gay marriage

Updated at 4:50 p.m. with comments from plaintiff Kyle Lawson.

Two days after a state judge in St. Louis came to the same conclusion, a federal judge in Kansas City has struck down Missouri's ban on same-sex marriage.  

PM Newscast November 05, 2014

Nov 5, 2014

Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • MU Provost search hosts another candidate
  • Missouri ban on gay marriage ruled unconstitutional
  • Voter turnout down in Missouri
  • St. Louis Art Museum receives massive gift
  • Columbia City Council approves gas station

(Will be updated.)

A judge in St. Louis has ruled that Missouri's ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional. Already several same-sex couples have made their way to City Hall to get their marriage licenses.

epSos .de / Flickr

  Missouri's health care and retirement plans are expanding coverage to same-sex spouses following a recent court ruling.

gavel
Flickr / steakpinball

  Missouri's assistant attorney general has argued that state law, backed by the vote of the people, makes it clear that marriage is defined as between a man and a woman.

Jeremiah Morgan defended Missouri's same-sex marriage ban Monday in a St. Louis courtroom. St. Louis Circuit Judge Rex Burlison is deciding whether the ban is constitutional.

St. Louis City Counselor Winston Calvert argued the state has no business treating gay and lesbian couples as "second-class citizens."

William Murphy via Flickr

A legal challenge to Missouri's gay marriage ban returns to court in St. Louis.

The city issued marriage licenses to four same-sex couples in June, setting up a court fight in a state where gay marriage is banned under a 2004 amendment to the Missouri Constitution. St. Louis officials have agreed to stop issuing marriage licenses to gay couples pending resolution of the legal case and others in state and federal courts.

Online court records list Monday's proceeding before St. Louis Circuit Judge Rex Burlison as a status hearing.

steakpinball / Flickr

A lawsuit challenging Missouri's ban on gay marriage has been moved to federal court instead of state court. The lawsuit was originally filed in Jackson County by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of two same-sex couples who were denied marriage licenses.

A parish food pantry worker who was fired over her marriage to another woman is suing the Roman Catholic Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph.

Tod Martin wasn’t going to let 20 words keep him from marrying David Gray.

While it took more than 20 years, St. Louis officials last week issued Martin and Gray a marriage license. They’re among eight people who are testing the state’s nearly 10-year-old, 20-word ban on gay marriage.

Dan Verbeck / KBIA

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster says he personally supports gay marriage but will defend the state's constitutional ban against it.

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

A Missouri House Democrat has introduced legislation that would repeal the state's ban on gay marriage.

Mike Colona, a House member from St. Louis who is gay, filed a proposed constitutional amendment this week that would go before voters in November. Colona was joined by 30 of his Democratic colleagues as co-sponsors.

Jay Nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Gov. Jay Nixon says Missouri voters should have another chance to vote on gay marriage and that he would vote to allow such unions.

rainbow flag
Ludovic Bertron / Wikimedia Commons

 

  The American Civil Liberties Union on Wednesday plans to file suit challenging Missouri's treatment of same-sex marriages.

ACLU's Diane Balogh said Tuesday that the suit will be filed in state court in Kansas City, but she would not discuss specifics. News conferences announcing the litigation are planned for Wednesday morning in Kansas City, St. Louis, Jefferson City and Springfield.

It's unclear if the ACLU suit will challenge Missouri's constitutional ban on same-sex marriages or if it would simply seek recognition of gay marriages from other states.

What DOMA means for Missouri

Jun 26, 2013

The Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA Wedensday. It’s  a provision of a federal law that denies federal benefits to married gay couples.

For the states that have legalized gay marriage (12 of them, and the District of Columbia), it’s clear what the impact of this decision will be for same-sex couples in those states.  Their spouses will now be entitled to the same federal benefits as straight couples, which was not the case in the past. But the result is murkier in the other 38 states where gay marriage is not legally protected (like in Missouri).

The Supreme Court's 5-4 decision Wednesday to overturn the Defense of Marriage Act is a monumental victory for advocates of same-sex marriage.

But what happens now that the 1996 federal law that confines marriage to a man and a woman has been declared unconstitutional?

Will federal benefits flow only to same-sex married couples living in states that recognize their unions?

Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones (R, Eureka)  says the decision over gay marriage should be left to the states, and not to the federal government.

Claire McCaskill
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill says she believes gay couples should be able to marry.