flooding

Camille Phillips / St. Louis Public Radio

Flooding on the Mississippi River continues to make its way south from Iowa, putting towns from Quincy to Grafton on alert.

With historic buildings, a post office and a dozen homes all in the path of the flood, Clarksville, Mo, 75 miles north of St. Louis, has more to lose than most.

KBIA file photo

For thousands of Missouri residents, flood insurance premiums are about to go up.

People living in flood plains around the nation will soon see a jump in premiums through the National Flood Insurance Program, though a new law softens the blow a bit.

Under a 2012 statute, premiums could have risen from $2,000 annually to $13,000 each year, but residential rate hikes are now limited to an increase of 18 percent a year.

Nixon seeks disaster declaration for 22 counties

Aug 27, 2013
Jay Nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Gov. Jay Nixon is asking the federal government to issue a major disaster declaration for 22 southern Missouri counties hit hard by this month's floods.

Nixon said Tuesday the costs of emergency response and repairs will be high.

The floods that resulted from nearly two weeks of heavy rain caused widespread damage across the southern tier and left at least three people dead.

Nixon announced his request in Conway, where the wastewater treatment system was heavily damaged.

Photo provided by Miller County Emergency Management.

Officials in south-central Missouri's Pulaski County say at least 90 percent of their roads were damaged by last week's heavy flooding.

Presiding Commissioner Gene Newkirk tells KOLR-TV the damage to 65 percent of the roadways in the county is considered major. About two dozen low-water crossings were washed out and remain closed.

Photo provided by Miller County Emergency Management.

Gov. Jay Nixon toured parts of flood-ravaged south-central Missouri Thursday following days of heavy rains, which damaged dozens of homes and killed a young boy. 

Nixon praised the work of local organizations in their response efforts, including the Red Cross, whose Waynesville shelter housed 27 people Wednesday night. Nixon has called upon the Missouri National Guard for security and traffic control, as numerous streets have been closed, including sections of I-44 earlier this week.

Samantha Edmonson

The Missouri Department of Transportation has begun re-opening many Mid-Missouri roads and highways that were closed due to flooding, but some county roads are still affected, particularly those near the Osage River.

MODOT reopened the 14 mile stretch of I-44 near Jerome southwest of Rolla Thursday morning, which had been closed for nearly 24 hours. Highway 63 near Westphalia was also closed Wednesday afternoon due to water on the road, but that route was also re-opened Thursday morning.

Heavy rains are falling again in waterlogged areas of south-central Missouri, causing power outages and some evacuations.

The Missouri Department of Transportation closed lanes of Interstate 44 south of Rolla after about 6 inches of rain fell in the area Wednesday morning.

Scott Harvey / KSMU

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has declared a state of emergency after heavy rain caused flash flooding in the south-central part of the state. Nixon has spoken with emergency responders in Pulaski County and Waynesville, assuring them the region will get help.

A child was killed and several homes and businesses damaged after several inches of rain last night and this morning caused flooding in Waynesville. The Highway Patrol deployed extra troopers, a rescue helicopter and other assets to help emergency responders. Nixon's executive order also activates the Missouri State Emergency Operations Plan, allowing state agencies to coordinate directly with local jurisdictions on emergency services.

Missouri Association of Counties

The federal government has added a northeast Missouri county to the list of areas eligible for disaster assistance following severe storms and floods in late spring. The addition of Scotland County brings the total to 28 counties in which local governments and nonprofit agencies may seek federal assistance to help cover their response and recovery expenses.

The federal disaster declaration covers damage from storms and flooding from May 29 to June 10.

Drivers asked to be cautious due to heavy rainfall

May 31, 2013
Doug Wallick / Flickr

Heavy rainfall across Missouri has caused flash flooding and road closures in Boone County and could cause flooding along the Mississippi.

Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Heavy rain throughout Mid-Missouri is causing flooding in many areas, and storms are expected to continue throughout Friday. Boone County Emergency Management keeps a live-updated list of road closures, which you can check here at any time for the latest information. As of 7:30am Friday morning, 18 roads were closed in Boone County due to flooding. The Missouri Department of Transportation's traveler information map is also worth checking before heading out on the road today.

File / KBIA

After several days of heavy rain across the lower Missouri River basin, the amount of water released into the river is being reduced to help minimize flooding.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it began reducing the amount of water flowing into the Missouri River on Sunday because of concerns about flooding downstream. On Sunday, the Corps decreased the amount of water being released from Gavins Point Dam, located on the South Dakota-Nebraska state line, from 24,000 cubic feet per second to 12,000 cubic feet per second.

