Gun Law

Last Thursday morning I opened my New York Times and choked on my coffee.  Once again Missouri was in the national news and not in a good way.  The lead editorial was a scathing critique of the Missouri legislature’s override of Governor Nixon’s veto of the change to the conceal-carry law.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

 Gun control advocates and gun rights supporters are fanning out through the Missouri Capitol, lobbying lawmakers on a bill that would allow most people to carry concealed weapons without needing permits.

Missouri lawmakers are to consider Wednesday whether to override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of the high-profile legislation.

The National Rifle Association set up shop in the Rotunda between the House and Senate and dispatched scores of volunteers to talk to lawmakers in support of the legislation. The organization distributed signs saying, "NRA. Stand and Fight."

Boonville is hoping a gun-making plant can boost its economy after a decade of manufacturing job losses. CMMG is seeking a $200,000 forgivable loan from Boonville so it can move its operations from rural Fayette, about a half an hour to the north. 

Gregory Wild Smith via Flickr

Like most sporting venues, Busch Stadium prohibits guns. Soon, gun-carrying Cardinals fans will have the option of leaving their weapon in an armored truck instead of their car.

Starting July 15, a company called Weapon Safe Armory will park an armored truck at a bar that sits in the shadow of Busch Stadium.

Owner Justin Hulsey, a National Guard veteran from Herculaneum, Missouri, outfitted a 22-foot-long vehicle with armor and security cameras, and hired guards to surround it when the vehicle is parked in public.

File Photo / KBIA

Governor Jay Nixon has vetoed a wide-ranging bill that would have rendered the conceal-carry process unnecessary in Missouri. In his veto message, Nixon, a Democrat, cited his record on signing bills to expand Missourians’ rights to carry concealed weapons. 

He said the bill passed by Republicans goes too far because it would entirely toss out the conceal-carry process and would have revoked the ability of sheriffs to deny permits to those they think might be a danger to their communities. 

File photo / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon says he'll veto a sweeping gun rights bill passed by the Republican-led Legislature.


The University of Missouri is countersuing a law school professor who has asked a court to invalidate the university's ban on firearms.

~Steve Z~ / flickr

A man has been charged with unlawful use of a weapon and child endangerment after police say he used a handgun as a hammer while working on a project at a southeast Missouri elementary school. / Flickr

KANSAS CITY, Kan. - Federal investigators are trying to determine how a Mexican national suspected of five shooting deaths in Kansas and Missouri acquired an assault-style rifle found on him when he was caught.

John Ham, a spokesman for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives office in Kansas City, said Wednesday that federal law barred Pablo Antonio Serrano-Vitorino from legally owning a gun because he is in the country illegally.

David Shane / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - A state senator running for attorney general wants Missouri to expand its "stand your ground" laws to make it easier for people to use deadly force in self-defense.

Sen. Kurt Schaefer told a senate panel Wednesday that people should be able to do whatever it takes to defend themselves without worrying about a lawsuit afterward.

Mika Jarvinen / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - Missouri lawmakers are considering whether to allow concealed weapons on public transit.

Republican Sen. Bob Onder told a Senate panel Wednesday that his proposal is about safety. He said public transit can be dangerous, and allowing people to carry concealed guns on buses and trains would deter crime.

Missouri Supreme Court
Americasroof / Wikimedia Commons

The Missouri Supreme Court says a recent amendment to the state constitution doesn't mean some felons now can carry guns.

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt was at Kansas City-based MRIGlobal Tuesday to talk about the importance of increased funding for the National Institutes of Health.

NIH received an additional $2 billion in the omnibus spending bill that passed last month, a funding increase of 6.6 percent.

That’s the biggest increase in a decade, although Blunt pointed out that wasn’t hard to accomplish “because there hadn’t been an increase in NIH funding since 2003,” when Congress made a commitment to double funding for health research.


A lawyer for a Missouri mother says a pawn shop was wrong to sell her mentally ill daughter a gun that was used in a fatal shooting.

Attorney Jonathan Lowy of the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence told Supreme Court judges Wednesday that Odessa Gun & Pawn was negligent.

Pawn shop lawyer Derek MacKay says state and federal laws protect firearms dealers from such claims. Lowy also challenged the constitutionality of a federal gun commerce law.


Two St. Louis-area men are facing federal indictment for their alleged roles in two drug-related killings, the latest indictment since this summer, when federal authorities were enlisted to help battle the growing crime problem in the region.

The indictments announced Wednesday accuse 27-year-old Terrance Wilson and 51-year-old Donald Stewart of two counts each of possession of a firearm with death resulting in furtherance of a drug-trafficking crime. Each could face up to life in prison if convicted.


Boone County authorities have requested more money to deal with the expenses of processing an increasing number of requests for concealed carry permits.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports applications for new concealed-carry weapon permits in Boone County are on pace to top previous highs.

University of Missouri

An MU Law School professor filed a lawsuit against the UM System Board of Curators Monday. 

Three nights a week, between the hours of 10 p.m. and 2 a.m., half a dozen St. Louis clergy members walk the streets in a line.

Led by Rev. Ken McKoy of the Progressive A.M.E Zion Church, they visit the Fountain Park and Lewis Place neighborhoods to act as a “ministry of presence,” as McKoy calls it. It’s a violence prevention effort that began on a grassroots level and is now on the cusp of expanding. McKoy calls it NightLIFE.

~Steve Z~ / flickr

The Missouri Supreme Court has ruled that a state constitutional amendment on gun rights does not allow convicted felons to possess firearms.

The Wingy / Flickr

A Missouri Republican lawmaker is taking the debate on gun rights to cities with a proposal to allow firearms on buses and trains.

Patrick Neville was a 15-year-old sophomore at Columbine High School in 1999. He was on his way to a fast food lunch when the shooting started.

Two students, armed with guns and pipe bombs, had stormed the Colorado school, on their way to killing one teacher and 12 students — some were Neville's friends.

Neville, now a Colorado state representative, says many of Columbine's teachers and faculty acted heroically that day.

But, he says, "I truly believe that had some of them had the legal authority to be armed, more of my friends might be with me today."

The Missouri Supreme Court will hear arguments next week on whether voters knew enough about a constitutional amendment expanding gun rights before it was approved in 2014. 

  Effective safe-driving campaigns and increase in suicides have pushed firearm deaths ahead of car crashes as the leading nonmedical cause of deaths in Missouri.

The Kansas City Star reports 880 people were killed by guns in Missouri in 2013, the most recent federal data available, while 781 died in car crashes.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

State representatives and other officials from Kansas and Missouri are announcing legislation aimed at reducing gun and domestic violence in both states. 

A new bill could mean new responsibilities for teachers

Oct 24, 2014
Gregory Wild Smith via Flickr

Due to a new Missouri law, teachers could be taking on a new responsibility.

Senate Bill 656 allows school districts to appoint staff members in the district to carry a concealed weapon for protection in case of an emergency. Only members of the district's Board of Education will know the names of these select individuals. The district must then notify the director of the department of Public Safety who these individuals are.

This law is not a required to be implemented in each district. It is strictly a district by district decision.

~Steve Z~ / flickr

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Republicans are clashing again with Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon on gun legislation.

A vote scheduled for Wednesday could overturn his veto of a bill allowing specially trained teachers to carry guns in school and other residents to openly carry firearms in cities.

Elvert Barnes / Flickr

The St. Louis police chief has promised a vigorous investigation after six apparently unrelated homicides in an 18-hour period and renewed his call for tougher gun crime penalties.