harvest

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media/KBIA

 

For the Midwest’s biggest crops, this harvest season was a big one. With winter setting in, the race is on for farmers to ship out their harvest so it’s not left out to spoil. But the giant harvest and a lack of available rail cars have created a traffic jam on the rails and the highways.

Usually, famers store their harvest in silos and grain bins, but this year, farmers brought in so much, there’s just no room.  Farmers in Missouri, Indiana, Illinois and South Dakota are all being hit particularly hard by the storage shortage.

Outer space
Sweetie187 / Flickr

On this week's Under the Microscope, we take a look at the junk we have left in space and a record-breaking harvest of corn and soybeans. 

U.S. farmers are bringing in what’s expected to be a record-breaking harvest for both corn and soybeans. But all that productivity has a big financial downside: plunging prices that have many Midwest farmers hoping to merely break-even on this year’s crop.

Fishhawk via Flickr

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says Missouri farmers are on track to harvest record crops of corn and soybeans.

In an updated forecast Tuesday, the agency predicted Missouri's corn production this year will total 533 million bushels — the highest on record for the state and a 22 percent increase from last year.

Yields are now forecast at 160 bushels of corn per acre. The USDA said that would be the highest since 2004, when Missouri producers averaged 162 bushels per acre.

Would you feed your family genetically modified food? Chances are, you already have.

On Thursday's Central Standard, the science behind genetically modified (GMO) and genetically engineered (GE) food. The guests:

Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

This past weekend, for the first time in 25 years, my dad and I visited our family’s farm in Woodhull, Ill.

By family, I mean extended family. Brothers Doug and Darwin Swanson — my dad’s first cousins — run the farm, which got its start with land bought in 1890 by my great-great grandfather, Swan Swanson, when he moved to Illinois from Sweden.