Health

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Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says the state now has a designated Ebola testing lab approved by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Courtesy NBC

NBC Cheif Medical Editor, Dr. Nancy Snyderman, broke her voluntary Ebola quarantine to go get takeout from her favorite restaurant. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss NBC’s released statement on the issue and weigh in on whether Snyderman should have personally apologized for the incident. ​

Updated at 8:43 p.m. ET

A second health care worker who has tested positive for the Ebola virus was airlifted from a Dallas hospital, where she became infected, to Emory University hospital in Atlanta for continued treatment on Wednesday.

Dr. Thomas Frieden, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says Amber Vinson, whom public records indicate is a nurse in Dallas, is "clinically stable" and that she was "quickly isolated" after her first test for Ebola came back positive on Tuesday.

KBIA file photo

    

  The University of Missouri Health System and Columbia Surgical Associates announced their partnership to expand health care options for patients in Mid-Missouri.

President and senior partner of Columbia Surgical Associates Walter Peters said the collaboration will give CSA patients more choices for where they can receive care. He said this new affiliation will also help CSA improve its quality of performance for patients.

pills
images_of_money / flickr

The Missouri Department of Insurance is offering free help to seniors who want to review their coverage or enroll in Medicare.

Open enrollment for the federal health insurance program for anyone aged 65 and over runs Oct. 15 through Dec. 7.

Those who want to review their current plan, change their drug coverage or enroll can meet in person or talk on the phone with the state's Community Leaders Assisting the Insured of Missouri program.

Army veteran Randy Michaud had to make a 200-mile trip to the Veterans Affairs hospital in Aroostook County, Maine, near the Canadian border, every time he had a medical appointment.

Michaud, who was medically retired after a jeep accident in Germany 25 years ago, moved home to Maine in 1991. He was eligible for VA medical care, but the long drive was a problem.

He's one of millions of veterans living in rural America who must travel hundreds of miles round-trip for care.

A health care worker in Texas who cared for Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan has been confirmed to have the virus, according to the Centers for Disease Control. The head of the CDC says the infection stems from a breach in protocol that officials are working to identify.

Citizens share views on tobacco proposal

Oct 10, 2014

Members of the public shared their views on the Columbia City Council’s proposals to change certain tobacco ordinances Thursday.

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

  

Matt Gibbens has been riding all-terrain vehicles, or ATVs, for a long time, but he’s never taken a safety course.

“I know there's a lot of them out there but I've just grown up on them,” Gibbens said.

Gibbens grew up on a farm and said he’s used ATVs for both work and play. But despite his experience with the machine, he’s still dressed from head to toe in protective gear, including a helmet, goggles, and chest protector.

Gibbens said he thinks about safety every time he gets on his ATV.

Ozarks Red Cross / Flickr

The Holts Summit community and the American Red Cross are assisting the residents of the Evergreen Apartment complex after a fire last Friday.

“We’ve been meeting their immediate needs with some funds to buy food and clothing since most of them lost everything in the fire,” said American Red Cross Disaster Specialist Kath Mayne.

In what's being hailed as a huge step in fertility and reproduction science, doctors in Sweden say a woman has given birth to a baby boy less than two years after she received a uterus transplant. The new mother, 36, had been born without a uterus, so another woman, 61, donated her womb several years after she had gone through menopause.

This is the fifth story in a series from the Health & Wealth desk on Healthy Nevada. 

All this week we’ve been talking about the population health experiment that the health technology company Cerner is conducting in the town of Nevada, Missouri. But there are still a lot of unanswered questions. Will Cerner’s message and grassroots approach resonate with people in this rural community? Can small changes like new playground equipment and a community garden really have an impact on Nevada’s poor health rankings? And, more simply, will this program work?

To help forecast what may come from Cerner’s efforts in Nevada, I spoke with Dr. Keith Mueller, the Director of the Rural Policy Research Institute at the Center for Rural Health Policy Analysis. 

Amylovesyah / Flickr

 

MU's School of Veterinary Medicine is in the research phase with bacteria and molecules that could change the treatment of cancer. 

This is the fourth story in a series from the Health & Wealth desk on Healthy Nevada

The TV show “Parks and Recreation” chronicles civic life in the small fictional town of Pawnee, Indiana. Rural Pawnee is depicted with broad brushstrokes for comedic effect – ordinary town hall meetings frequently turn violent over small issues, soft drinks come in outrageously huge sizes, and a dedicated idealistic city hall employee named Leslie Knope will stop at nothing to help her community.

But in Nevada, Missouri, that parody of a rural town isn’t too far from the truth, right on down to that idealistic, dedicated civic leader.

