governor jay nixon

david shane / flickr

  The proposed student transfer fix is now on its way to Governor Jay Nixon.  In addition to allowing individual school buildings to be accredited instead of districts as a whole, the bill would also allow some students to transfer from unaccredited public schools to private, nonsectarian schools.  Republican Rick Stream of St. Louis County handled the bill in the House. 

missouri capitol
File photo / KBIA

  Missouri legislative budget leaders have embraced a financing plan for a new facility on the Fulton State Hospital campus.

The proposal calls for issuing bonds through the Missouri Development Finance Board and paying them off over 25 years. The upcoming year's budget would include $14.2 million for payment on bonds. House and Senate negotiators are working today on a final version of next year's state budget.

The financing proposal approved today by the lawmakers follows Governor Jay Nixon's plan for the project.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

  In Springfield Tuesday, Governor Jay Nixon continued to rally support for his expected veto of an income tax cut bill. He questioned the credibility of outside interests that are campaigning for a veto override. The Democratic Governor’s statements came a day after Americans for Tax Reform President Grover Norquist joined Republican House Speaker Tim Jones to challenge Nixon’s arguments on SB 509, which was passed two weeks ago.

File Photo / KBIA

  Missouri lawmakers have given final approval to legislation that could make it harder for people to collect unemployment benefits after being fired for repeated absences or other alleged misconduct.

The House passed the bill Tuesday by a 107-45 vote. Because it already had cleared the Senate, the measure now goes to Gov. Jay Nixon.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is raising new concerns that an income tax cut passed by the Legislature could have "cataclysmic" consequences for state revenues.

The Democratic governor said Tuesday that the bill could eliminate taxes on all income over $9,000, punching a $4.8 billion hole in the state budget.

Republican legislative leaders called Nixon's assertion "ridiculous," ''absurd" and "laughable."

Nixon did not veto the bill Tuesday but has indicated he will do so.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

  Gov. Jay Nixon announced the launch of a statewide comprehensive energy plan at the Advancing Renewables conference at the University of Missouri on Tuesday, April 8.

The Missouri Department of Economic Development’s Division of Energy will lead the initiative to develop the energy plan.

The governor said public meetings will be held across the state to seek input from energy stakeholders, including renewable energy companies, researchers and environmental advocates.

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

  The Missouri Senate has finally passed a tax cut bill, after different versions were blocked by Republicans who opposed a compromise between the fellow GOP sponsor and Democratic Governor Jay Nixon.  The bill now on its way to the Missouri House would cut the individual income tax rate from 6 percent to 5-and-a-half percent and phase in a 25 percent deduction on business income.  The changes would not take effect until 2017.  The measure is sponsored by Republican Senator Will Kraus of Lee’s Summit. 

gavel
Flickr / steakpinball

A state judge has been asked to put an immediate halt to Missouri's acceptance of joint tax returns from gay couples who got married legally in other states.

Missouri Capitol
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri governors would be barred from making budget cuts to schools under a proposed constitutional amendment passed by the Senate.

File Photo / KBIA

  Missouri voters would be required to show photo identification before casting ballots under legislation endorsed by the Missouri House today.

The House gave first-round approval to two measures that would enact the requirement. One is a state constitutional amendment that would require a photo ID during elections. The other bill would actually implement this requirement.

Gov. Nixon's call to expand Medicaid rejected

Feb 24, 2014
Missouri Capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

A Missouri House panel has once again rejected Gov. Jay Nixon's call to expand Medicaid for about 300,000 people.

Courtesy of Mike Menu

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says "our thoughts and prayers" go to the family of a former University of Missouri swimmer who said she was sexually assaulted and later committed suicide.

KBIA

  A Missouri House committee is considering legislation to offer additional financial aid to persuade more top students to stay in the state after they graduate.

The legislation would add a forgivable loan of up to five thousand dollars per year to Missouri's Bright Flight scholarship.

The president of the University of Missouri says he will go along with Gov. Jay Nixon’s request and recommend that tuition for the system’s four campuses not go up next year.

Tim Wolfe, who visited with junior and senior high school students in the Bayless School District in south St. Louis County Friday morning, said that the additional revenue proposed by Nixon in his State of the State address earlier this week should provide the four-campus system with the money it needs without raising tuition.

Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka, has been tapped to deliver the Republican response to next Tuesday’s State of the State address by Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat.

Jones had been on the short list for the response, usually delivered within minutes of the governor's annual speech. Others believed to be in the running had been Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder, who has delivered the response several times since Nixon took office, and state Auditor Tom Schweich, who’s running for re-election this fall.

