fraud

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 A former St. Joseph school district superintendent who was overpaid more than $660,000 in pension payments has pleaded guilty to one count of wire fraud.

The U.S. attorney's office says 70-year-old Dan Colgan, of St. Joseph, faces one year and one day in prison under the plea he entered Monday in federal court in Kansas City.

Through the plea, Colgan admitted that his salary was improperly inflated to increase his retirement benefits.

He must pay $662,660 in restitution before his sentencing hearing. Colgan is free on bond, and the hearing hasn't been scheduled.

selbstfotografiert / Wikimedia Common

A central Missouri woman has admitted to stealing nearly $400,000 from her employer.

Federal prosecutors say Abbie Martin Stemper, of Versailles, pleaded guilty Tuesday to wire fraud and bank fraud.

Stemper was a bookkeeper and purchasing agent at Smith Paper & Janitor Supply in Eldon from 2009 to February 2015.

Prosecutors say Stemper stole the money in various ways, including selling the company's products through her own businesses but not reimbursing Smith Paper & Janitor Supply.

A former IRS employee has been sentenced in federal court in Missouri two years and six months in prison in a $326,000 fraudulent tax refund scheme.

The U.S. attorney's office says that 39-year-old Demetria Michele Brown, of Birmingham, Alabama, also was ordered Monday to pay restitution to the state of Missouri and the IRS.

Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

The Missouri attorney general's office said a home security company accused of misleading consumers has to pay $50,000 to Missouri customers. 

Jay Nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Financial advisers soon will have more authority to act if they suspect an older Missouri resident or person with a disability is the target of financial fraud.

Gov. Jay Nixon on Friday signed a bill touted by supporters as a way to protect seniors from exploitation.

Once the bill takes effect, financial professionals can refuse to process transactions if fraud is suspected.

The measure applies to advisers of those over 60 or those with disabilities.

mamtek
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Attorneys say an investment firm has settled a federal lawsuit accusing it of bilking investors out of $39 million in a failed effort to build an artificial sweetener plant in Moberly. 

A new audit released Tuesday finds that some welfare recipients in Missouri have used their benefits to buy things besides food and other daily necessities, while others may have moved away but continue to get in-state benefits.

daysofthundr46 / Flickr

The parent company of the supermarket chain Schnucks wants a federal court to dismiss two lawsuits related to a security breach of customer credit and debit cards.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the two lawsuits seek class-action status. Schnucks said in dismissal motions that the plaintiffs didn't have standing to sue and couldn't prove they suffered any harm.

One suit was filed in U.S. District Court in Chicago, while the other in was filed U.S. District Court in St. Louis.

MU Police warn of fake football tickets

Sep 13, 2012
Photo provided by Matt Noonan

Some Mizzou football fans got less than they bargained for at last Saturday’s game. MU Police received several reports of fraudulent tickets after the game against the University of Georgia. Those with fake tickets were turned away at the gate. MU Police Captain Brian Weimer says it’s only when you look at a real ticket next to a fake one that you may be able to tell the difference.