ferguson

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Another St. Louis area police officer is out of a job over threats to Ferguson shooting protesters found online.

A forum Thursday evening peering into Ferguson’s longstanding tensions as well as the St. Louis region’s racial divisions became angry and heated, with most of a crowd’s ire directed at the town’s mayor.

Join us here as we live blog from our event Thursday evening, Ferguson and Beyond: A Community Conversation. The event will be from 6-8 p.m. at Wellspring Church in Ferguson, Mo.

NPR's Michel Martin will host and moderate the event.

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Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says the state and St. Louis-area economic development groups and lenders are committing up to $1 million in support to businesses affected by racial unrest that followed the shooting death of an unarmed black 18-year-old by a white police officer.

Nixon says he's designated State Treasurer Clint Zweifel to oversee the distribution of no-interest loans to Ferguson businesses harmed by looting and rioting since the August 9th death of Michael Brown.

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A federal lawsuit alleges that police in Ferguson and St. Louis County used excessive force and falsely arrested innocent bystanders amid attempts to quell widespread unrest after the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Scott Davidson via Flickr

A suburban St. Louis police officer shown on cellphone video pointing his rifle at demonstrators in Ferguson and threatening them is now out of a job.

St. Ann Police Chief Aaron Jimenez confirmed in an interview with The Associated Press that police Lieutenant Ray Albers resigned Thursday. A phone call seeking comment from Albers was not returned.

The confrontation happened August 19th during protests that followed the Ferguson police shooting death of Michael Brown.

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What one journalist, and former KBIA reporter, witnessed other reporters do in Ferguson, Mo. led him to stop filing stories. Al Jazeera freelancer Ryan Schuessler wrote a personal blog post detailing the disrespectful actions he saw and why he decided to leave (for now). Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Courtesy Columbia Daily Tribune

When the Columbia Daily Tribune published an editorial cartoon about looting in Ferguson, Managing Editor Jim Robertson said the intent was to be provocative. What some readers saw was racism. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Michael Brown’s death at the hands of a Ferguson police officer brought about an intense examination of the conduct, racial composition and “militarization” of local police departments.

But one topic that hasn’t been talked about that much is how elected representatives exert fairly little direct control over the region’s law enforcement agencies.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has nominated former St. Louis Police Chief Dan Isom to be the state’s new public-safety director, a move that will put Isom in charge of a number of diverse state agencies – from the Highway Patrol to the Gaming Commission.

Isom served 24 years on the St. Louis police force, and retired as chief 18 months ago. He holds doctoral degrees in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Missouri-St. Louis, where he has served as a professor for the past year.

A group of attorneys is asking Ferguson’s mayor to “wipe the slate clean” and grant clemency to certain people who broke the city ordinances, such as speeding or getting a parking ticket.  

Courtesy Columbia Daily Tribune

This editorial cartoon, published in the August 20, 2014 edition of the Columbia Daily Tribune drew cries of racism from readers who worry the imagery paints Missouri as a "racist and backwater region."

Managing Editor Jim Robertson said he thought it was provocative, but its intent was not racism.

The city council in Ferguson, has postponed a meeting scheduled for Tuesday, citing a need for a larger venue due to interest from residents following Brown’s death.

Ferguson, Mo., found a degree of civic calm this week after days and nights of angry clashes between protestors and the police.

Now the city is working to restore trust with residents after a white police officer fatally shot black teenager Michael Brown on Aug. 9. City leaders and residents say one way to do that might be to equip police with personal video cameras.

"All the cops have to have body cameras and dashboard cameras," says resident Alonzo Bond, "so everybody can be accountable."

Fifty years ago this summer — a half-century before the protests in Ferguson, Mo. — riots broke out in seven cities in New York, New Jersey, Illinois and Pennsylvania, sparked by confrontations between black residents and their predominantly white police forces.

In Philadelphia, the violence began after dark, in late August.

"It was a hot day and just wasn't too much activity in the hood, as they say," remembers Kenneth Salaam, who was 15 years old in 1964.