Kellie Moore, ColumbiaFAVS.com

Hal Donaldson remembers the day well: It was August of 1969, and he was 12 years old. His parents were off to a business meeting, and Donaldson and his three siblings were home with a babysitter.

But his parents never made it to that meeting. On the way there, their car was hit by a drunk driver.

A policeman came to the house, and neighbors crowded around as the officer told Donaldson and his siblings the news: Their father had been killed, and their mother, severely injured.

Scott Harvey / KSMU

As state lawmakers convened in Jefferson City Wednesday for the first day of the 2014 session, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon called for the reauthorization of the Missouri Rx program during a stop in Springfield.

A new lawsuit seeks to compel Governor Jay Nixon to call special elections to fill four vacant legislative seats.

The lawsuit filed Thursday in Cole County claims Nixon is shirking his duties by not setting special elections.

The 120th House District has been vacant since June, when Republican Representative Jason Smith of Salem won a special election to Congress.

A series of hearings by state lawmakers into Missouri's Medicaid system has begun.

The showdown between Missouri's Democratic Governor and the Republican-led General Assembly finally arrives this week, as lawmakers return to Jefferson City for their annual veto session.  Governor Jay Nixon struck down 29 bills this year, with most of the post-veto attention falling on two bills in particular, a controversial tax cut proposal and an even more controversial attempt to nullify federal gun control laws.  St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin takes a look at what may or may not happen on Wednesday.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA file photo

Governor Jay Nixon says a clause in the income tax cut bill he vetoed could have triggered a $1.2 billion run on the state treasury because the cuts could apply retroactively to the last 3 years.

Attorney General Chris Koster agreed with Nixon's legal analysis this past week, as Republicans consider overriding the veto. But the dollar amount projection remains largely hypothetical.

The Missouri bill would trigger a one-half of a percent reduction in state income tax rates if the federal government enacts a measure making it easier for states to collect online sales taxes. That bill has stalled in the U.S. House.

Missouri River at Rocheport
File Photo / KBIA

Nearly a dozen Missouri agriculture groups sent a letter to Governor Jay Nixon this week calling for his support to oppose a dredging project in the Missouri River.

The project – near Arrow Rock, Missouri – was set up several years ago to create a shallow water habitat for several fish species including the pallid sturgeon – an endangered fish. Under the US Army Corps of Engineers plan, the soil excavated from the site would be deposited into the Missouri River.

Updated 8-21-13 4:01 p.m.

In St. Louis Wednesday, Gov. Jay Nixon sharply criticized a bill he vetoed that would allow juvenile sexual offenders to be removed from the sex offender registry. The Democratic Governor said overriding his veto would undermine public safety and weaken victims' rights.

He stood next to a gallery of mugshots and distributed information on several individuals who could be removed from the website if the bill passes.

Sedalia was swarming with politicians Thursday, as office holders from both parties descended on the Missouri State Fair.

Nearly a thousand people, politicians and citizens alike, dined on country ham, eggs and peaches at the Governor's Ham Breakfast.  Governor Jay Nixon began his annual speech by condemning the incident in which a rodeo clown wore a President Obama mask this weekend.

Photo provided by Miller County Emergency Management.

Gov. Jay Nixon toured parts of flood-ravaged south-central Missouri Thursday following days of heavy rains, which damaged dozens of homes and killed a young boy. 

Nixon praised the work of local organizations in their response efforts, including the Red Cross, whose Waynesville shelter housed 27 people Wednesday night. Nixon has called upon the Missouri National Guard for security and traffic control, as numerous streets have been closed, including sections of I-44 earlier this week.

Cerner, one of the largest employers in Kansas City, announced Thursday afternoon it intends to purchase about 237 acres at the site of the former Bannister Mall, which it hopes to use to build a new campus to house thousands of new employees.

The income tax bill that would eventually reduce income tax rates by about a half of a percent is likely to not be brought up in veto session next month, according to Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones (R-Eureka).

Appearing on St. Louis Public Radio's and the St. Louis Beacon's Politically Speaking podcast, Jones said he currently doesn't have the votes necessary for an override of the governor's veto.

thisisbossi / flickr

CertainTeed Corp. plans a new $100 million manufacturing and distribution center in the eastern Missouri town of Jonesburg, a facility expected to create 100 new jobs.

Expect to see a lot of ads leading up to September, paid for largely by one man. Libertarian Rex Sinquefield has given nearly $2.4 million to groups backing a possible cut to Missouri's income tax.

In response, Democratic Governor Jay Nixon has gone on the offensive, attacking the income tax bill and defending his veto.

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