global journalist

Covering Syria

Apr 23, 2015
Ibrahim Khader

  The four-year long civil war in Syria has claimed hundreds of thousands of lives and forced millions to flee. But coverage of the conflict has waned, as other news stories have taken center stage. Global Journalist looks at how journalists are covering the war, and how it's affecting people on the ground.

This week's guests:

Jerome Delay / AP

Ethiopia's parliamentary elections are set to be held May 24th, but there is little doubt the ruling party will win an overwhelming majority amidst a crackdown on independent media and political dissidents. This week on Global Journalist, we look at why and how the restrictions on the media in Africa's second-most populous country began, and speak with a journalist who spent more than a year in prison for reporting.

Jon Chol Jin / AP

North Korea has long been a forbidden land for journalists, human rights advocates, and pretty much anyone who publicly disagrees with the regime’s philosophies and practices. But there have been more and more cracks in the facade, and people are beginning to share their stories with the rest of the world.

Ciro Fusco / EPA

Two years after Pope Francis was selected to lead the Roman Catholic church, Global Journalist's Jason McLure sits down with three Catholic news agency journalists who to examine his popularity and how he interacts with the media.  

This week's guests:

Deported for a Tweet

Mar 27, 2015
AP/Today's Zaman

This week on Global Journalist, guest host Joshua Kranzberg takes you around the world for a series of stories on the challenges of journalism in a rapidly changing world.

*Mahir Zeynalov, an Azerbaijani columnist for Turkey's Today's Zaman newspaper, speaks with Global Journalist's Jason McLure about being deported from Turkey for his Twitter use.

Yemen on the Brink

Mar 19, 2015
Hani Mohammed / Associated Press

The small Arabian peninsula nation of Yemen has gone through a lot of turmoil in the past decade. One president was ousted in 2012 during the Arab Spring, in January a second was overthrown by the Houthis, an Iranian-backed militia. Meanwhile al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, perhaps the terror group's most deadly affiliate, has seized the opportunity to expand its presence in Yemen.

What is the future of this country, and what does it mean for the West if it becomes an Iranian ally or descends into Somalia-style chaos?

European Pressphoto Agency

After the recent attacks in Copenhagen and France involving terrorists targeting Jewish people, Global Journalist looks at whether this is indicative of a broad rise in anti-Semitism in the region.

We examine recent incidents in France, the Netherlands and Denmark and discuss the threat from Islamic extremists and far-right and far-left political groups.

AP

Our focus this week is on China and the restrictions it places on the media inside the country, and how it affects not only journalists but Internet users. From the Great Firewall to denying visas to critical foreign journalists, what is the future of freedom of expression in the world’s most populous country?

Dolores Ochoa / AP

Many people know Ecuador as the home of calm and picturesque sights, from the Galapagos Islands and lush Amazonian rain forest to soaring Andean peaks.

eugene-richards
Global Journalist

We talk to acclaimed photographer Eugene Richards about his work, and receiving a 2014 Missouri Honor Medal.

http://youtu.be/vAwV09XgFzo

Global Journalist

We talk to Audie Cornish, recipient of a 2014 Missouri Honor Medal, about her work at NPR and the future of radio.

Kin Cheung / AP Photo

The Guardian is a well known and highly respected newspaper that received a 2014 Missouri Honor Medal for services to journalism. We interviewed James Ball, special projects editor at The Guardian, about his newspaper's work and mission. We also spoke to Ball about his connection to Julian Assange and Edward Snowden; he's worked for Wikileaks and with the Guardian team that published the groundbreaking stories about the National Security Agency's mass surveillance program based on leaked documents from Edward Snowden.

Honoring the Kyiv Post

Jan 8, 2015
Kyiv Post

This episode of Global Journalist is audio only.

