european union

AP Photo

Twenty years after Europe's bloodiest war since World War II, Bosnia is a country riven by ethnic divisions and poverty.

After its recent application to join the European Union, Bosnians and their leaders will have to confront their political divisions and the systemic corruption that has thwarted efforts to make it a functioning democracy.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Bosnia's halting recovery from civil war and the challenges of transforming a dysfunctional government. 


In June, the United Kingdom will vote on whether it will remain part of the European Union.

For those who want out, the so-called “Brexit” would allow the U.K. to better control immigration and free it from onerous EU regulations. But opponents say it would devastate the the U.K. economy, with accounting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers saying it would cost the the country 142 billion dollars and almost one million jobs in the next four years.  

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the potential benefits and drawbacks of the UK leaving the EU, as well as what happens if the referendum fails.


Russia is no stranger to conflicts, but under Vladimir Putin its most enduring one may be the war over news and information. Over the past decade the Kremlin has tightened control over television and the Internet.

Outside Russia, it’s also sought to offer its own version of the news in English and other languages. This is often an anti-American narrative about conflicts in Syria, Ukraine and elsewhere in Eastern Europe at odds with news from other agencies.

Online, allies of the Kremlin have reportedly hired hundreds if not thousands of so-called “trolls” to spread disinformation on social media and in the comments section of news sites.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Russia’s information offensive.


For months now, the world has watched as more than a million refugees and migrants from countries like Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan have risked their lives to try and find safe haven in Europe.

But this influx has created enormous tensions in the European Union about how many newcomers to accept and which countries should take them. Governments in Sweden and Germany have each taken in hundreds of thousands of refugees and migrants–and taken criticism both from other European states and their own people.

So, who foots the bill for settling the hundreds of thousands of immigrants? And if no one, where will these people go?


The Paris agreement on reducing greenhouse gas emissions has led to new hope that the worst effects of climate change may be avoided.

On this edition of Global Journalist, our guests analyze the climate agreement and discuss the prospects for keeping Earth's temperature from rising by 2 degrees Celsius, the point at which dramatic changes to the Earth are inescapable.


A year after Scots voted on whether to leave the United Kingdom, the regional parliament in Catalonia has approved a plan to secede from Spain by 2017.

Spain's constitutional court has ruled the plan illegal and most of Spain's major political parties have united against letting Catalans have a referendum on secession. That's wrought anger in a region where Catalans already see Madrid as hostile to their interests, and spooked investors in a country hit hard by Europe's debt crisis. 

Yannis Liakos / AP Photo

Greece's last two bailouts failed to rescue the country. This week, European leaders approved a new $95 billion package for the debt-stricken country. For Greeks, it means more tax hikes and cuts to pensions and other public spending–an option they soundly rejected in a nonbinding referendum in July. Still some argue that this bailout is different than the previous two – and that it may set the country on the path to recovery.

European Parliament / Audiovisual Services for Media

You’re probably well aware that every country has a parliament or a legislature of some sort. But, did you know that Europe, as a whole, also has its own parliament? The European Parliament is part of the European Union, and next week, people in EU member states will go to the polls to elect their representatives. We preview the upcoming elections, talk about the potential rise of more far-right parties making a name on the European stage, and walk you through how the European Parliament works.

Our guests:

Global Journalist

João Vale de Almeida is the Ambassador of the European Union to the United States of America. He sat down with Global Journalist's Jason McLure to discuss the crisis in Ukraine, the EU-U.S. relationship, and other topics. Below are excerpts from that interview, but you can listen to the whole interview above, or watch a video of it at the bottom of this page.

Global Journalist

João Vale de Almeida is the Ambassador of the European Union to the United States of America. He sat down with Global Journalist's Jason McLure to discuss the crisis in Ukraine, the EU-U.S. relationship, and other topics. You can watch the interview below:

Executions on hold as Mo. seeks new death drug

Oct 15, 2013
Nottingham Vet School / Flikr

Missouri's decision to not use the anesthetic propofol for capital punishment leaves the state with dwindling options as it seeks to execute two convicted murderers.

Gov. Jay Nixon last week halted what was to have been the first U.S. execution to use propofol following threats from the European Union to limit the drug's export. Nixon ordered the state corrections department to come up with a different lethal injection protocol.

Nottingham Vet School / Flikr

If Missouri goes through with using a common anesthetic in two executions later this year, it could have a very real impact on hospitals throughout the U.S.

Gov. Jay Nixon said Monday the state will be moving forward with the executions.

The European Union says they will consider possible export limits of the anesthetic propofol if Missouri uses the drug in executions scheduled for this month and next.

The U.S. gets the vast majority of the common anesthetic from the EU.

Nitzan Brumer / FLICKR

Missouri’s plans to use the anesthetic propofol in executions may face new delays.

In May, Missouri announced it was switching to propofol after sodium thiopental, another drug commonly used in executions, became harder to acquire. But, Fresenius Kabi USA, one of propofol’s two domestic suppliers, announced last week it was instructing its distributors not to fill orders from departments of corrections in the United States.

Business Beat: February 29, 2012

Feb 29, 2012
Laura Ziegler / Harvest Public Media

This week: NBAF opponents are gaining strength in their fight against the Disease Laboratory.  Plus, the American Soybean Association is looking for fewer restrictions from the European Union on genetically modified soybeans.

Kevin Dooley / Flickr

The American Soybean Association is pushing for U.S. trade representatives to negotiate better trading terms with Europe, looking for the European Union to ease the strict restrictions it imposes on genetically modified soybeans. The group petitioned a U.S. trade representative who is part of a new working group with the European Union to work on its behalf. 

The debt crisis in the euro zone has put the financial markets of Italy, Spain and most recently France under pressure after the bailouts of Greece, Portugal and Ireland.

We’ll see how the next couple weeks are vital for the European Union, and how this will affect Mid-Missouri. Plus, we’ll dig a little deeper into the ongoing story about Mamtek and how this affects other cities in Missouri.

Hosted by Nick Adams.