“… that will help the peak stages on the river in some locations and also shorten the duration of the high flows,” the Corps’ Jody Farhat said.

Flooding causes road closures in mid-Missouri

Apr 18, 2013
Stew Dean / Flickr

  Flooding from thunder storms has caused a large number of road closures in mid-Missouri, Thursday.

Regional news from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

Missouri River
KBIA

Some Midwestern rivers that were near record lows are on the verge of flooding after storms dumped up to 3 inches of rain, giving a boost to drought-ravaged waterways.

Tech. Sgt. Oscar Sanchez USDA / Flickr

Flood protection projects are progressing on both sides of the Mississippi River in southeast Missouri and southern Illinois.

Newscast for Friday, July 20, 2012

Jul 20, 2012
Tim Campion

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Engineers check on reconstruction following floods last year
  • McCaskill targets Republican opponents in TV ads
  • Sister company of Missouri lead producer criticized for pollution in Peru
USACE Public Affairs / Flickr

The Army Corps of Engineers visited Cairo, Illinois on yesterday to check on reconstruction projects following last year’s devastating floods. The Corps will invest more than $100 million toward flood protection systems at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.

Air Force Tech. Sgt. Oscar Sanchez / US Department of Agriculture

The top military officer in charge of managing the Missouri River system says the agency needs help from states to improve its ability to predict water runoff.

Rick Fredericksen / Iowa Public Radio

A Columbia lawyer is utilizing a federal program to try to bring so-called, “immigrant investors” to Mid Missouri. Plus, Harvest Public Media reports on the lasting effects of last year’s flooding.

A new report from the Rocky Mountain Climate Organization and the Natural Resources Defense Council shows that the frequency of severe storms across the Midwest has doubled over the past 50 years.

The report analyzed precipitation data from more than 200 weather stations in eight Midwestern states.

river
paukrus / flickr

 A report released today by the Army Corps of Engineers says that having more free space in reservoirs along the Missouri River would not have eliminated last year’s record floods.

farmland
File / KBIA

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is seeking dismissal of a lawsuit brought on behalf of more than 140 southeast Missouri farmers over damage caused by last year's intentional breach of the Birds Point levee at the height of spring flooding.

Newscast for April 2, 2012

Apr 2, 2012
File / KBIA

Regional news coverage from the KBIA News room, including:

  • A potential tax break for business and business owners in Missouri.
  • A look at how this year's early warm weather affects insects.
  • The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers hopes to avoid a lawsuit from southeast Missouri farmers.
Kansas City District / flickr

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is seeking the dismissal of a lawsuit by more than 140 southeast Missouri farmers over damage caused by last year's intentional breach of a levee at the height of spring flooding.

Newscast for March 16, 2012

Mar 16, 2012
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Regional news coverage from the KBIA News room, including:

  • Repeat of last year's flooding unlikely
  • Military Academy names new president
  • City of Columbia implements new parking meters

Repeat of last year's flooding unlikely

Mar 16, 2012
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Missouri experienced record flooding last year along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. But this year, experts say water levels are likely to return to normal.                

flickr / USACE Public Affairs

Six levee, drainage and road districts in northwest Missouri will receive a total of about $1.2 million in community development block grants to help repair damage from flooding along the Missouri River. Gov. Jay Nixon's office said in a release that the six districts are located in Atchison and Holt counties.

Levee districts applied for the grants to cover either the 20 percent local cost share required under the Army Corps of Engineers' maintenance program, or for the entire cost if the levee district is not part of the Corps' system.

File / KBIA

Governor Jay Nixon met with Missouri Levee and Drainage District members in Columbia this weekend. He and other state and federal officials responded to over eight months of questions from farmers and others on how Missouri’s waterways will be protected from future massive flooding. This is the first time a Missouri governor attended an annual levee district association meeting in over 15 years, and with good reason, as Governor Nixon addressed the standing room only crowd, he branded 2011: “the year of natural disasters.”

Newscast for February 13, 2012

Feb 13, 2012
File / KBIA

Regional news coverage from the KBIA News room, including:

  • School closures in Columbia on a snowy morning.
  • Governor Nixon heads to Columbia to discuss flood protection.
  • The Missouri Supreme Court plans to look again at congressional districts.

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