We interviewed Brian Bonner and Katya Gorchinskaya of the Kyiv Post, which received a 2014 Missouri Honor Medal, about their careers and the future of journalism. The Kyiv Post is an English language, independent newspaper that became a prime source of information for the west when Russian actions in Ukraine escalated.

calame
Global Journalist

  We speak to Byron "Barney" Calame, a recipient of the 2014 Missouri Honor Medal, about his career at The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. Joining us is Paul Steiger, the founder of ProPublica, and the former managing editor of The Wall Street Journal.

khadija
Aziz Karimov / AP Photo

This episode of Global Journalist is audio only.

With the recent arrest of Azeri investigative reporter Khadija Ismayilova, we look at Azerbaijan's crackdowns on journalists, and whether there's hope for the future. Our guests:

What happened to #BringBackOurGirls?

Dec 11, 2014
bringbackourgirls
Ben Curtis / AP Photo

This episode of Global Journalist is audio only.

Remember the social media campaign #BringBackOurGirls? It was meant to draw attention to the kidnapping of 276 Nigerian girls, who were taken from their school in April by Boko Haram, an Islamic militant group based in northern Nigeria. A few of the girls were either able to escape, or were released. But, the international attention once given to the story has largely dissipated, and 219 of the schoolgirls are still missing. This week on Global Journalist, we look at Boko Haram, the #BringBackOurGirls campaign, and what steps are being taken to combat Islamic extremism in Nigeria. 

After Iguala, what's next for Mexico?

Dec 4, 2014
mexico-protest
Eduardo Verdugo / AP Photo

Earlier this year, you may have heard of an incident in a small city in Mexico, where a group of 43 teaching students disappeared. The men who vanished in September were studying at a rural college called Ayotzinapa Normal School. On September 26, more than 100 students from the school had been protesting teacher hiring practices and funding for teachers’ colleges in the nearby city of Iguala. This week on Global Journalist, we look at the investigation, and what effect the disappearances have had in Mexico. Our guests:

unclos-protestors-ap
Aaron Favila / AP Photo

We’re all familiar with border disputes on land … but what about those on the water? Maritime disputes in the Arctic and in the South China Sea are increasing, as countries vie for valuable natural resources beneath the ocean’s waves. Current international law sets strict guidelines on what economic rights countries have off their coasts. But, is the system in place the best one? Is the International Law of the Sea still sufficient today?

Indigenous land rights in Australia

Nov 20, 2014
australia-aboriginal
Mark Baker / AP Photo

Throughout the world, indigenous people are fighting for the right to reclaim land they lost due to European territorial expansion, colonialism, or to other means. One place where this debate has been ongoing is Australia. There, Aboriginal peoples and other indigenous people have fought for years to advance their native land claims — with resistance from the government and mining and energy companies. This week on Global Journalist, we’ll talk about some other land disputes between Aboriginal peoples and Australia’s federal & provincial governments. Our guests:

Indonesia's new man in charge

Nov 13, 2014
jokowi
Tatan Syuflana / AP Photo

On 20 October, Joko Widodo took office as Indonesia's new president. Jokowi, as he is popularly known, is the first Indonesian president without a military background or from an elite political family. What challenges does he face as president?

Our guests:

Ebola epidemic continues

Nov 6, 2014
Michael Duff / AP

Since our last program on Ebola, the death toll from the disease has more than doubled to 4,800. U.S. and Spanish aid workers sickened by Ebola also transmitted it to medical workers in the U.S. and in Spain - causing widespread media coverage - and leading people to talk of an epidemic of “Fear-Bola.” But there is good news. The West African nation of Liberia has been hardest hit by the disease, with an estimated 6,500 cases. But last week the country reported just 89 new probable cases.

Book talk: "Arab Women Rising" (rebroadcast)

Oct 30, 2014
arab-women
Ahmed AlFardan / NurPhoto/Sipa USA (Sipa via AP Images)

This episode originally aired in August 2014.  

