governor jay nixon

Jay Nixon
File Photo / KBIA

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is urging lawmakers to sustain his line-item vetoes of $144 million of spending items in the state's budget.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has nominated former St. Louis Police Chief Dan Isom to be the state’s new public-safety director, a move that will put Isom in charge of a number of diverse state agencies – from the Highway Patrol to the Gaming Commission.

Isom served 24 years on the St. Louis police force, and retired as chief 18 months ago. He holds doctoral degrees in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Missouri-St. Louis, where he has served as a professor for the past year.

(Updated at 4:20 p.m., Thurs., Aug. 14)

As of Thursday, the Missouri Highway Patrol is now in charge in Ferguson. And Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, who announced the change, said at a news conference that the public should see a difference at once.

The St. Louis County police have been widely criticized for their aggressive, even militaristic stance -- using armored vehicles and tear gas -- to quell protests stemming from last Saturday's police shooting. 

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is calling for an investigation into the way leaders at UMKC’s Henry W. Bloch School of Management promoted the school.  

kids jumping
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

The jumping jack is about to become Missouri's official state exercise.

Gov. Nixon signed legislation Thursday adding the jumping jack to a list of more than two dozen official symbols and things.

By Gregory F. Maxwell / Wikimedia commons

Legislation rewriting Missouri's payday loan laws has been vetoed by Gov. Jay Nixon because he says it falls short of "true reform."

Borrowers in Missouri currently can renew a payday loan up to six times and can face interest rates as high as 75 percent of the loan's original amount.

Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation expanding prenatal health coverage and allowing some newly trained doctors to go to work more quickly.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has vetoed legislation that would have limited who may work as a health insurance guide for a new federally run website.

columns at university of missouri
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The University of Missouri is making cuts across the board to make up for money it expected it to receive from the state government, but will not. In an email to university staff Thursday, Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin said MU must make up for an additional $3.8 million that is not coming to the University due to Governor Jay Nixon's recent general revenue withholdings.

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Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation that enacts performance-based funding for Missouri's public universities and community colleges.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon came to St. Louis County Wednesday to launch a broad study of the state's future energy needs.

The Democratic governor's remarks to a meeting of Midcontinent Independent Service Operator stakeholders at The Ritz-Carlton hotel in Clayton followed an April announcement of a new state Energy Division in the Missouri Department of Economic Development. The new government agency will hold a series of public meetings across the state as it prepares a report on a recommended strategy by the end of May 2015.

David Sachs / SEIU

  

  By now Missourians are familiar with the debate over expanding Medicaid in the state.

The Affordable Care Act gives most people the opportunity to purchase health insurance with help from federal tax credits. But individuals earning too little to qualify for these tax credits but too much to be covered under for Missouri Medicaid are stuck in what is called “The Gap.”

nixon
File photo / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has spoken out about legislation recently passed by the Missouri General Assembly.

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Missouri lawmakers would create a permanent joint committee on the state's criminal justice system under bills awaiting action by Gov. Jay Nixon.

The panel would review criminal laws, law enforcement, prison issues and state efforts related to terrorism and homeland security. The committee would include members of the House and Senate, with the state's chief justice, the state auditor and the attorney general as ex officio members.

(Updated Thursday, May 29)

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon says that local governments stand to lose almost as much money as the state because of a final tax-cutting spree by the General Assembly before it adjourned earlier this month.

All told, Nixon said Wednesday, local jurisdictions around Missouri — from city halls to fire districts, libraries and ambulance services — could lose $351 million in annual sales tax revenue because of “a grab bag of giveaways’’ approved by legislators.

SkiStar / Flickr

Legislation pending before Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon would require new oversight of some unlicensed child care centers.

When it comes to a proposal to raise the state’s sales tax to pay for transportation projects, two of Missouri’s top Democratic officials appear to be on opposing sides of the fence.

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill favors the proposal, which – if approved by voters in August – would enact a 10-year, 0.75 percent sales tax for transportation projects. And even though he’s sent signals that he opposes the proposal, Gov. Jay Nixon is withholding statements about the tax increase for now.