Greg Riegler / Flickr

Around 1950, cities in the U.S began adding fluoride to the water supply as a way to reduce tooth decay. And ever since, water fluoridation has been a debated issue. Despite evidence that fluoride treatment is beneficial to oral health, the town of Waynesville, Mo. recently voted to stop adding fluoride to its water system. 

But ending water fluoridation in Waynesville didn’t involve activists, budget cuts or a heated debate.

This is the third story in a series from the Health & Wealth desk on Healthy Nevada

Dr. Kristi Crymes is a family medicine doctor at the Nevada Medical Clinic. Crymes came up from Springfield three years ago to work in Vernon County, which has some of the state’s poorest health rankings. In 2010 the obesity rate in Vernon County was 30 percent. The incidence of adult diabetes has hung around 11 percent for the past 3 years. 

This is the second story in a series from the Health & Wealth desk on Healthy Nevada

The town of Nevada, in southwest Missouri, is changing in very subtle ways. To see it you really need to know where to look. For example, Walton Park, on Atlantic Street, used to be one of the town’s less popular parks for kids – just a small slide, a merry-go-round, and two swings. But today Walton Park is where all the cool six-year-olds go, thanks to one new piece of playground equipment.  

Local pond rated a high potential hazard by the EPA

Sep 30, 2014
Power Plant towers
KBIA

Citizens of Columbia need to be extra cautious near a local pond the next time it rains heavily.

This is the first story in a series from the Health & Wealth desk on Healthy Nevada

Pookie Decocq is the healthy living coordinator for the YMCA in Nevada, Missouri. She’s also the town’s official Pickleball Ambassador, which is a team sport played with two wooden paddles, a whiffleball and a low net, like ping pong or badminton.

Pookie’s dream is to hold a pickleball tournament here in this rural town in southwest Missouri. But the average Nevada resident isn’t exactly the picture of health. Like a lot of small rural towns in the state, Nevada has very high rates of obesity and heart disease. Its diabetes rates are some of the highest in the country at 11 percent.

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Jennifer Brdar’s dream job was to be a meat inspector for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, watching out for unwary consumers and making sure the meat on their dinner tables was clean and disease-free.

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

  Mizzou student Alex Talleur volunteers at the Community Garden at Kilgore’s Medical Pharmacy in Columbia.

As Talleur pulled green, prickly cucumbers from the yellowing vines, he said he’s envious of the kids who will be munching on the fresh produce in a few days.

"When I think of schools or anything like that, I always think of the greasy cafeteria food," Talleur said. "Having an opportunity to have really healthy, homegrown food is really great."

lake of the ozarks
bsabarnowl / flickr

After an ongoing 10 year process, residents of the Lake of the Ozarks may finally get a central sewer system.

COD Newsroom / Flickr

  

Primary health care is no longer limited to the family doctor. With the growing popularity of clinics like the new Mizzou Quick Care, nurse practitioners are becoming more involved in providing primary care.

cigarette
Sudipto_Sarkar / flickr

The “idea” of a new anti-smoking ordinance was introduced at a Columbia city council meeting Monday.

Michael Cote / flickr

A respiratory illness is sending hundreds of kids to hospitals in ten states, including Missouri.  

Jonny Williams / Flickr

Of the numerous items Missouri legislators will consider during this veto session, Senate Bill 841 has state health advocates paying attention. The bill's main purpose was to ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors. But these good intentions may have led lawmakers astray.

Women and Children's hospital
File Photo / KBIA

The University of Missouri Children's Hospital has performed screening tests on children who they suspect may have Enterovirus 68.

Missouri home care attendants demand higher wages

Sep 9, 2014
Rosemary / Flickr

The Missouri Home Care Union has quite the battle ahead of it. Union members are requesting wages for home care attendants be raised to $11 an hour.  Attendants are responsible for assisting elderly individuals and people with physical disabilities.

A rarely seen virus is sending children to the hospital with severe respiratory infections, and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning doctors and parents to be on the alert.

"Hospitalizations are higher than would be expected at this time of year," Dr. Anne Schuchat, head of infectious diseases for the CDC, said Monday at a press briefing on enterovirus 68. "The situation is evolving quickly."

Hey Paul Studios via Flickr

The nurse who was walking across part of Missouri announced this morning that she will not be continuing her walk.

Sherry Payne posted on her organization’s Facebook page that the RV she was using in her trek from Clinton to Augusta was hit in Jefferson City on Sunday night. While the driver of the other car is still unknown, Jefferson City Police Department confirmed that there were no injuries in the crash.

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