Censorship in Turkey

Oct 23, 2014
turkey protest
Emrah Gurel / AP Photo

  After 11 years as prime minister, Recip Tayyip Erdogan became Turkey's first directly-elected president in August. Under Erdogan’s tenure, Turkey’s economy has grown significantly. The country’s main minority group, the Kurds, have gained new rights. And a military with a history of meddling in politics has been kept in its barracks. But press freedom groups like Reporters Without Borders and the Committee to Protect Journalists have consistently criticized efforts by Erdogan’s AK Party to limit freedom of expression and of the press.

International sex trafficking

Oct 16, 2014
trafficking
Anindito Mukherjee / EPA

Given the nature of this discussion, listener discretion is advised.

On this week's show, we are looking at sex trafficking of children around the world, and how the media covers this problem. In September 2012, the Times of London first reported that police in the English city of Rotherham had covered up a series of sexual abuses against children that took place from 1997 onward. The British government then commissioned a report to investigate the claims, and to examine the police's handling of the allegations. The report was published in August. It found that at least 1,400 children had been victimized in Rotherham, and that both the police and the local government knew about the abuse, but did nothing to act on it. While this story attracted international attention for its scope and scale, it is sadly just one of many instances of child sex trafficking and victimization that takes place throughout the world. Journalists often struggle to cover these types of stories, not only due to sensitivities surrounding child sexual abuse, but because finding accurate information about the cases can be hard to find. 

The psychology of foreign jihadis

Oct 9, 2014
foreign-jihad
Sherin Zada / AP Photo

This week on Global Journalist, we look, once again, at the Islamic State and the ongoing fighting in the Middle East. Recent videos from the militant group have featured people not from the West fighting for ISIS' cause. To that point, videos depicting the beheading of American journalists and a British aid worker have highlighted a British person who describes what ISIS is fighting for before he executes the group's captives. But what makes someone who was born in the west and was educated in the west decide to fight for a group that wants to destroy the west?

What's happening in Hong Kong?

Oct 2, 2014
hong kong protests
Wong Maye-E / AP Photo

On this week's show, we are looking at the protests in Hong Kong that have attracted worldwide attention. Students and citizens alike have been protesting China's decision to manage the region's 2017 general election. Back in the 1980s, the United Kingdom and China negotiated a treaty that ceded Hong Kong back to China. According to that treaty, the people who run Hong Kong's government are, eventually, to be selected through universal suffrage. In 2007, it was decided that the 2017 election would be the first to meet that criteria. Protesters say that what China has proposed, though, falls far short of universal suffrage. China wants to pre-select candidates for Hong Kong's government based on guidelines it sets, instead of allowing any candidate run for any position. This week on Global Journalist, we look at the protests and the situation in Hong Kong, and what it could mean for the region's future. 

islamic-state-still
Courtesy of VICE

On this week's program, we are looking at VICE. No – not the bad habits we all have – but the media organization that is challenging common perceptions of what is and isn't journalism. Our guests:

Ebola in West Africa

Sep 18, 2014
ebola treatment
Kjell Gunnar Beraas, MSF / AP Photo

There has been a lot of media coverage lately dedicated to the spread of the Ebola virus in Africa, which is estimated to have killed at least 2,300 people. The outbreak began in December 2013, when the first cases of Ebola virus were reported in Guinea, located in western Africa. Since then, the disease has spread to neighboring Senegal and Sierra Leone, and from there to Liberia. Both the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the World Health Organization, warn that unless immediate action is taken quickly, the outbreak could become unmanageable.

alfred friendly partners
Alfred Friendly Press Partners

In 1983, journalist Alfred Friendly launched an exchange program with journalists all over the world. The Alfred Friendly Press Partners fellowship brings a group of foreign journalists to the United States for work experience and journalistic training they might not get in their home countries. The experience also allows these journalists to find links between the communities they work in here in the U.S., and those they come from.

alfred friendly partners
Alfred Friendly Press Partners

In 1983, journalist Alfred Friendly launched an exchange program with journalists all over the world. The Alfred Friendly Press Partners fellowship brings a group of foreign journalists to the United States for work experience and journalistic training they might not get in their home countries. The experience also allows these journalists to find links between the communities they work in here in the U.S., and those they come from.

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