KBIA file photo

ST. LOUIS - The U.S. Supreme Court has refused to halt Earl Forrest's execution hours before the Missouri man is scheduled to die by injection.

The court issued its ruling without comment today. Forrest is scheduled to die tonight at the state prison in Bonne Terre for the 2002 killings of Harriett Smith and Michael Wells in a drug dispute and Dent County Sheriff's Deputy Joann Barnes in a shootout that followed at Forrest's home.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, denied a clemency request earlier today.

execution gurney
California Department of Corrections / Wikimedia Commons

Attorneys for two Missouri death row inmates are suggesting reviving the gas chamber as an alternative method of execution.

execution gurney
California Department of Corrections / Wikimedia Commons

The execution of a Missouri man remains in limbo following the U.S. Supreme Court's last-minute decision to delay the lethal injection.

MO Department of Corrections

The Missouri Supreme Court has denied the latest legal challenges from a man scheduled to be executed tomorrow for raping and killing a 15-year-old Kansas City girl in 1989. 

The judges ruled Friday to overrule a motion that sought a stay of execution for Roderick Nunley. The court also rejected his request for a writ of habeas corpus, which allows prisoners to challenge their convictions on constitutional grounds.

Missouri Department of Corrections

The Missouri Supreme Court has set an Oct. 6 execution for a former St. Louis jailer convicted of hiring someone to kill his ex-wife. 

Flickr / steakpinball

A circuit judge has ruled that Missouri violated open records laws by refusing to disclose the pharmacies that make the state's execution drug.

Cole County Circuit Judge Jon Beetem ruled Wednesday that the Department of Corrections broke the Sunshine Law.

Updated 10:15 p.m. -- David Zink has been executed by lethal injection, becoming the fifth convicted killer put to death in Missouri this year and the 17th since the state resumed lethal injections in November 2013.

Missouri Supreme Court
Americasroof / Wikimedia Commons

  The Missouri Supreme Court has set an execution date of July 14 for David Zink, convicted of abducted and killing a southwest Missouri woman in 2001.

Missouri Department of Corrections

The Missouri Supreme Court has set a June execution date for a man convicted of fatally stabbing his girlfriend and her 2-year-old daughter in 2000. 

Last month, Utah Gov. Gary Herbert signed a bill bringing back the firing squad as a method of execution. The state abandoned firing squads in 2004 but now, it has returned as the backup option — partly because of a shortage of lethal injection drugs, the state's default execution method.

Utah is now the only state in the U.S. that authorizes execution by firing squad.

Missouri Department of Corrections

The Missouri Supreme Court has scheduled a May 12th execution for a former St. Louis jailer convicted of hiring someone to kill his ex-wife in 2000. 

No state has carried out more executions than Missouri this year. Early this morning, Missouri carried out its eighth execution of 2014.

Earl Ringo was put to death for killing two people during a robbery that went bad in Columbia.

As preparations for a man’s execution begin, his pen pal is hoping she will be able to speak with him for the last time tonight.

A motion for judgment has been filed in a lawsuit accusing the state of violating Sunshine Laws for refusing to provide information related to Missouri executions.

The filing seeks to expedite a lawsuit filed earlier this year by stating there is no dispute in the core facts of the case, which calls on the court to order the Department of Corrections to release details about the drugs used in lethal injections. It also seeks to identify the pharmacies and laboratories that create and test the drugs.

Missouri Department of Corrections

The Missouri Supreme Court has canceled an execution for one death row inmate and scheduled a different man to be put to death next month.

Missouri Department of Corrections

A Missouri inmate has been put to death for raping and killing a neighbor in 1995, the first lethal injection in the U.S. since an execution in Arizona went awry last month.

Missouri Department of Corrections

The U.S. Supreme Court is weighing whether to intervene in the scheduled Missouri execution of an Illinois man condemned to death in the 1995 killing of a suburban St. Louis college student.

For the fourth time this year, an inmate's lethal injection did not go as planned. Last night, it was Arizona, but the state has company.

An Ohio inmate took 25 minutes to die in January. In Oklahoma, there were two apparent botches: In one,  an inmate said, "I feel my whole body burning," and in another, the prisoner took more than 40 minutes to die.

But Arizona's execution took even longer. Joseph Wood's execution began at 1:52 p.m., and he died nearly two hours later at 3:49 p.m.

Late Wednesday, Missouri executed John Middleton, 54, after courts debated whether he was mentally competent as well as claims that he was actually innocent.

According to the Department of Corrections, the execution began at 6:58 p.m. and ended at 7:06 p.m.

Missouri Department of Corrections

The Missouri Supreme Court has set an Aug. 6 execution for a St. Louis area man convicted of raping and killing a neighbor nearly two decades ago.

Missouri carried out another execution early Wednesday. It was the state's fifth this year, and the nation's second since Oklahoma botched an execution in April.

Inmate John Winfield was put to death for murdering two people —  Arthea Sanders and Shawnee Murphy — in St. Louis County in 1996.

According to a state official, Winfield was pronounced dead at 12:10 a.m.

Tom Kackley / KBIA

Controversy continues to surround the death penalty around the nation since a botched execution in Oklahoma in April.

A federal judge has stayed Missouri's upcoming execution over concerns that the Department of Corrections obstructed the clemency process.

Inmate John Winfield was scheduled to be put to death on June 18 for killing two people in St. Louis County. Before an execution can occur in Missouri, the governor must first make a decision on clemency -- whether or not the inmate's life should be spared.

Joe Gratz / Flickr

A federal appeals court in St. Louis has set a September hearing in the case of a Missouri man whose late May execution was delayed by the U.S. Supreme Court hours before he was scheduled to die.

Flickr / steakpinball

Missouri's attorney general says the state should establish its own laboratory to produce chemicals for use in executions rather than rely on an "uneasy cooperation" with medical professionals and pharmaceutical companies.

Jonathunder / Wikimedia commons

What happens now to a Missouri inmate after a rare last-minute stay of execution from the U.S. Supreme Court will be up to other judges.

hitthatswitch / flickr

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is standing firm with plans to execute Russell Bucklew this week, despite claims from the condemned man's attorneys that he could suffer during the process because of a rare medical condition.

Bucklew is scheduled to die by a lethal dose of pentobarbital at 12:01 a.m. Wednesday for killing a southeast Missouri man during a violent crime spree in 1996.

execution gurney
California Department of Corrections / Wikimedia Commons

The American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri and the Missourians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty joined together last week to send a letter to Governor Jay Nixon requesting a suspension on executions until the procedures are made more transparent.

Josey Herrera / KBIA

The state of Missouri has carried out its fourth execution this year. Just past midnight, William Rousan was executed for the 1993 murder of a 62-year-old woman in southeast Missouri. He was also convicted of killing the woman’s husband in a plan to steal their cows.

execution gurney
California Department of Corrections / Wikimedia Commons

An Oklahoma judge on Wednesday ruled that the state's execution law is unconstitutional because it prevents inmates from finding out the source of the drugs used in executions.

The Missouri attorney general's office isn't commenting on any potential implications from a court ruling about Oklahoma's execution policies.

Missouri's execution law remains in place, but the state has a similar privacy provision that state officials have cited while declining to release the identity of the business that supplies its execution drugs.