Education

President’s Final Year at Westminster College

Apr 28, 2015
Westminster-mo.edu

After spending 10 years at Westminster College, President Barney Forsythe is retiring at the end of this school year.

Forsythe has served as the president of Westminster since October of 2007. He believes the college has internationalized the campus and created an institutional identity around the liberal arts. They have also built a number of engaging programs using an integrative approach to the liberal arts.

Brady Finn/KBIA

Lincoln University in Jefferson City has entered into a partnership with the program Project SEARCH, which secures competitive employment for people with disabilities by partnering with several Missouri-based organizations to provide real-world opportunities for high school students. Throughout the school year, students work three internships that place them in various departments on campus.


Brady Finn/KBIA

Lincoln University in Jefferson City has entered a partnership with Project SEARCH which gives high school students with disabilities job training. KBIA’s Brady Finn takes you inside the school to figure out what jobs these students are working and what impact the program is making.  

mutigers.com

Missouri has extended football coach Gary Pinkel's contract through the 2019 season and upped his yearly salary to $4.02 million, making him the 10th Southeastern Conference coach to have a yearly salary of at least $4 million.

Pinkel is headed into his 15th season at Missouri and is already the winningest coach in school history with 113 victories. He was making $3.2 million per year.

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  The Missouri School of Journalism has received a $1 million donation to support journalism education and research for the advancement of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.

Heather Adams / KBIA

Since 1975 schools have been mandated by law to provide free, appropriate education to all children, leaving states and schools to figure out what this means for educating children with special needs.The first school for the deaf in the United States opened in the early 1800’ s in Hartford, Connecticut.Since then new educational opportunities and laws have created a wide range of choices for students with disabilities.When Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA, passed in 2006, there was a push for more inclusive education.This meant the closure of many separate, state - funded schools for the disabled across the country and new integration for children in standard public schools.But Missouri still has 34 state schools for the severely disabled. 


Abigail Coursen/KBIA

The use of technology in classrooms is quickly becoming the new normal in education. At the beginning of this year the Columbia Public School District began issuing mini iPads to Battle High School students and to fifth graders at Mill Creek Elementary, through a program called “one-to-one.”

But with these advancements comes the question: how do parents, and even teachers who may not be familiar with modern tools, make sure students are using them to their fullest potential?


Abigail Coursen/KBIA

The use of technology in classrooms is quickly becoming the new norm in education. At the beginning of this year the Columbia Public School District began issuing mini iPads to Battle High School students and to fifth graders at Mill Creek Elementary, through a program called “one-to-one.” But how do parents, and even teachers who may not be familiar with modern tools, make sure students are using them to their advantage? KBIA’s Abigail Coursen went to the workshop sponsored by the local library to report on this story.


By his own admission, author Jon Krakauer is an obsessive guy, and his obsessions often turn into books. His best-sellers include Into the Wild and Into Thin Air, both about man's battle with nature. But his latest book is about a far more intimate struggle. The title lays it out plainly: Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town.

Mexico High School Teacher Accepts Teaching Award

Apr 17, 2015
Sydnee Stottlemyer/KBIA

The Missouri Alliance for Arts Education has awarded Mexico High School speech and theatre teacher Sara Given the creativity and Innovation in Teaching award. Given was recognized at the state capitol for creating the first ever Jellybean Speech Olympics competition. Given’s students who she affectionately calls her “Jellybeans” also performed at the capitol.


students in classroom
Brad Flickinger / Flickr

The public is getting a second chance to weigh in on an effort to review Missouri's educational standards. 

Abigail Keel / KBIA

The most contentious part of a building a new school is shifting attendance boundary lines. Some families get to stay, others switch schools, leave friends, and if they’re lucky, get a shorter commute.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  Indiana has drawn national attention for its religious freedom restoration act, and now Missouri lawmakers have two smaller scale bills on the table. The two bills, which are in the Missouri Senate and House could take away the ability of colleges and universities to police discrimination by religious student organizations.


missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Bills in the Missouri Senate and House would take away college and universities’ ability to police discrimination by religious student organizations. KBIA’s Kyle Norris has more on the bills and how college students around the state are reacting.

Exploring the Paths of Missouri's Special Education: A History

Apr 13, 2015

When Genise Montecello was growing up her brother was separated from his peers and taken to a classroom off to the side, which she remembers being about the size of a broom closet. Her brother has a disability and she feels his education wasn’t seen as important because of this.

“People don’t remember to take into account students with disabilities and their accommodations they might need,” Montecello said. “So, it happens more frequently than people would believe that it does.”

KBIA

MU is looking to increase revenue for its libraries. Administrators are proposing a new student fee to help close the gap in funding.

