FDA

This piece comes from the Center for Public Integrity, a nonpartisan, nonprofit investigative news organization.

When it comes to the current controversy over antibiotic use on farm animals, milk is in a special category.

Lactating cows, unlike hogs, cattle or chickens that are raised for their meat, don't receive antibiotics unless they are actually sick. That's because drug residues immediately appear in the cow's milk — a violation of food safety rules.

Milk shipments are tested for six of the most widely used antibiotics, and any truckload that tests positive is rejected. So when cows are treated, farmers discard their milk for several days until the residues disappear.

Dan Ox / Flickr

Megan Oberg had a rough time after her first two deliveries. One moment she'd be happy, in another, not really. And she said that's pretty typical.

 

“Most women who have given birth can tell you some time during the first two weeks you tend to have some ups and downs as far as mood swings, as the hormones leave the system,” Oberg said.

 

For her third pregnancy she decided she wanted to try something new.

 


University of Liverpool Faculty of Health & Life Sciences/Flickr

Say cheese! That’s what Columbia-based Nanova Biomaterials Incorporated is doing after the Food and Drug Administration approved their first product, a dental varnish, in October. Missouri Business Alert’s Kaitlin Rounds and Yizhu Wang report on the company and its plans for growth.   

Missouri will receive $693,000 as part of a nationwide settlement over the kidney transplant drug, Rapamune.

Neighboring Illinois will get more than $1.3 million.

The drug company Pfizer, whose subsidiary Wyeth makes Rapamune, has agreed to pay out a total of $35 million to 41 U.S. states and the District of Columbia as part of the settlement.

Missouri residents who have exhausted conventional disease cures will have access to experimental drugs under legislation signed on Monday by Gov. Jay Nixon.

The so-called Right to Try legislation gives patients and their doctors the ability to procure drugs that have yet to gain approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration if the pharmaceutical manufacturer agrees to provide the product.

Chrisf608 via Flickr

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon has vetoed legislation barring people younger than 18 from buying electronic cigarettes while also exempting the nicotine products from other tobacco sales restrictions.

Nixon called the Senate bill a "thinly disguised and cynical attempt" to exempt e-cigarettes from the state's 17 cent-per-pack cigarette tax as well as further public health restrictions. His rejection on Monday fell on the deadline for the governor take action on bills passed by state lawmakers earlier this year.

Milk that Central Dairy delivers is kept behind doors secured with three-inch long padlocks.
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

This is the latest installment of Harvest Public Media’s Field Notes, in which we talk about important issues related to food production. 

A bioterror attack that introduced a virus like foot-and-mouth disease could devastate the U.S. livestock industry. Regulators are proposing new rules meant to protect the food system from terror attack.
Jeremy Bernfeld/Harvest Public Media

This is the latest installment of Harvest Public Media’s Field Notes, in which we talk about important issues related to food production. 

andrewmalone/Flickr

This is the latest installment of Harvest Public Media’s Field Notes, in which we talk about important issues related to food production.

KBIA

Seventy-five members of Congress, including Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri, are asking the Food and Drug Administration to allow further comment on sweeping food safety rules that farmers say could drive them out of business.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

On this week's show we’ll hear about new food safety regulations and how they could impact grain producers, and learn about a study that looked at online avatars and personal health.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

New food safety regulations are about to be announced by the Food and Drug Administration. These regulations—covering everything from sanitation to record-keeping—are part of the Food Safety and Modernization Act, which became law two years ago. While the produce and meat industries get the lion’s share of attention, commodity grains now fall under the FDA’s watch.

blue tray
Chelsea Stuart / KBIA

Like the old joke about restaurant complaints (“The food is awful, and the portions are so small!”), kids across the country are complaining their school lunches have too many fruits and vegetables, and they’re leaving lunch hungry.

hospital interior
fotos GOVBA / flickr

Many Missouri hospitals are reporting shortages of necessary pharmaceutical drugs. The Missouri Hospital Association says such shortages are keeping hospitals from effectively delivering care in a safe and timely way to its patients.

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

Pick up your favorite packaged food and read the ingredient list.

If you stumbled over any of the words or a color jumped out at you, you might be looking at what’s known as a food additive.  

Newscast for January 19, 2012

Jan 19, 2012

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Missouri gets 'F' for tobacco control policies, in new report from American Lung Association
  • FDA challenging the use of antibiotics in animals

  • MO chief justice wants to shrink prison

 

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

The Food and Drug Administration is publishing an order this month that limits the way farmers can use certain antibiotics to treat animals, and eggs.