Missouri's U.S. senators are asking Gov. Jay Nixon to seek federal help for businesses damaged during violent protests over the fatal shooting of an unarmed 18-year-old.

In a letter to Nixon Friday, U.S. Senators Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt say businesses in Ferguson have "suffered significant physical damage" during days of civil unrest following the death of Michael Brown. They say many of those businesses are struggling to recover.

Maureen Lewis-Stump / KBIA

  The local chapter of the NAACP sponsored a rally Thursday in support of Michael Brown's family. The rally took place at the amphitheater next to the Boone County Courthouse in Columbia.

KBIA file photo

Missouri's lieutenant governor wants lawmakers to look into events related to the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer.

Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder on Thursday called for the creation of a bipartisan panel of House and Senate members to review the state's law allowing the use of deadly force by police officers.

Kinder also wants the panel to investigate what he describes as a "failure in communication" by state, local and federal law enforcement agencies investigating the August 9th shooting and response to the protests.

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  Gov. Jay Nixon is ordering the Missouri National Guard to begin withdrawing from Ferguson, where nightly scenes of unrest have erupted since a white police officer fatally shot an unarmed black 18-year-old.

Nixon announced what he called a systematic withdrawal of Guard officers on Thursday. He says they've effectively protected the city while other agencies worked to restore trust between law enforcement and residents.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. with comments from Chief Sam Dotson, Jeff Roorda, and Ald. Dionne Flowers.

On Tuesday, two officers from the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department shot and killed Kajieme Powell, who was 25 years old.

Austin Federa / KBIA

So much has happened in Ferguson, Missouri.  Nearly a dozen reporters have been arrested while on the job.  We've learned the identity of Michael Brown's shooter: six-year police veteran Darren Wilson. St. Louis NBC-affiliate KSDK-TV aired video of his home.  Governor Jay Nixon instituted -- and lifted -- curfews and called in the Missouri National Guard.

And we saw it all live -- online, on air and in print.

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A large crowd has gathered at the site where St. Louis police officers shot and killed a knife-wielding man today after a reported convenience store robbery.

This is where you can find the latest updates from our newsroom and reliable community sources on reaction to the police-involved fatal shooting of Michael Brown.

On Monday night, protesters clashed yet again with police in Ferguson, Mo., the St. Louis suburb where Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, was shot by police Aug. 9. National Guard troops deployed by Gov. Jay Nixon didn't get involved, and the officer in charge of security in Ferguson said police came under fire and were targeted by Molotov cocktails.

Update at 1:25 p.m. ET: Latest News: Memorial Planned; Number Of Arrested Reportedly Doubles

Austin Federa / KBIA

 

The Shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri has received international attention

For more than a week now, Missouri citizens have gathered in the city to protest the police department, the killing of an unarmed teenager and racism within the community.

At least six bullets hit Michael Brown, 18, when he was shot to death by a Ferguson, Mo., police officer, according to a preliminary private autopsy report. Only one of those wounds — to the top of the teenager's head — was deemed not survivable by former New York City chief medical examiner Dr. Michael Baden.

Baden and another pathologist hired by Brown's family say they believe that the two bullets that struck Brown in the head "were most likely the last two" to hit him during a confrontation on a street last Saturday.

Ferguson protesters insisted at a raucous meeting on Saturday that Gov. Jay Nixon act quickly to charge Ferguson officer Darren Wilson with murder in the shooting death of Michael Brown. 

St. Louis on the Air will discussed this and other legal issues associated with Ferguson on Monday:

"St. Louis on the Air": The Legal Roundtable discusses issues surrounding Ferguson.

Updated 3:14 a.m ET.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is sending the National Guard to Ferguson to help restore order. He signed the executive order after another night of violence. In a statement, Nixon said the guard's help is needed to "restore peace and order and to protect the citizens of Ferguson."

A preliminary private autopsy performed by Dr. Michael Baden shows that Michael Brown, the unarmed black teenager killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo., was shot at least six times, including twice in the head, reports the New York Times.

The Times has more:

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