education

This week, as most metro-area students head back to class, there's a fair amount of uncertainty for Missouri teachers who aren't sure what changes, if any, are coming to the Common Core academic standards they've been using for the past four years.

Elected officials have until October to name their picks for committees to review the state's academic standards. And depending on those committees' feedback, Missouri could have all-new standards in two years.

With two weeks to go until teachers report for the beginning of the new school year, the Normandy Schools Collaborative said Monday it has hired 80 percent of the staff it needs, from custodians to principals.

But just to make sure it hasn’t overlooked any good teachers who are still looking for employment, the district said it will be holding a job fair two days later this week.

Maureen Lewis-Stump / KBIA

The summer session for Smithton, West, Oakland, Lange and Gentry middle schools began almost three weeks ago and with that beginning, came a huge project for the students to work on.

KOMU

Dr. Carter D. Ward announced his retirement as Executive Director of the Missouri School Boards’ Association (MSBA) after working with the organization for more than 40 years.

At 68 years old, Ward said his decision was based primarily on age. He doesn’t have immediate plans to reengage in the work force but plans to spend time with his family.

“It’s always been very meaningful, engaging work and it’s been real fortunate for me to have had the opportunity to be engaged in this work for a career,” he said.

Some believe that learning and listening to music, particularly classical music, at a young age is tied to success in the future. 

In Columbia, there are many efforts to get children interested in classical music: multiple avenues for music education, and even classical music performances in town targeted at kids.

Today on Intersection, we’ll talk about how young people in Mid-Missouri are exposed to these influences, and about some of the challenges in reaching them.

Guests:

Kellie Moore, ColumbiaFAVS.com

When Lauren Wieland graduated from eighth grade this month, there were 3 students in her graduating class.

  She was one of 32 students attending Zion Lutheran School, a two-room schoolhouse in Lone Elm, near Boonville.

When the school opened in 1896, it had only one room. It turns out, there are many one-room schoolhouses that still dot the landscape of rural Missouri today.

In the 1960s, Zion Lutheran got its second classroom. That’s also when the school got bathrooms – until then, it had old-fashioned outhouses.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri lawmakers have passed a budget that would restore Medicaid benefits cut a decade ago and boost spending on public education.

missouri capitol
File Photo / KBIA

The Missouri Senate has endorsed a construction funding bill that includes projects on college campuses and for the Highway Patrol.

University of Missouri discontinues Mizzou Reads program

May 1, 2014
columns at university of missouri
File Photo / KBIA

After 10 years, the University of Missouri is discontinuing its Mizzou Reads program due to a lack of faculty and staff participation.

Columbia College
File Photo / KBIA

A Columbia College professor gave a generous gift to the Tradition Meets Tomorrow campaign today.

Criminal Justice professor Barry Langford gave a gift of $111,000 to the campaign. His contribution will fund the mock trial program which he has been a part of since its beginning in 1997.

File Photo / KBIA

Missouri senators passed legislation that could pave the way for the state to dump new benchmarks for student achievement known as the Common Core Standards.

KOMU News / Flickr

Moberly Area Community College will offer benefits for domestic partners of full-time college employees.

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

 

A potential $600 million bonding plan for state buildings has passed the Missouri Senate.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

State lawmakers return from their spring break today, and the Missouri House is preparing to consider a proposed state budget that partly ties education funding to the strength of the economy.

House Majority Leader John Diehl says debate will begin this week on the budget for the next fiscal year. The plan endorsed by the House Budget Committee would add $122 million to the state's $3 billion in basic school funding. But if state revenues meet more optimistic projections, then it would provide a $278 million increase for schools.

Missouri School for the Deaf gets first deaf leader

Mar 10, 2014
Ernest Garrett III

The Missouri School for the Deaf in Fulton will have its first deaf superintendent as of July 1 this year.

Missouri Capitol
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri lawmakers have given initial approval to a mid-year budget plan that addresses funding shortfalls for schools and social services.

