Education

Exploring the Paths of Missouri's Special Education: A Primer

Apr 7, 2015

Experts and parents alike have been confused on whether Missouri is really the last state to have separate, state funded schools for the severely disabled.

When Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA, passed in 2006, the U.S. witnessed a rapid change in special education, including a push for more inclusive education. This meant the closure of many of these separate schools across the country, but Missouri still has 34.

This story is one of five in a series, "Exploring the Paths of Missouri's Special Education." Check for an update next week, where you’ll find a story on the history of special education across the nation, and here at home. 


Michaela Tucker/KBIA

Spring has arrived at Granny’s House. Kids threw footballs and ran around outside on Thursday afternoon. Granny’s House is a non-profit, supported by Columbia churches and businesses that provides a safe space for children who live in public housing from 3-6 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Pam Ingram and her husband Ellis, who are also known by “Granny” and “Poppy,” have run the program for 14 years. In addition to the after school program, the Ingrams coordinate other activities for the kids, like Science Club and Bible study.

Michaela Tucker/KBIA

Located in the center of the Douglass Housing Development in Columbia, Granny's House has served the neighborhood for 14 years. Run by Pam and Ellis Ingram, the program provides study groups about Christianity and a safe place for kids to be after school. Volunteers from churches and the University of Missouri's service learning program provide mentorship and guidance for the kids. KBIA's Michaela Tucker collected the sounds of an afternoon at Granny's House for this audio postcard. 

MU News Bureau

David D. Kurpius, professor and associate vice chancellor for enrollment management at Louisiana State University, will be the new dean of the Missouri School of Journalism, starting July 1, 2015.

MU Title IX Office Releases Data for Fall 2014 Semester

Apr 2, 2015
columns at university of missouri
File Photo / KBIA

The University of Missouri Title IX office has released data it collected from the 2014 fall semester. 

Of the 144 reports that were released, 135 fell under one or more of the five categories the office uses to classify violations.

Camille Phillips / KBIA

Columbia Public Schools released a video Tuesday, March 31, 2015 detailing what Deputy Superintendent Dana Clippard calls its best and final offer in response to the teacher’s union’s request for changes to the current teacher compensation contract.

Alberto G. / FLICKR

  Fulton Public Schools has changed the principal of Fulton Middle School after the district self-reported federal privacy law violations on Monday.

The school district confirmed Christopher Crane is no longer at the school.

The district informed the US Department of Education of the violations that occurred on March 20 when gym teachers asked students a series of identifying questions as part of an exercise called “Claim It.” During the exercise, students were asked to step forward if an identifying detail applied to them.

Some of the questions were about sensitive topics included sexual behavior, mental or psychological problems, and religion. According to federal law, these questions require a parent’s consent before a student is required to answer them.

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson/KBIA

  In the past, alternative schools have been associated with their negative reputations. It’s typically understood as the place where the “bad kids” go. However, from the outside looking in, Frederick Douglass High School looks like the average school. But the reality is Douglass is not a typical school. It’s an alternative school. However, the school’s non-traditional approach to student learning started to catch wind. Douglass has broken down the barrier of stereotypes with the help of a cooking class and a teacher.


Fulton Public Schools has launched an investigation into a teacher-led activity referred to as a "survey" that has upset participating students and parents.

The Fulton Sun reports that during a Fulton Middle School physical education class on Friday, teachers conducted an activity called "Claim It," in which students were read various statements about their identity. If the statement applied to a student's life, he or she stepped forward in a line, according to the "Claim It" activity materials.

Columbia College
File Photo / KBIA

The Columbia College Board of Trustees will vote in April on a proposal to split the college into separate schools.

columns at university of missouri
File Photo / KBIA

The police chief of the University of Missouri in Columbia is retiring after more than four decades with the department. 

Sahir Majid / KBIA

The MU School of Medicine held its annual Match Day event Friday, which is part of the National Residency Matching Program. Graduating seniors receive their residency invitation letters all at once at the event.

Columbia Public Schools

Columbia Public Schools Assistant Superintendent for Elementary Education Ben Tilley began his presentation to the Columbia Public Schools Board of Education with a little physics. Every action the board makes in drawing boundary lines, he said, with have an equal, but opposite, reaction.

The University of Missouri student conduct office has suspended a student for making threatening comments toward another student.  The comments were aimed at the author of a letter to the editor that was published in the Maneater. Farah El-Jayyousi wrote a letter to the paper explaining why the movie, “American Sniper” should not be shown on campus.

The student will be suspended until the formal conduct process is complete. 

Amanda Byler / KBIA

Mizzou Students for Life, a local chapter of a national anti-abortion organization, gathered in the MU Student Center Wednesday as a part of a national campaign about Planned Parenthood.  

rik-shaw / FLICKR

 

  A bill to ban Missouri's A+ Scholarship from going to immigrants living in the U.S. illegally has passed the state Senate.

