the death of Michael Brown? Or has the framing of the story by local and national journalists made it one?  Also, keeping reporters safe during violent protests, the role of citizen journalists and hashtag activism in the aftermath. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink: Views of the News.


Courtesy CNN

A police officer Ferguson, Missouri fatally shot an unarmed teen.  Was race a factor in the death of Michael Brown? Or has the framing of the story by local and national journalists made it one?  Also, keeping reporters safe during violent protests, the role of citizen journalists and hashag activism in the aftermath.

Courtesy ESPN/NFL Films

Michael Sam made history, becoming the first openly gay football player to be drafted into the NFL.  Saturday, the St. Louis Rams used their seventh round pick to take Sam, giving him a chance to make the team later this summer.

ESPN has a crew with Sam while he watched the draft and awaited word of his future.  And, when the call came from Rams head coach Jeff Fisher, the network decided to air Sam's emotional response in its entirety, live on on television.

Monica Lewinsky is breaking her silence, writing in Vanity Fair that it’s time to “burn the beret and blue dress.” After 17 years, why did she choose to speak out now about her affair with President Bill Clinton?  Also, journalists rubbing elbows with politicians at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, how local, national and international coverage varied during last week’s controversial execution in Oklahoma, and coverage of the kidnapped Nigerian girls. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.


On Thursday, May 8, the new issue of Vanity Fair will hit newsstands.  Inside, there will be an item penned by former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.  After 17 years, she's breaking her silence and talking about her affair with President Bill Clinton and what her life has been like since it became public.

Vanity Fair: “Exclusive: Monica Lewinsky writes about her affair with President Clinton

Clippers owner Donald Sterling, banned from basketball for life for making racist comments.  How did TMZ get the scoop that rocked professional sports?  E-mails between producers of ‘Chicagoland’ and Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s office show some storylines on the CNN docu-series may have been staged. Also, Indy Star’s #ShowUsYourGuns and a look back at NPR’s first foray on the internet. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

Pages