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Emergency Response Centre International (Courtesy)

Back in 2015, the immigration crisis in Europe was in headlines all over the world. Since then the numbers of people crossing the by sea to the continent has declined from more than 1 million annually to just 126,000 through early September of this year, according to the U.N.'s migration agency. 

But many problems remain unresolved. Not least for the tens of thousands of migrants who arrived in Europe over the past few years and still find themselves in legal limbo. On this edition of Global Journalist, we look at Europe's tortured efforts to address the problem, and get an up close view at conditions for migrants in France and Greece. 


AP

For months now, the world has watched as more than a million refugees and migrants from countries like Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan have risked their lives to try and find safe haven in Europe.

But this influx has created enormous tensions in the European Union about how many newcomers to accept and which countries should take them. Governments in Sweden and Germany have each taken in hundreds of thousands of refugees and migrants–and taken criticism both from other European states and their own people.

So, who foots the bill for settling the hundreds of thousands of immigrants? And if no one, where will these people go?


Yannis Liakos / AP Photo

Greece's last two bailouts failed to rescue the country. This week, European leaders approved a new $95 billion package for the debt-stricken country. For Greeks, it means more tax hikes and cuts to pensions and other public spending–an option they soundly rejected in a nonbinding referendum in July. Still some argue that this bailout is different than the previous two – and that it may set the country on the path to recovery.

Updated at 10:30 p.m. ET

Greece's radical left Syriza party has become the first anti-austerity party to win elections in Europe, throwing into doubt whether the troubled country stays the course on an international austerity plan.

The party fell just short of an absolute majority, NPR's Joanna Kakissis reports for our newscast unit, and will have to work with another party to govern.

The debt crisis in the euro zone has put the financial markets of Italy, Spain and most recently France under pressure after the bailouts of Greece, Portugal and Ireland.

Much has been written about the economics of the eurozone crisis — the credit default swaps, financial haircuts and bank recapitalizations. To complicate matters more, hurdles, such as Greece's economic debacle and bailout request, will take longer than a week to rectify.