ferguson

(Updated 4:12 p.m. with comments from attorneys.)

The three agencies that made up the "unified command" during protests in Ferguson over the summer will have to provide warning before using tear gas or other chemical agents to disperse peaceful crowds.

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The attorney for a man accused of shooting and wounding two police officers during a demonstration in Ferguson says his client had nothing to do with the incident and police should be searching for the real shooter. 

About four months before the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, police less than 15 miles down I-70 in St. Charles shot another man named Brown. The event barely drew any attention from anyone except immediate family and friends.

Since Michael Brown was shot and killed last year, people within the St. Louis region have been immersed in social and public policy introspection.

Wikimedia Commons / Loavesofbread

  One of about two dozen journalists arrested while covering the unrest in Ferguson plans to fight the charges at trial. 

Why did the Justice Department conclude that Michael Brown didn’t cry out “Don’t shoot” and that, if he had his hands up, it was only for a moment before he began moving back toward Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson?

At first glance, state Sen. Bob Dixon wouldn’t be an obvious choice to spearhead legislation responding to the unrest in and around Ferguson.

The appeals court judge now hearing municipal cases in Ferguson has limited the amount of fines and fees the city can collect from defendants facing traffic, animal control or housing ordinance violations.

University and Students Continue Conversation on Race

Mar 18, 2015
loftin
Wikimedia Commons

University of Missouri students asked Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin for policy changes during the race relations forum on Tuesday night.

Loftin, administrators, faculty and students met for the third time on the topic since the announcement former Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson would not be indicted for the shooting death of Michael Brown last year.

Updated at 3:45 p.m.

The St. Louis County Police Department says an arrest has been made in connection with the shooting of two officers during a protest in Ferguson, Mo., last week.

WILEY PRICE | ST. LOUIS AMERICAN

With measured remarks and a conciliatory tone, police, political leaders and civil-rights activists on Thursday sought to tamp down tensions after two police officers were shot in front of the Ferguson Police Department during a protest.

For the latest updates on this developing story, see our live blog.

Two St. Louis-area police officers monitoring protesters at the Ferguson police department were shot shortly after midnight. While the injuries were termed serious, both officers were released from the hospital later in the morning.

Looking toward Thursday night, when at least one group has called for a candlelight vigil at the department, law enforcement officials announced that the County Police Department and the Missouri Highway Patrol would take over security around the headquarters on South Florissant Road.

Wikimedia Commons / Loavesofbread

The police chief in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson has resigned in the wake of a scathing Justice Department report prompted by the fatal shooting of an unarmed black 18-year-old by a white police officer. A city official with knowledge of the situation said Thomas Jackson submitted his resignation letter today.

The shakeup of Ferguson’s government continued in earnest on Tuesday with the resignation of city manager John Shaw.

It’s easily the most significant departure yet from a Ferguson city official since a Department of Justice report sharply criticized the city's police department and municipal court system.

Boone Courthouse
KBIA

Missouri governor Jay Nixon says municipal courts need to be reformed to restore trust between citizens and the government eroded by abuses like those detailed in a Department of Justice report on Ferguson.

A New York Times investigation shows across the state systemic policing issues stretch further than Ferguson. “Ferguson is one dot in the state, and there are many municipalities in the region engaged in the same practices a mile away,” said Vanita Gupta, the Justice Department’s top civil rights prosecutor.

Wikimedia Commons / Loavesofbread

Ferguson city leaders will meet with Justice Department officials in about two weeks and provide a plan for ways to improve the police department following a DOJ report released this week.

Mayor James Knowles says that the goal is to work out an agreement for a plan forward. A specific meeting date has not been set.

Knowles says city leaders are still going over the report "line by line." Knowles says Police Chief Tom Jackson still lead the department, but declined to discuss Jackson's future.

Former Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson will not face criminal charges for shooting and killing Michael Brown in August — but he may still end up in a courtroom over the incident.

Robin Kane

Events in Ferguson, Missouri played a big role at the fourth annual Based on a True Story conference on Thursday, March 5. The Based on a True Story conference is a series of panels discussing various topics involving the intersection of documentary film and journalism. Thursday morning’s panel took place at the Missouri School of Journalism.

Missouri Capitol
David Shane / Flickr

The Missouri House or Senate will not consider any new bills to address concerns by the U.S. Justice Department over the operations of the Ferguson Police Department.  That’s because it’s now too late to file any new legislation this year.  Senate President Pro-tem Tom Dempsey says a few already-filed Ferguson-related bills are being worked on.

“You’ll see some debate on the floor and some other issues associated with the aftermath of Ferguson,” Dempsey said.

Ferguson Mayor James Knowles provided little indication how his city would respond to a scathing Department of Justice report documenting pervasive racial bias in the city’s police department and municipal court system. But he listed several steps the city was already taking to deal with allegations of bias.

Seven months after Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson shot and killed Michael Brown, the U.S. Department of Justice today released two investigations - one that cleared Wilson and the other that accused Ferguson police and courts of violating constitutional rights.

The Ferguson police department and municipal court engaged in such a widespread pattern of unconstitutional conduct that it lost the trust of the people, the Justice Department concluded after a seven-month investigation.

(Updated at 7:30 p.m. with comments from St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch)

The U.S. Justice Department’s report into the fatal of shooting of Michael Brown by then-police officer Darren Wilson makes two basic findings: investigators were not convinced that Wilson committed a federal crime; and that even if they were to indict Wilson, they didn’t believe they would be able to win at trial.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

A Justice Department report says blacks in Ferguson are disproportionately subjected to excessive police force, baseless traffic stops, and citations for petty infractions -- like walking down the middle of the street.

KBIA

Michael Brown's uncle says a Department of Justice decision not to charge the Ferguson police officer who fatally shot his nephew is deflating.

(This post was last updated at 7 p.m. ET.)

Darren Wilson, the former Ferguson, Mo., police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown last August, will not face federal civil rights charges over the killing. That's according to the Justice Department, which has now released its reviews of both the shooting and the local police department.

While Wilson will avoid federal charges, the Justice Department review found that the Ferguson Police Department engages in "a pattern of unconstitutional policing."

A law enforcement official tells The Associated Press that a Justice Department investigation has found patterns of racial bias in the Ferguson, Missouri, police department and at the municipal jail and court.

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On this week's Thinking Out Loud, hear part two of Darren Hellwege's conversation with the Reverend C.W. Dawson. The conversation touches on the role of Martin Luther King and others in re-energizing the black churches' engagement in the civil rights movement, weaving black history into the broader telling of history and why we need to better monitor election fraud in America.


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