EXAM: Mexico High School Teacher Accepts Teaching Award at State Capitol

Apr 10, 2015
Sydnee Stottlemyer/KBIA

  The Missouri Alliance for Arts Education has awarded Mexico High School speech and theatre teacher Sara Given the creativity and Innovation in Teaching award. Given was recognized at the state capitol for creating the first ever Jellybean Speech Olympics competition. KBIA’s Sydnee Stottlemyer spoke with Given and her “Jellybeans” about why the Jellybeans Speech Olympics is more than just a competition.

j. stephenconn / Flickr

The Missouri House passed a bill that will require schools to have additional sexual education that is focused on online predators and how to stay safe online.

Exploring the Paths of Missouri's Special Education: A Primer

Apr 7, 2015

Experts and parents alike have been confused on whether Missouri is really the last state to have separate, state funded schools for the severely disabled.

When Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA, passed in 2006, the U.S. witnessed a rapid change in special education, including a push for more inclusive education. This meant the closure of many of these separate schools across the country, but Missouri still has 34.

This story is one of five in a series, "Exploring the Paths of Missouri's Special Education." Check for an update next week, where you’ll find a story on the history of special education across the nation, and here at home. 


Michaela Tucker/KBIA

Spring has arrived at Granny’s House. Kids threw footballs and ran around outside on Thursday afternoon. Granny’s House is a non-profit, supported by Columbia churches and businesses that provides a safe space for children who live in public housing from 3-6 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Pam Ingram and her husband Ellis, who are also known by “Granny” and “Poppy,” have run the program for 14 years. In addition to the after school program, the Ingrams coordinate other activities for the kids, like Science Club and Bible study.

Michaela Tucker/KBIA

Located in the center of the Douglass Housing Development in Columbia, Granny's House has served the neighborhood for 14 years. Run by Pam and Ellis Ingram, the program provides study groups about Christianity and a safe place for kids to be after school. Volunteers from churches and the University of Missouri's service learning program provide mentorship and guidance for the kids. KBIA's Michaela Tucker collected the sounds of an afternoon at Granny's House for this audio postcard. 

MU News Bureau

David D. Kurpius, professor and associate vice chancellor for enrollment management at Louisiana State University, will be the new dean of the Missouri School of Journalism, starting July 1, 2015.

MU Title IX Office Releases Data for Fall 2014 Semester

Apr 2, 2015
columns at university of missouri
File Photo / KBIA

The University of Missouri Title IX office has released data it collected from the 2014 fall semester. 

Of the 144 reports that were released, 135 fell under one or more of the five categories the office uses to classify violations.

Camille Phillips / KBIA

Columbia Public Schools released a video Tuesday, March 31, 2015 detailing what Deputy Superintendent Dana Clippard calls its best and final offer in response to the teacher’s union’s request for changes to the current teacher compensation contract.

Alberto G. / FLICKR

  Fulton Public Schools has changed the principal of Fulton Middle School after the district self-reported federal privacy law violations on Monday.

The school district confirmed Christopher Crane is no longer at the school.

The district informed the US Department of Education of the violations that occurred on March 20 when gym teachers asked students a series of identifying questions as part of an exercise called “Claim It.” During the exercise, students were asked to step forward if an identifying detail applied to them.

Some of the questions were about sensitive topics included sexual behavior, mental or psychological problems, and religion. According to federal law, these questions require a parent’s consent before a student is required to answer them.

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson/KBIA

  In the past, alternative schools have been associated with their negative reputations. It’s typically understood as the place where the “bad kids” go. However, from the outside looking in, Frederick Douglass High School looks like the average school. But the reality is Douglass is not a typical school. It’s an alternative school. However, the school’s non-traditional approach to student learning started to catch wind. Douglass has broken down the barrier of stereotypes with the help of a cooking class and a teacher.


Fulton Public Schools has launched an investigation into a teacher-led activity referred to as a "survey" that has upset participating students and parents.

The Fulton Sun reports that during a Fulton Middle School physical education class on Friday, teachers conducted an activity called "Claim It," in which students were read various statements about their identity. If the statement applied to a student's life, he or she stepped forward in a line, according to the "Claim It" activity materials.

Columbia College
File Photo / KBIA

The Columbia College Board of Trustees will vote in April on a proposal to split the college into separate schools.

columns at university of missouri
File Photo / KBIA

The police chief of the University of Missouri in Columbia is retiring after more than four decades with the department. 

Sahir Majid / KBIA

The MU School of Medicine held its annual Match Day event Friday, which is part of the National Residency Matching Program. Graduating seniors receive their residency invitation letters all at once at the event.

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