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Missouri lawmakers approved special tax breaks this year that could benefit pizza parlors and power companies, clothes cleaners and computer data centers. And that's just the start of it.

After telegraphing his intention for a week, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon on Friday announced that he is indeed going to veto the student-transfer bill because of its provisions allowing public money to be used for private schools.

He also faults the bill because it does not require unaccredited sending districts to pay any transportation costs for students transferring to accredited districts, as the schools now are required to do.

david shane / flickr

  The proposed student transfer fix is now on its way to Governor Jay Nixon.  In addition to allowing individual school buildings to be accredited instead of districts as a whole, the bill would also allow some students to transfer from unaccredited public schools to private, nonsectarian schools.  Republican Rick Stream of St. Louis County handled the bill in the House. 

missouri capitol
File photo / KBIA

  Missouri legislative budget leaders have embraced a financing plan for a new facility on the Fulton State Hospital campus.

The proposal calls for issuing bonds through the Missouri Development Finance Board and paying them off over 25 years. The upcoming year's budget would include $14.2 million for payment on bonds. House and Senate negotiators are working today on a final version of next year's state budget.

The financing proposal approved today by the lawmakers follows Governor Jay Nixon's plan for the project.

jay nixon
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  In Springfield Tuesday, Governor Jay Nixon continued to rally support for his expected veto of an income tax cut bill. He questioned the credibility of outside interests that are campaigning for a veto override. The Democratic Governor’s statements came a day after Americans for Tax Reform President Grover Norquist joined Republican House Speaker Tim Jones to challenge Nixon’s arguments on SB 509, which was passed two weeks ago.

File Photo / KBIA

  Missouri lawmakers have given final approval to legislation that could make it harder for people to collect unemployment benefits after being fired for repeated absences or other alleged misconduct.

The House passed the bill Tuesday by a 107-45 vote. Because it already had cleared the Senate, the measure now goes to Gov. Jay Nixon.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is raising new concerns that an income tax cut passed by the Legislature could have "cataclysmic" consequences for state revenues.

The Democratic governor said Tuesday that the bill could eliminate taxes on all income over $9,000, punching a $4.8 billion hole in the state budget.

Republican legislative leaders called Nixon's assertion "ridiculous," ''absurd" and "laughable."

Nixon did not veto the bill Tuesday but has indicated he will do so.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

  Gov. Jay Nixon announced the launch of a statewide comprehensive energy plan at the Advancing Renewables conference at the University of Missouri on Tuesday, April 8.

The Missouri Department of Economic Development’s Division of Energy will lead the initiative to develop the energy plan.

The governor said public meetings will be held across the state to seek input from energy stakeholders, including renewable energy companies, researchers and environmental advocates.

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

  The Missouri Senate has finally passed a tax cut bill, after different versions were blocked by Republicans who opposed a compromise between the fellow GOP sponsor and Democratic Governor Jay Nixon.  The bill now on its way to the Missouri House would cut the individual income tax rate from 6 percent to 5-and-a-half percent and phase in a 25 percent deduction on business income.  The changes would not take effect until 2017.  The measure is sponsored by Republican Senator Will Kraus of Lee’s Summit. 

gavel
Flickr / steakpinball

A state judge has been asked to put an immediate halt to Missouri's acceptance of joint tax returns from gay couples who got married legally in other states.

Missouri Capitol
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri governors would be barred from making budget cuts to schools under a proposed constitutional amendment passed by the Senate.

File Photo / KBIA

  Missouri voters would be required to show photo identification before casting ballots under legislation endorsed by the Missouri House today.

The House gave first-round approval to two measures that would enact the requirement. One is a state constitutional amendment that would require a photo ID during elections. The other bill would actually implement this requirement.

Gov. Nixon's call to expand Medicaid rejected

Feb 24, 2014
Missouri Capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

A Missouri House panel has once again rejected Gov. Jay Nixon's call to expand Medicaid for about 300,000 people.

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