Senators approved the measure 25-8 on Tuesday. The legislation now moves to the House.

The bill would make the state's A+ Scholarship available only to U.S. citizens and permanent residents. The scholarship money pays for two years of free tuition at community colleges.

Republican bill sponsor Sen. Gary Romine says it's unfair to open the scholarship to immigrants in Missouri illegally when money for the program already is stretched thin.

MU College of Arts and Sciences Receives $1 Million Gift

Mar 13, 2015
Chris Yunker / Flickr

  University of Missouri grad Mark Wilkins is giving the MU College of Arts and Sciences a 1 million dollar gift. MU announced Friday that the money will go to create the Mark A. Wilkins Fund for Excellence, and will help retain and recruit professors for the college.

According to the MU News Bureau, the fund could provide money for faculty salary stipends, staff support, teaching materials, and research and travel expenses related to the presentation of research and educational projects.

jeremy.wilburn / Flickr

Columbia Public Schools and that Columbia Missouri National Education Association have not been seeing eye to eye in recent negotiations.

Flickr

A Westminster College chapter of a national fraternity has been suspended indefinitely due to hazing and offensive comments on a social media site. 

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

Immigrants living in Missouri illegally couldn't receive scholarships or in-state tuition under a bill approved by the House.

With This Missouri Teacher, The Lesson Is Live

Mar 11, 2015

Each weekday morning, promptly at 7:20 a.m., Robyn King's students go live.

"Are we ready?" King asked on a recent Monday, holding up a single finger pointed at two wide-eyed students sitting at a desk in front of a tripod-mounted iPad. "OK, here we go."

true false film festival
True/False

The True/False Film Fest wrapped up last week, bringing filmgoers from around the world to celebrate the year’s newest documentaries. The festival, which is in its 12th year, brings the intimate and harsh truths of storytelling to life. Although the festival mainly focuses on the films and their directors, local high school students were given the opportunity to dive into one of Columbia's richest traditions. KBIA's Marissanne Lewis-Thompson spoke with the festivals education director Polina Malikin about the importance of the film festival for students. 

umkc.edu

University of Missouri-Kansas City students say they're ultimately satisfied with answers over questions regarding the college's business school, which an audit found it knowingly submitted false data in applying for rankings and awards. 

Look closely.

Buried deep in President Obama's 2016 budget (Page 41) is a proposal to cut up to 30 questions from the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA.

The Obama administration has already done a lot to make the FAFSA easier — if not shorter. Online technology now allows students to skip questions that don't apply to them.

KOMUnews / FLICKR

  The House Education Committee passed a bill on Monday which would require public school activities to be available to home-schooled students in the area.

Wentzville Republican Bryan Spencer says the taxpayers deserve this option.

“With these people paying taxes I think that they should get something for the dollars that they are contributing to the public school system," Spencer said.

Andy Humphrey / KBIA

Newly hired University of Missouri Provost Garnett Stokes comes to her new position with many plans to improve the university’s academic programs.  Stokes led as provost and executive vice president at Florida State University and handled many situations involving Title IX regulations, teacher salaries, and research achievement. 


EXAM: New MU Provost Focuses on Title IX Policies and Teacher Salaries

Mar 2, 2015
Andy Humphrey / KBIA

Newly hired University of Missouri Provost Garnett Stokes comes to her new position with many plans to improve the university’s academic programs.  Stokes led as provost and executive vice president at Florida State University and handled many situations involving Title IX regulations, teacher salaries, and research achievement.  As KBIA’s Andy Humphrey tells us, Stokes believes that she can use her prior experience to help solve various issues at MU.

Patrick Neville was a 15-year-old sophomore at Columbine High School in 1999. He was on his way to a fast food lunch when the shooting started.

Two students, armed with guns and pipe bombs, had stormed the Colorado school, on their way to killing one teacher and 12 students — some were Neville's friends.

Neville, now a Colorado state representative, says many of Columbine's teachers and faculty acted heroically that day.

But, he says, "I truly believe that had some of them had the legal authority to be armed, more of my friends might be with me today."

school buses
Twix / Flickr

  A Missouri judge says the state's membership to a testing company aligned with the national Common Core education standards is illegal and that it shouldn't pay fees to be part of the group.

Columbia Public Schools

  The Columbia School Board appointed Kristi Shinn to be the new principal of Derby Ridge Elementary school this Monday.

Kristi Shinn is currently the principal of Main Street Elementary School in Troy, Mo, and she has 13 years of experience as an elementary principal and seven years as a teacher.

The Derby Ridge Elementary School’s hiring committee included school administrators, teachers and parents, all of who were impressed by Shinn’s rich experiences, said Michelle Baumstark, community relations director of the School Board.

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