ferguson

PM Newscast for October 22, 2014

1 hour ago

Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including;

  • Boone County news conference on Ebola
  • New autopsy details in Ferguson case
  • Community Improvement District appoints new executive director
  • Man's ashes to be shot into sky with fireworks
  • First ward group looks into recalling councilwoman
  • Aspen Heights loses marketing privileges

KBIA

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon says he will create an independent commission to study issues that have surfaced since the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson.

CINCINNATI – Cincinnati’s police reform following a deadly police shooting and riots in 2001 has lessons for Ferguson and St. Louis. Here is what the reformers there say:

A sit-in to protest police shootings is in its fifth day at Saint Louis University.

Amid rain showers and a tornado watch, police in Ferguson, Mo., made dozens of arrests Monday afternoon and into the evening of people who had gathered to protest the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, the black 18-year-old who was killed by a white police officer in August.

Shawn Semmler / Flickr

  Several hundred people, led by clergy members, marched from a Ferguson church to the city's police headquarters on Monday, part of a four-day weekend of rallies and marches.

An off-duty white police officer in St. Louis shot and killed an 18-year-old black man who police say opened fire during a chase in south St. Louis. The incident sparked renewed protests in a city already rocked by anger over the fatal police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown in the suburb of Ferguson in August.

St. Louis Public Radio live-blogged the protests here.

roy blunt
TalkMediaNews / Flickr

  US Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Missouri, met with local law enforcement in Jefferson City on Monday to discuss when police use military surplus equipment.

The meeting, which was closed to the media, comes almost two months after police responded to protests following the death of Michael Brown with tear gas, armored vehicles and other military equipment acquired through Department of Defense and Homeland Security programs.

Blunt said law enforcement officials he has talked to only use the equipment for defensive purposes and that programs like these are beneficial.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

  Eight more people have been arrested following another night of protests in Ferguson.

No violence was reported from the Sunday night protest that was at times boisterous in the St. Louis suburb where unrest has been common in the month-and-a-half since 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a Ferguson police officer.

Protesters banged drums, pots and pans. Police said they would enforce a noise ordinance at 11 p.m., and police made a few arrests involving those who continued to make noise.

The head of the Missouri State Highway Patrol says law officers are "planning for the worst" in anticipation of a grand jury decision on whether to indict a white police officer who shot a black 18-year-old.

PM Newscast September 24, 2014

Sep 24, 2014

  • Five arrested in Ferguson protests
  • Interstate 70 briefly shut down
  • Ashland YMCA looking to expand
  • ACLU challenges Missouri marriage amendment in KC
  • Columbia Public Schools increase security
  • SEMO student enrollment reaches all-time high

Police forcibly dispersed dozens of protesters in Ferguson early Wednesday morning after hours of  confrontation and the smashing of a window at the Beauty Town shop. Tensions had been running high since Tuesday morning when a memorial for Michael Brown burned down close to where he was killed.

Joe Gratz / Flickr

ST. LOUIS (AP) — A judge has extended into January the term of the grand jury considering whether Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson should be charged in the shooting death of Michael Brown.

The grand jury was due to have its four-month term expire Sept. 10, the same day St. Louis County Circuit Judge Carolyn Whittington extended the term to Jan. 7. St. Louis County Court Administrator Paul Fox says it's the longest extension allowed under Missouri law.

The St. Louis County Council convened for a regular meeting on Aug. 19. It was only a day after a particularly turbulent night in Ferguson, one filled with protests, tear gas and many arrests over the fatal shooting of a black teenager by a white police officer.

Only a couple dozen people showed up to the council meeting. Three spoke during the public comment section. One was Marquis Govan.

He lowered the microphone to match his 11-year-old height before speaking.

(Updated 9 p.m. on Wednesday with comments from Mayor Knowles)

When Louis Wilson spoke at a Ferguson City Council meeting -- a meeting filled with rousing moments and white-hot anger -- he turned his attention directly to Mayor James Knowles.

Null_Value via Flickr

The Justice Department is launching a broad investigation into the practices of the Ferguson, Missouri, police department.

