gov. nixon

Jay Nixon at State of the State Address 2010
File Photo / KBIA

Service and technology companies based in Missouri will have the option of calculating their taxes in a way that supporters of the measure say avoids double taxation.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has approved spending over $250 million more this fiscal year.

Nixon on Monday signed legislation that includes $120 million in additional general revenue spending. Nixon had requested the extra money, in part because lawmakers last year budgeted for an anticipated $50 million from a tobacco settlement that has not yet come.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Governor Jay Nixon has issued his first veto of the season on a measure he says would unfairly penalize experienced school administrators.

The bill Nixon vetoed Friday would have barred former school superintendents from serving on school boards in the same district where they worked.

Boone Courthouse
KBIA

Missouri governor Jay Nixon says municipal courts need to be reformed to restore trust between citizens and the government eroded by abuses like those detailed in a Department of Justice report on Ferguson.

File photo

Governor Jay Nixon's budget request for more money both this year and next faces big hurdles from lawmakers.

Republican lawmakers this week raised concerns about approving new spending for this year at the same time the governor is withholding money from some priorities.

taylor.a / FLICKR

Governor Nixon announced Monday that the nonprofit group USA Funds will give Missouri $2 million in grants to improve its higher education system. This money will go towards improving the state’s higher education affordability and innovation.

  Through a $1 million grant, USA Funds will help to expand the Missouri Innovation Campus initiative. This program establishes partnerships between high schools, community colleges, four-year colleges, universities and area businesses.

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich says an audit released Monday shows that Gov. Jay Nixon violated Missouri's constitution when he withheld money from two recent state budgets.

Schweich says the governor had no legal right to withhold $172 million from several state programs to help cover costs from the Joplin tornado and other recent natural disasters during fiscal year 2012.

KBIA File Photo

 

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says he does not support the gas chamber method to execute prisoners according to KMOX. The issue of lethal injection in death penalty cases has been tied up in courts. Last week, Attorney General Chris Koster suggested Missouri use gas chambers for prisoner executions. He says state statutes allow for either method of execution. 

When Governor Nixon was asked about Koster's suggestion at a press conference Tuesday, he said Missouri does not have a gas chamber and issues related to the death penalty need to be worked out in the courts. 

File / KBIA

Missouri lawmakers have until Friday to finalize the state's roughly $25 billion operating budget.

A crowd estimated at more than 1,000 crammed into the Rotunda of the Missouri Capitol Tuesday to hear Governor Jay Nixon (D) call for expanding Medicaid to an additional 300,000 residents, nearly 260,000 of them by next year.


He told the crowd that the people he wants to add are those with low-paying jobs that don’t include health coverage.

Missouri Senator Kurt Schaefer (R, Columbia) says the Department of Revenue (DOR) has continued to withhold information from his legislative committee about the list of conceal carry weapons (CCW) holders that the agency compiled for the federal government.

As the controversy over scanned documents and other personal information continues in Jefferson City, television viewers might get the impression a statewide election is imminent, though it is not.

The ads begin with an on-screen question: “Is Jay Nixon's administration breaking the law?”

The commercials proceed, like some campaign ads, but the campaign for governor was last November.

Leader Nancy Pelosi / Flickr

Every Friday, KBIA's Health & Wealth Desk talks about the week's most interesting articles and reports on rural health, wealth and society issues. 

'Redneck reality' and rural portrayal in cable television

Entertainment newspaper The A.V. Club muses on A&E's popular reality show Duck Dynasty, saying the show is the 21st century incarnation of old rural-themed sitcoms that once dominated network television. Think Petticoat JunctionThe Beverly Hillbillies, and Hee-Haw. It's an interesting read, but we were especially interested with the author's take on ways the television shows have to negotiate the rural-urban political disparities. 

While the rural-themed programming of days gone by tended to depict the small Southern town as a bucolic haven for good-hearted folk, redneck reality is more apt to acknowledge the social and economic ills of the subcultures it depicts. These shows are sanitized for the protection of viewers with blue-state sensibilities; when they occur at all, political discussions tend to center on generalized platitudes about freedom and family, rather than specifics that might turn off half the potential audience.

 

H/T: The Rural Blog

Did headlines about death rates at rural hospitals tell the wrong story?
The Daily Yonder is killing it with their opinion pieces this week. 

Case in point: A new report made headlines last week, saying death rates are rising at rural, geographically isolated hospitals. But an opinion writer for the Yonder says news reports are not telling the real story of these so-called critical access hospitals:

The patients in the small rural hospital with heart attack, heart failure or pneumonia have become a select population. A large proportion has decided that they are through paying all the human costs of the miracles of modern medicine. They have made the decision to stay in familiar surroundings near home and family. 

The researchers found that 13.3% of the patients at critical access hospitals with one of the three conditions died, compared to 11.4 % of the medical center patients. Given all the terrible tools that modern medical centers have to work with, I’m amazed they only manage a small difference in patient survival over the most basic, little country hospitals in America. 

File / KBIA

Gov. Jay Nixon is increasing his opposition to Senate legislation that would cut Missouri's income tax and raise the state sales tax.

Newscast for June 1, 2012

Jun 1, 2012

Regional news coverage from the KBIA News room, including: