frac sand

Carole Mitchell / Flickr

In Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., about 100 residents gathered for a town hall meeting in 2013 to discuss a new frac sand mine in their backyard. Officials from the county, state and mining company attended to answer questions residents might have.

Neighbors peppered the panel with questions: How will the mine’s sand dust be regulated? How will you prevent it from getting into our lungs? How will the traffic and explosions affect my health, my property and the ecosystem? Concerns about breathing in the microscopic sand particles, which could lead to silicosis in the lungs, abounded.

Jane Hardy, who lives about 1000 feet from the mine, said she wasn’t satisfied with the answers.

Peter Gray / Harvest Public Media

For nearly a year now, hog farmers have been battling a virus. It’s deadly to newly born piglets and farmers are scrambling to protect their herds. With fewer pigs comes less pork. Harvest Public Media’s Amy Mayer reports.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Missouri’s Department of Natural Resources approved the permit for a 73-acre frac sand mine in Ste. Genevieve County Thursday.  The department also denied a request for an official hearing on the proposed mine owned by Summit Proppants.

Several people who live near the proposed mine have been fighting the approval of the permit for most of the year. They’ve cited health, environmental and quality of life concerns. Ste. Genevieve county resident Mike Miller says they are disappointed but will continue to fight the mine in the legal system.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources has postponed its decision on issuing a permit for a proposed frac sand mine in Ste. Genevieve County.

The department’s Land Reclamation Commission voted Thursday to table its decision for two weeks so it can determine if the mine’s location would violate a federal non-discrimination act.

Dozens of Ste. Genevieve County residents met last night (Tuesday) with the company applying to open up a sand mine in their neighborhood. Locals fired questions at Mark Rust, owner of Summit Proppants, for four hours about health concerns, traffic safety and property values.

Missouri voters will get the chance to consider a constitutional amendment next fall that would affirm the rights of farmers to engage in modern farming and ranching practices. The state House and Senate passed the measure during the end of the legislative session last week. Harvest Public Media reports.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Dozens of Ste. Genevieve County residents met Tuesday night with the company applying to open up a sand mine in their neighborhood. Locals fired questions at Mark Rust, owner of Summit Proppants, for four hours about the mine’s potential impact on the community.

The biggest points of contention between locals and the company included regulation on air and water quality, the 50 semis traveling in and out of the facility daily, the possible decrease in property value and a guarantee that the company would only operate during the day.