hb 253

File photo / KBIA

The Missouri House failed to override Governor Jay Nixon’s veto of a bill that proposed a variety of changes to the state tax codes.  Those changes included income tax cuts for both businesses and individuals.

Proponents said the bill would have improved the business climate of Missouri, while critics believed it would significantly lower the state’s general revenue fund, resulting in cuts to state agencies and education.

University of Missouri spokesperson John Fougere said the campus is supporting the veto.

Gov. Nixon visits Fairview Elementary

Sep 11, 2013
Tony Nochim / KBIA

Governor Jay Nixon visited Fairview Elementary in Columbia on Wednesday morning. Nixon went back to the school where his mother used to teach.

Nixon was at Fairview Elementary to applaud the academic success of the students.

“We put together a whole new kind of grade card called MSIP 5 and it’s designed to make sure that students are doing well in being challenged and takes it right down to each various school. Today, I’m proud to report that this school on a new grade card…scored 98.6 percent,” Nixon said.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

During the start of the legislature's veto session today, the Missouri House of Representatives failed to override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto on House Bill 253, a contentious bill that would have lowered income taxes. Critics of the bill alleged that the tax cuts would send the state into debt.

The vote had 94 votes in favor to 67 against, but 109 votes were needed to override the veto. As a result of the vote, the Senate will not consider overriding Gov. Nixon's veto.

The showdown between Missouri's Democratic Governor and the Republican-led General Assembly finally arrives this week, as lawmakers return to Jefferson City for their annual veto session.  Governor Jay Nixon struck down 29 bills this year, with most of the post-veto attention falling on two bills in particular, a controversial tax cut proposal and an even more controversial attempt to nullify federal gun control laws.  St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin takes a look at what may or may not happen on Wednesday.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA file photo

Governor Jay Nixon says a clause in the income tax cut bill he vetoed could have triggered a $1.2 billion run on the state treasury because the cuts could apply retroactively to the last 3 years.

Attorney General Chris Koster agreed with Nixon's legal analysis this past week, as Republicans consider overriding the veto. But the dollar amount projection remains largely hypothetical.

The Missouri bill would trigger a one-half of a percent reduction in state income tax rates if the federal government enacts a measure making it easier for states to collect online sales taxes. That bill has stalled in the U.S. House.

So far, there has not been a ground swell of support for the idea of a special legislative session in Missouri to pass an alternate version of the tax cut bill vetoed earlier this year by Governor Jay Nixon (D).

missouri house floor
File Photo / KBIA News

A conservative Missouri political committee says it may recruit candidates to run in primary elections against Republican legislators who vote against an income tax cut.

Ed Schipul / Flickr

Texas Gov. Rick Perry is launching an ad campaign in which he asks Missouri workers and employers to consider moving to Texas.

Nixon opposes new and increased license fees

Aug 20, 2013
jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

In the first of what may be several visits to highlight his many other vetoes from this summer, Gov. Jay Nixon told reporters in Springfield that he opposes $22 million in new and increased license fees on Missourians.

Nixon was referring to SB 51, which modifies provisions related to the regulation of motor vehicles. The bill, vetoed on June 26, was one of 29 struck down by the Governor.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

www.timwjones.com

Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones is rallying support for an effort to override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of an income-tax cut bill.

Jones, a Republican, says reducing taxes would grow the economy and allow more funding for education. Nixon, a Democrat, says the tax cut would jeopardize funding for government services and boost taxes on prescription drugs.

House Republicans are meeting this week to discuss possible veto overrides. Missouri lawmakers return to the state Capitol on Sept. 11. Speaking in Fulton on Tuesday, Jones said he sees "momentum" on his side. 

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

A new report by the Department of Mental Health, or DMH, found the department would have to cut 87 million dollars annually. Federal matching funds would also be lost, which brings that number to approximately $164 million per year.

Speaking at the Autism Center for Diagnosis and Treatment at Southeast Missouri State University, Nixon said that would permanently undermine the state’s ability to fund mental health services.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA file photo

Gov. Jay Nixon stopped by Columbia twice this week. He has spent his summer drawing attention to the many problems he and other critics see with House Bill 253. That is the income-tax cut bill he vetoed in June. There is a chance state Republicans could make a run for an override of that bill in September. The bill cuts income tax and corporate taxes and under certain circumstances allows business taxes to be claimed on personal income taxes. Conservative estimates peg a state revenue loss of $692 million dollars if the bill were to become law.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Gov. Jay Nixon continued stumping across the state discouraging state lawmakers from overriding his veto on a tax cut bill.

At the University of Missouri Columbia campus Wednesday, Nixon said the bill could result in a funding slash of $67 million per year for the state’s higher education institutions. The University of Missouri system alone stands to lose $31 million per year. And if a federal online sales tax bill passes, the state number jumps up to a cut of $116 million annually.

Jay Nixon
File Photo / KBIA

With two stops in mid-Missouri Tuesday, Gov. Jay Nixon continued his campaign against a Republican-sponsored bill that would cut the corporate and individual income tax rates. Nixon vetoed the bill earlier this summer. 

Nixon addressed Missouri school leaders in Columbia Tuesday at a conference hosted by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.  The governor used the venue to continue speaking against a bill that would cut taxes in the state.

The income tax bill that would eventually reduce income tax rates by about a half of a percent is likely to not be brought up in veto session next month, according to Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones (R-Eureka).

Appearing on St. Louis Public Radio's and the St. Louis Beacon's Politically Speaking podcast, Jones said he currently doesn't have the votes necessary for an override of the governor's veto.

This week Como Explained dives into the tax cut bill the Governor vetoed. It's not dead yet.

We’ve talked about the Republican veto-proof majority on this show before. Well, that’s one of the main causes behind a situation playing out in Jefferson City (and across the state) right now.

Republicans pushed a bill through the legislature this year that would reduce the personal income tax rate by half a percentage point and the corporate rate by three points.  Both would be phased in over the next 10 years. Many Republicans touted the bill as one of their key accomplishments in the 2013 session, and if it becomes law, it will likely be the most noticeable change in the state that comes out of this past session.