That's according to Attorney General Eric Holder. He announced the investigation following the shooting last month of an unarmed black 18-year-old by a white police officer in the St. Louis suburb.

It's a separate inquiry from an ongoing federal civil rights investigation into the circumstances of the August 9th shooting of Michael Brown by Officer Darren Wilson. A local grand jury is also investigating.

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — City officials in Ferguson, Missouri, are pledging their full cooperation with a federal civil-rights investigation into their police department following the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Attorney General Eric Holder was expected to announce the investigation into the department Thursday afternoon at a news conference in Washington.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon says that Centene Corporation’s plans to build a new claims processing center in Ferguson doesn’t just create jobs.

It’s also about sending a message.

"We're very heartened by their willingness to make an investment,” Nixon said Tuesday. “It now sends a signal, not only in St. Louis but around the world that North County is open for business."

Nixon offered up praise for Centene at the beginning of his luncheon address to members of the Regional Chamber and Growth Association.

In the wake of the Michael Brown shooting, residents of Ferguson are still dealing with the emotional effects of the conflict.

Bianca Huff and her three-year-old son live in Canfield Green, the apartment complex where Michael Brown was shot and killed on August 9. Five days after Brown’s death, KBIA producer Bram Sable-Smith talked with Huff about how she has been helping her son understand everything that has happened.

“He’s seen the police before, so he was like ‘Did the police do this?’ and ‘How did the boy pass?’ and just different questions,” Huff said. “And he be like ‘So he gone?’ And I said ‘Yeah, he gone but he in a better place’ And he just say ‘Ok’ and keep going about the day. So as long as he don’t get too distraught, I just let him do that.”

Fortunately, there are people already on the ground in Ferguson helping people like Huff and her family cope with the recent tragedy in their community.

More than one hundred people gathered in Peace Park yesterday for Artists for Justice. The event featured performances of music and poetry as well as opportunities to contribute to collaborative artwork. 

According to Kenneth Bryant, one of the organizers for Artists for Justice, the event grew from a desire to create an outlet for the community to respond to the August 9th death of teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. 

Paul Sableman / Flickr

Centene Corp. plans to build a claims processing center in Ferguson, in the wake of the Michael Brown shooting.

Scott Davidson via Flickr

Another St. Louis area police officer is out of a job over threats to Ferguson shooting protesters found online.

A forum Thursday evening peering into Ferguson’s longstanding tensions as well as the St. Louis region’s racial divisions became angry and heated, with most of a crowd’s ire directed at the town’s mayor.

Join us here as we live blog from our event Thursday evening, Ferguson and Beyond: A Community Conversation. The event will be from 6-8 p.m. at Wellspring Church in Ferguson, Mo.

NPR's Michel Martin will host and moderate the event.

File photo

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says the state and St. Louis-area economic development groups and lenders are committing up to $1 million in support to businesses affected by racial unrest that followed the shooting death of an unarmed black 18-year-old by a white police officer.

Nixon says he's designated State Treasurer Clint Zweifel to oversee the distribution of no-interest loans to Ferguson businesses harmed by looting and rioting since the August 9th death of Michael Brown.

Null Value via Flickr

A federal lawsuit alleges that police in Ferguson and St. Louis County used excessive force and falsely arrested innocent bystanders amid attempts to quell widespread unrest after the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Scott Davidson via Flickr

A suburban St. Louis police officer shown on cellphone video pointing his rifle at demonstrators in Ferguson and threatening them is now out of a job.

St. Ann Police Chief Aaron Jimenez confirmed in an interview with The Associated Press that police Lieutenant Ray Albers resigned Thursday. A phone call seeking comment from Albers was not returned.

The confrontation happened August 19th during protests that followed the Ferguson police shooting death of Michael Brown.

What one journalist, and former KBIA reporter, witnessed other reporters do in Ferguson, Mo. led him to stop filing stories. Al Jazeera freelancer Ryan Schuessler wrote a personal blog post detailing the disrespectful actions he saw and why he decided to leave (for now). Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

When the Columbia Daily Tribune published an editorial cartoon about looting in Ferguson, Managing Editor Jim Robertson said the intent was to be provocative. What some readers saw was racism. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

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