Chris Belcher
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Columbia Public Schools announced in an e-mail to staff Friday it decided on four final candidates to interview for the position of superintendent of schools. The Board of Education has not released the names of the candidates but will be interviewing them over several days to come.

state capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Missouri senators have approved legislation that would control student transfers from the state's most troubled school districts.

stephenconn / Flickr

The chairman of the Missouri House Higher Education committee spoke to students and staff at Westminster College today about the future of higher education.

Explosives Ph.D. program to be nation's first

Feb 13, 2014
Missouri S&T seal
Sasikiran 10 / Wikimedia

Missouri S&T will begin planning their doctorate program in explosive engineering. The university is the first to have a program in the field after gaining approval from the Missouri Board of Higher Education this week.

MarkyBon / Flickr

The Missouri Lottery has provided a larger-than-usual payment to public education because of stronger-than-usual sales.

computer keyboard
Remko van Dokkum / Flickr

The path to a high school equivalency certificate in Missouri is about to be rewired.

Starting in January the GED exam, which has been used in the state since the 1940s, will be replaced.  It’s a move driven by digital change and an age old consideration -- cost.

Keyboards replace pencils

forwardstl / flickr

Missouri's unemployment rate declined in November while payrolls expanded by 15,000 jobs.

The Missouri Department of Economic Development reported Tuesday the jobless rate fell to 6.1 percent in November from 6.5 percent in October.

The leading gainer was educational and health services, which added 5,200 jobs last month. The construction sector grew by 2,300 and professional and business services increased by 2,000 jobs. The information, leisure and hospitality sectors each declined by 200 jobs.

missouri house floor
File Photo / KBIA News

A proposal to circumvent thousands of potential student transfers in the Kansas City area will be considered by the state legislature next year.

If passed, the proposal would allow local school districts to set class sizes and student-to-teacher ratios, and once reached, those districts could not be forced to accept transfer students from unaccredited school districts. The bill has been pre-filed by Democratic Senator Paul LeVota of Independence.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Gov. Jay Nixon wants Missouri's universities to freeze undergraduate tuition next year while also proposing more state funding.

The governor says the budget he recommends next year will include an additional $36.7 million for public universities. The 5 percent funding increase would be distributed using a performance-based funding system.

Nixon announced the proposal Wednesday at Missouri State University in Springfield.

The governor called for a tuition freeze at four-year schools for Missouri undergraduates in the 2014-2015 academic year.

Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media

In the Shadows of the Slaughterhouse, part 2: Immigrant communities have sprung up around the meatpacking plant in Garden City, Kan., and while change hasn't been easy, city leaders have built a strong grassroots network supporting and embracing the town’s cultural evolution and its youngest citizens.

GARDEN CITY, Kan. — Sister Janice Thome’s office is a 2003 brown Ford Focus with a backseat piled high with paperwork and a prayer book.

Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

In the Shadows of the Slaughterhouse, part 1: Attracted to stable jobs in the meatpacking industry, communities of immigrants are springing up across rural America. Many small, rural towns, however, struggle to provide much more than instruction.

It’s almost 9 a.m., and Noel Primary School teacher Erin McPherson is helping a group of Spanish-speaking students complete English language exercises. But it’s tough going.

Katie Link / KBIA

Leaders of the Columbia public school district plan to seek another $50 million bond issue in April, followed by new $40 million bond proposals every two years until 2020.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports the $50 million bond issue on the April ballot will require a 4-cent tax increase. The subsequent $40 million bonds in 2016, 2018 and 2020 would require no tax increase.

Democratic Governor Jay Nixon has released just over half of the 400 million dollars he withheld earlier this year from Missouri’s current state budget.  215-million dollars will be divvied up among K-through-12 schools, higher education, mental health programs and specific programs for training health care professional in southwest Missouri.  Nixon released the money Thursday after Republican lawmakers on Wednesday failed to override his veto of a controversial tax cut bill.

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