harvest public media

Business Beat: Govenors Back Beef Trimmings

Apr 6, 2012

This week: U.S. farmers made over 98 billion dollars last year, and consumers are upset about "lean beef trimmings," but governors are trying to diffuse the situation.

Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

This week: Another update in the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility, and climate changes doesn't ease troubles for farmers. 

Governors Back Beef Trimmings

Apr 4, 2012

By Sandhya Dirks

The consumer uproar over “pink slime” has now got the beef industry roaring back.

Harum Helmy / KBIA

How do consumers make decisions about what they consume? And, how are the various stakeholders attempting to shape those thoughts about food? Host Reuben Stern spoke with four experts with diverse views about the messages and motives behind these controversies in this special Intersection event, 

Sylvia Maria Gross / Harvest Public Media

On this week's show, we'll explore how some towns are dealing with poor access to affordable food. Plus, an interview with President Obama's principal environmental advisor.

Business Beat: February 29, 2012

Feb 29, 2012
Laura Ziegler / Harvest Public Media

This week: NBAF opponents are gaining strength in their fight against the Disease Laboratory.  Plus, the American Soybean Association is looking for fewer restrictions from the European Union on genetically modified soybeans.

Kevin Dooley / Flickr

The American Soybean Association is pushing for U.S. trade representatives to negotiate better trading terms with Europe, looking for the European Union to ease the strict restrictions it imposes on genetically modified soybeans. The group petitioned a U.S. trade representative who is part of a new working group with the European Union to work on its behalf. 

Laura Ziegler / Harvest Public Media

Opponents of a controversial Kansas lab designed to study and combat biological diseases have recently found new momentum, as work on the Department of Homeland Security project stalled.

Courtesy Department of Homeland Security

The White House budget for 2013 provides no construction funding for a planned livestock disease lab in Kansas and calls for a “comprehensive assessment of the project in 2012” to consider “the cost, safety, and any alternatives to the current plan.”

Business Beat: February 8, 2012

Feb 8, 2012
Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

This week: Farmers buying up grain bins to help play the market. Plus, how refineries in Kansas and Iowa could help find another source of bio fuel.

Recruiting doctors to live and work in rural America is a chronic problem. Most health centers try to attract workers with big salaries and expensive homes.

Shots previously reported that one center in Maine was trying to lure medical students to the countryside for their final two years with the hope that they stick around.

Jacob Fenston / Harvest Public Media

This week:  KBIA talks with William Barrett of Forbes on how the city of Columbia is in the top twenty places in the U.S. to come for a working retirement.  Plus, Missouri farmers are trying to protect themselves from "agritourism."

Technology and hands-on computer skills are important assets for most job seekers in today’s economy.

This week: KBIA spoke with a director of the center of Agro Forestry at the University of Missouri on why the state isn't using biomass as a renewable energy source. Plus, one company is hiring people with degrees you wouldn't expect.

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

The Food and Drug Administration is publishing an order this month that limits the way farmers can use certain antibiotics to treat animals, and eggs.

Vaughn Hammond / UNL Extension

This week:  Harvest Public Media speaks with a University of Nebraska Educator who just returned from Afghanistan where he helped teach Afghanis farming techniques, and the FDA is looking to change the way Cephalosporins are used for animals.  

Jessica Naudziunas / KBIA

If you've been to a Hy-Vee grocery store recently, chances are you've seen some numbers right next to the price of an item of food.

It's a "NuVal" - a nutritional value placed on each and every food product. 

Grant Gerlock/NET News

This week on the episode: fast food chains may soon be forced to disclose health information on their menus. Plus, a surging student population places pressure on the mental health counselors at the University of Missouri.

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

This week: Missouri could gain over two hundred thousand jobs by the 2025, and the Department of Labor proposed new regulations on kids working on the farm who are under 16.

Photo courtesy University of Illinois / Read more: http://bulletin.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=1569

This week: Rootworm is causing a headache for some farmers who thought they already had a fix for that problem. Plus, a university of Missouri study takes a look at the impact economic strains have on middle class families.

Sydney Miller / KBIA

This week, our stories have to do with two different controversies surrounding going underground.: a new quarry, and "fracking."

Struggling Infrastructure in the Midwest

Dec 15, 2011
Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

This week: we look at how diversity in Missouri can lead to better business and how struggling Midwest infrastructure can affect you at the grocery store.  

By: Nick Adams 

Remaking school lunches

Dec 8, 2011
Clay Masters / Harvest Public Media

This week on the show: your child's school lunches aren't likely to get much healthier anytime soon. Plus: why you should still get the flu vaccine.

Still farming despite disability

Dec 7, 2011
The Knowles Gallery / Flickr

Business Beat looks at economic and business news around mid-Missouri. Starting this week, we’re adding another voice into the mix. Business Beat will be a platform for weekly reporting from Harvest Public Media. Harvest is a network of reporters across  five states reporting on the topics of food, fuel and field.

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

This week on Exam, we take a look at Agriculture Education in Missouri. Plus, student athletes at Truman State University are being recognized for academic success.

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

According to a study from the Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, Americans consume a lot of meat, and the quality of the meat products is directly linked to animal feeding management. So, if you’re an average eater who chows down on over six ounces of meat daily, consider checking out the nutrition content on the animal feed label.

Sylvia Maria Gross / Harvest Public Media

Rural America is losing its grocery stores. Many parts of the United States, and large swaths of rural Missouri, are now classified as ‘food deserts’, areas where residents lack access to affordable food.

But as Harvest Public Media's Sylvia Maria Gross reports, some small towns are finding creative ways deal with the problem.

Plus: Nancy Sutley is President Obama’s principal environmental advisor and the Chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality.

Growing organic is the way to go

Nov 30, 2011

KBIA's Ryan Famuliner talks with Columbia Daily Tribune reporter Rudi Keller about the latest in the Mamtek hearing.  Plus, talk about a cash crop.  A recent study suggests organic crops could bring in more money per acre.

Hilary Stohs-Krause / NET

Demand for ‘alternatively raised meat’ seems like an opportunity for farmers in the Midwest. But it’s not a booming industry in the region just yet. Plus, an update on the effort to bring broadband internet to rural areas of Missouri.


Phillip Brasher, reporter for the Des Moines Register, reports that the failure of the congressional super committee to come up with a plan to reduce the federal budget deficit throws in doubt the future of federal crop subsidies after next year.