Health


Obesity is the number one public health issue in Missouri – it affects more than 30% of adults and nearly one in seven children between the ages of ten and seventeen.

by LarimdaME /Flickr Creative Commons

As Thanksgiving approaches, organizers of Almeta Crayton’s annual Thanksgiving Day meal are seeking donations.

Kentrell Minton said the demand for turkeys this year is greater than it’s ever been in the organization’s 17 years in Columbia.

“I think the economy definitely took a toll on the community,” Minton said.

Every year, the organization delivers Thanksgiving baskets to the elderly and disabled as well as hosts a free dinner on Thanksgiving Day for the community.

  

The Healthcare Equality Index is a national benchmarking tool that ranks hospitals based on whether their policies and practices include equal treatment for the LGBT community. Missouri’s standing in this index jumped from 37th  in the nation to 6th in just one year.

I spoke with Andrew Shaughnessy, Public Policy Manager of the Missouri LGBT advocacy organization PROMO, about why this ranking is so important and what it means for Missouri. 

    

stethoscope
vitualis / Flickr

Missouri health advocates are trying to encourage more minorities and rural residents to sign up for insurance through a federally run website.

glenn beck
The Blaze

Conservative talk show host Glenn Beck told fans that for the past few years, he’s been suffering from a mysterious neurological illness. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Fink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.


Obesity is the number one public health issue in Missouri – it affects more than 30% of adults and nearly one in seven children between the ages of ten and seventeen. But in order to solve the problem of obesity in Missouri, we need to first understand why it exists. Intersection host Ryan Famuliner will lead the discussion of some of the physical, cultural, and even political events that have brought on what is considered by many to be a public health crisis in our state. 

Join us this Tuesday at 7pm for “Missouri: State of Obesity,” a live taping of KBIA’s talk show Intersection. 

Columbia Housing Authority is asking for public comment about a new smoke-free policy for its units. 

LGBT, pride
nathanmac87 / Flickr


  Last month, the Human Rights Campaign called on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to address LGBT discrimination in healthcare.

Sarah Warbelow is the Legal Director for the Human Rights Campaign, a national LGBT advocacy organization. She said many LGBT individuals are hesitant to seek care based on a history of discrimination by healthcare providers.

nomadsoul1 / dreamstime

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Some Missouri residents could have more choices but also see higher costs when enrollment begins for health insurance plans offered through a federally run website.

Open enrollment starts Saturday for people wanting to purchase insurance for 2015 through HealthCare.gov, which offers subsidized coverage under the federal health care law.

KBIA

COLUMBIA – The City of Columbia will switch its water disinfection process from chlorine to chloramine this week. Columbia Water and Light used the chlorine disinfection method until August 2009 when the water was tested and exceeded the maximum contaminant level.

Columbia’s Water Production Superintendent Ed Fisher said the city will add ammonia to its chlorinated water to stop the formulation of disinfection by-products like high levels of trihalomethanes (THMs).

receipt
Brad Montgomery / Flickr

It’s a well known fact that fast food contributes to poor overall health. But what about the receipt that comes with those yummy French fries?

I sat down with MU researcher Dr. Fredrick vom Saal, whose recently published work shows how fast food receipts expose us to a dangerous endocrine disrupting chemical called BPA.


These days, Americans are all about eating local foods. But one important local crop drops to the ground mostly unnoticed every fall. Well, unless you're a squirrel. Yes, we're talking about acorns.

Although acorns don't get the love that hazelnuts and walnuts enjoy, this wasn't always the case. Bill Logan is an arborist in New York, who traced the history of eating acorns for his book Oak: The Frame of Civilization.

farmer
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr

 

 

 

When people think of the United States Department of Agriculture, they of course think about things related to agriculture - farms, crops, livestock.

But Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack said the USDA is about much more than that. It’s really about improving the quality of life in rural areas.  

“It's important I think because of the people who live in rural America and the contributions they make to the rest of the country," Vilsack said.

A careful examination of frozen caribou poop has turned up two never-before-seen viruses.

The viruses are hundreds of years old: One of them probably infected plants the caribous ate. The other may have infected insects that buzzed around the animals.

The findings prove viruses can survive for surprisingly long periods of time in a cold environment, according to Eric Delwart, a researcher at Blood Systems Research Institute in San Francisco.

hospital room
jodimarr / Flickr

A Missouri board has approved a bond issuance to finance a new mental health facility at the Fulton State Hospital.

