execution

Although the state's previous drug supplier says it will not supply for the next execution, Missouri says it's found another willing pharmacy.

On Monday, the Apothecary Shoppe in Oklahoma reached a settlement with an inmate who had sued the pharmacy. Although the terms were confidential, the pharmacy agreed to not sell to Missouri for its upcoming execution.

In a court filing Wednesday evening, the state said inmate Michael Taylor was trying to cut off the supply of the state's execution drug.

Yanivba via Flickr

A Missouri state senator wants to give the Corrections Department flexibility on how it carries out executions.

Republican Sen. Kurt Schaefer introduced legislation Wednesday that would allow the department to execute inmates by any lawful means. Current law permits executions only by lethal gas or chemicals.

Schaefer, of Columbia, says legal questions over Missouri's current use of pentobarbital shouldn't be used to block capital punishment in the state. He says his bill would give the department the necessary flexibility to carry out death sentences.

Missouri's recent executions have sparked controversy lately -- not just for the secrecy and the source of the execution drug but also for the state's speed in carrying them out.

The Department of Corrections has carried out three executions in as many months. In all those cases, the inmate still had appeals pending at the time the state executed him.

Update: Governor says the state is prepared to proceed regardless.

Update: Pharmacy hopes documents will be secret

A federal judge has ordered an Oklahoma-based pharmacy not to sell the Missouri Department of Corrections its execution drug, at least until a hearing scheduled for next week.

Despite the controversy over how Missouri has carried out its past three executions, a state House hearing on Monday revealed little that hasn't already been reported:

propofol
Nottingham Vet School / Flikr

An Oklahoma compounding pharmacy linked to Missouri's new lethal injection drug is now seeking a license to do business in the neighboring state.

An Oklahoma compounding pharmacy has supplied Missouri with the drug it's used three times to execute inmates, despite the fact that the pharmacy isn't licensed here.

Now the Apothecary Shoppe is attempting to become licensed in Missouri.

According to records obtained by St. Louis Public Radio, the Oklahoma Board of Pharmacy received a letter from the Apothecary Shoppe on Jan. 13, when the pharmacy said it was planning on registering in both Missouri and Texas.

execution gurney
California Department of Corrections / Wikimedia Commons

A Missouri man has been executed for fatally shooting a jeweler during a 1991 robbery, marking the state's third lethal injection in as many months.

Updated at 1:41 a.m., Thurs., Jan. 30

Missouri inmate Herbert Smulls was put to death late Wednesday night after the U.S. Supreme Court removed two stays. He was pronounced dead at 10:20 p.m.

It was the state's third execution in as many months. The pace of one a month is a sharp uptick from recent years past, when the state has had problems getting a hold of execution drugs.

gavel
Flickr / steakpinball

A federal judge in Missouri has denied a motion to grant a 60-day stay of execution for convicted killer Herbert Smulls.

Late Friday night, a group of federal judges found that the compounding pharmacy making Missouri's execution drug can remain secret, but new emails point to one pharmacy as the likely supplier.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Death penalty opponents are using the 25th anniversary of Missouri's resumption of capital punishment to highlight their desire to halt executions.

George Mercer was executed on Jan. 6, 1989, for the 1978 rape and slaying of waitress Karen Keeten in the Kansas City area. Mercer's execution was Missouri's first after a nationwide moratorium on capital punishment was lifted in 1976.

Since then, Missouri has executed 70 inmates.

Death penalty opponents planned a news conference Monday at the Missouri Capitol.

execution gurney
California Department of Corrections / Wikimedia Commons

Missouri has put two people to death since last November, with another execution scheduled for late January. St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon's Chris McDaniel and Véronique LaCapra have been looking into the state's secretive and controversial lethal injection process. They've discovered the state may be ignoring its own laws in carrying out the death penalty.

 

In an investigation spanning the past few months, St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon has discovered the state of Missouri may be ignoring its own laws in carrying out the death penalty by buying execution drugs from a pharmacy not licensed to do business in Missouri.

Old prison
File Photo / KBIA

 

Use of the death penalty declined nationally in 2013, but the punishment has seen a resurgence in Missouri.

The Death Penalty Information Center on Thursday released a report showing that 39 people were executed in the U.S. in 2013, just the second time in 19 years that fewer than 40 were put to death.

Missouri has executed two men in the past month — Joseph Paul Franklin on Nov. 29 and Allen Nicklasson on Dec. 11. The executions were the first in Missouri since 2011, and the most in a single year since five in 2005.

A Kansas City man has been executed for killing a good Samaritan who stopped to help him and his friends after their car had broken down in 1994.

Null Value / Flickr

The state of Missouri is still awaiting a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on whether it can proceed with the execution of death row inmate Allen Nicklasson.

Nicklasson had been scheduled to die by injection at 12:01 a.m. Wednesday for the 1994 murder of businessman Richard Drummond, who was shot to death after he stopped to help when a car carrying Nicklasson and two others stalled in central Missouri.

A three-judge panel of the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals issued a stay over concerns about Nicklasson's legal representation.

gavel
Flickr / steakpinball

The execution of a convicted killer in Missouri is on hold at least for several hours.

gavel
Flickr / steakpinball

A panel of federal judges has stayed a Missouri man's execution a little more than a day before he was set to die.

steakpinball_0 / Flickr

A Jefferson City man has been sentenced to die for the 2009 killing of a woman with whom he had a relationship while she was separated from her husband, who was also shot to death.

Cole County Circuit Judge Patricia Joyce agreed with a jury's recommendation in imposing the sentence Tuesday on 58-year-old David Hosier. KRCG-TV reports Hosier addressed the court for about 10 minutes, denying he shot Angela Gilpin and claiming the real killer remains at large.

Null Value / Flickr

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has refused to halt the execution of white supremacist serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin, calling his crime in Missouri a "cowardly and calculated shooting."

Propfol
Nottingham Vet School / Flickr

This week on CoMo Explained we explain what all the fuss about Propofol is and how it's got Missouri in the national eye again.

Two weeks ago, Gov. Jay Nixon instructed the Missouri Department of Corrections to come up with a new procedure for carrying out lethal injections.

On Tuesday, the department announced that it had chosen a new execution drug: pentobarbital. But the state also made a change that will end up making it harder, if not impossible, to know where the drugs come from.

On Tuesday, the Missouri Department of Corrections announced that it had selected a new drug for upcoming executions: pentobarbital.

The change comes following criticism of the questionable methods Missouri had obtained the drug it had previously planned to use, as well as concern that its use could harm hospitals throughout the U.S. The state had planned to use a common anesthetic named propofol, which has never been used to carry out an execution.

Executions on hold as Mo. seeks new death drug

Oct 15, 2013
propofol
Nottingham Vet School / Flikr

Missouri's decision to not use the anesthetic propofol for capital punishment leaves the state with dwindling options as it seeks to execute two convicted murderers.

Gov. Jay Nixon last week halted what was to have been the first U.S. execution to use propofol following threats from the European Union to limit the drug's export. Nixon ordered the state corrections department to come up with a different lethal injection protocol.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA file photo

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is halting the execution of convicted killer Allen Nicklasson, citing concerns about the use of propofol as an execution drug.

The decision was announced Friday. Nixon also ordered the Missouri Department of Corrections to come up with a different way to perform lethal injections that does not include propofol.

Nicklasson's execution, scheduled for Oct. 23, had been set to be the country's first-ever using propofol.

propofol
Nottingham Vet School / Flikr

  The Missouri Department of Corrections is sending a shipment of propofol back to the distributor, 11 months after the company urgently requested for the anesthetic to be returned.

Missouri plans to be the first state to use propofol in an execution on Oct. 23. The department says in a news release Wednesday that it has remaining inventory, but it doesn't say if enough remains for two executions scheduled in the coming weeks.

syringe of propofol
Nottingham Vet School / Flickr

The Missouri Supreme Court's decision to move ahead with two executions this year is being questioned by some death penalty observers and opponents.

The state High Court on Wednesday set execution dates for condemned killers Allen Nicklasson and Joseph Franklin. Missouri plans to become the first-ever state to use the anesthetic propofol for lethal injection. Propofol was used in the death of pop star Michael Jackson.

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Schoeller discusses Speaker succession
  • Mo. Supreme Court declines to set execution dates
  • Missouri Republicans rally to start fall campaigns

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