University of Missouri Health Care

  When cleaning your house do you ever wish a robot was there to do it for you? Well, the University of Missouri health care system has that luxury. 

Women's Foundation

In partnership with the Institute of Public Policy at MU, the Women’s Foundation of Kansas City is collecting information about Missouri women for a public database, including things like income and employment, education, childcare and health.  I spoke with Wendy Doyle, President and CEO of the Women’s Foundation, about how the project could have an impact on women's issues in Missouri.

Courtesy NIAID

The Associated Press has said it won't be reporting every instance in which an individual is tested for Ebola. The goal of the media should not be to create undue fear among the population. How much of the reporting out there is helpful, how much is creating panic? Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Koster aims to ban Ebola waste at St. Louis center

Oct 17, 2014
ebola treatment
Kjell Gunnar Beraas, MSF / AP Photo

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster is seeking to block a sterilization company from handling any medical waste contaminated with Ebola at its St. Louis facility.

david_shane / Flickr

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says the state now has a designated Ebola testing lab approved by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Courtesy NBC

NBC Cheif Medical Editor, Dr. Nancy Snyderman, broke her voluntary Ebola quarantine to go get takeout from her favorite restaurant. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss NBC’s released statement on the issue and weigh in on whether Snyderman should have personally apologized for the incident. ​

Updated at 8:43 p.m. ET

A second health care worker who has tested positive for the Ebola virus was airlifted from a Dallas hospital, where she became infected, to Emory University hospital in Atlanta for continued treatment on Wednesday.

Dr. Thomas Frieden, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says Amber Vinson, whom public records indicate is a nurse in Dallas, is "clinically stable" and that she was "quickly isolated" after her first test for Ebola came back positive on Tuesday.

KBIA file photo

    

  The University of Missouri Health System and Columbia Surgical Associates announced their partnership to expand health care options for patients in Mid-Missouri.

President and senior partner of Columbia Surgical Associates Walter Peters said the collaboration will give CSA patients more choices for where they can receive care. He said this new affiliation will also help CSA improve its quality of performance for patients.

pills
images_of_money / flickr

The Missouri Department of Insurance is offering free help to seniors who want to review their coverage or enroll in Medicare.

Open enrollment for the federal health insurance program for anyone aged 65 and over runs Oct. 15 through Dec. 7.

Those who want to review their current plan, change their drug coverage or enroll can meet in person or talk on the phone with the state's Community Leaders Assisting the Insured of Missouri program.

Army veteran Randy Michaud had to make a 200-mile trip to the Veterans Affairs hospital in Aroostook County, Maine, near the Canadian border, every time he had a medical appointment.

Michaud, who was medically retired after a jeep accident in Germany 25 years ago, moved home to Maine in 1991. He was eligible for VA medical care, but the long drive was a problem.

He's one of millions of veterans living in rural America who must travel hundreds of miles round-trip for care.

A health care worker in Texas who cared for Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan has been confirmed to have the virus, according to the Centers for Disease Control. The head of the CDC says the infection stems from a breach in protocol that officials are working to identify.

Citizens share views on tobacco proposal

Oct 10, 2014

Members of the public shared their views on the Columbia City Council’s proposals to change certain tobacco ordinances Thursday.

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

  

Matt Gibbens has been riding all-terrain vehicles, or ATVs, for a long time, but he’s never taken a safety course.

“I know there's a lot of them out there but I've just grown up on them,” Gibbens said.

Gibbens grew up on a farm and said he’s used ATVs for both work and play. But despite his experience with the machine, he’s still dressed from head to toe in protective gear, including a helmet, goggles, and chest protector.

Gibbens said he thinks about safety every time he gets on his ATV.

Ozarks Red Cross / Flickr

The Holts Summit community and the American Red Cross are assisting the residents of the Evergreen Apartment complex after a fire last Friday.

“We’ve been meeting their immediate needs with some funds to buy food and clothing since most of them lost everything in the fire,” said American Red Cross Disaster Specialist Kath Mayne.

In what's being hailed as a huge step in fertility and reproduction science, doctors in Sweden say a woman has given birth to a baby boy less than two years after she received a uterus transplant. The new mother, 36, had been born without a uterus, so another woman, 61, donated her womb several years after she had gone through menopause.

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