health care exchange

Compiled by Kelsey Proud, St. Louis Public Radio / Flickr

The number of Missouri residents using a federal website to enroll in health insurance is growing, but not as fast as had been projected.

A report issued Tuesday by the federal Department of Health and Human Services found that almost 200,000 Latinos in Missouri may have new options for health coverage. The report says they might qualify for Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or for lower costs on premiums  through the Health Insurance Marketplace. 43,000 of the eligible Missouri Latinos are currently uninsured, the report says.

Aaron Swaney, outreach and enrollment specialist at the Family Health Center, said the center does have a sizable portion of patients who are uninsured and Latino.

Missouri Capitol
david shane / flickr

Legislation requiring health insurance navigators to take an exam and undergo a background check is advancing in the state Legislature.

Senators also voted Tuesday to move forward with a measure that would let people collect up to $50,000 in a lawsuit if a navigator unlawfully releases personal information about a client.

Navigators help consumers sign up for health plans on the exchange marketplace.

Some health care advocates are suing the state of Missouri over legal limits on the counselors enlisted to help consumers navigate the new online health insurance marketplace.

A new Missouri law requires insurance counselors to get state licenses to help online shoppers negotiate the federal insurance exchange. Missouri's Republican-led Legislature opted against setting up a state-run exchange.

Affordable Care Act
whitehouse.gov / whitehouse.gov

The wait is over for Missourians hoping to find out whether the Affordable Care Act lives up to its name when it comes to shopping for government-backed health insurance.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

On this week's episode, we'll hear why some rural residents are reluctant to sign up for insurance under the Affordable Care Act.

Jay Nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is continuing to push for a Medicaid expansion, but he's open to alternatives that could use federal money to buy private insurance for lower-income adults.

steakpinball / Wikimedia Commons

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster apparently has decided not to appeal a judge's decision rewriting the summary that voters will see for a ballot measure on health insurance exchanges.

Arguments were heard Friday on whether a temporary restraining order should be issued against Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan over language she approved for a ballot initiative regarding health care exchanges. Lt. Governor Peter Kinder and Republican lawmakers say the initiative is designed to block the governor from creating an exchange by executive order.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

The idea of a health care exchange in Missouri continues to be a political sticking point between Republicans and Democrats. And Missouri Governor Jay Nixon has yet to take a stance on the issue.

The day after Republican Lt. Governor Peter Kinder filed a lawsuit that alleges the wording for a healthcare exchange ballot initiative is misleading; Governor Jay Nixon did his best to sidestep the issue.

In fact, Nixon says he hasn’t really looked at how the ballot measure is written. As for the idea of healthcare exchanges in general, the governor isn’t ready to commit.

Missouri Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder is filing a lawsuit to challenge the ballot summary for a measure restricting the creation of a state health insurance exchange without specific approval from lawmakers or voters.

KBIA file photo

Missouri Lt. Governor Peter Kinder is once again filing suit against a health care measure. He and some other Republican lawmakers have announced plans to challenge the secretary of state’s office on newly issued ballot language for a health care measure that’s slated to appear on the November ballot.

Missouri lawmakers continue debating bills in the closing minutes of the 2012 regular session.

Among the bills passed so far today is one that would require legislative approval before a health care exchange can be created in Missouri.  State Rep. Ryan Silvey (R, Kansas City) accused Governor Jay Nixon (D) of trying last year to create an exchange via executive order.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

The use of twenty seven million dollars in federal funds to help create a health insurance exchange in Missouri has come to a complete halt. 

By Elana Gordon, KCUR.

Newscast for December 6, 2011

Dec 6, 2011

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • Missouri legislatures question proposed statewide health care exchange
  • Columbia City Council approves gender protection ordinance
  • The season's first snowfall causes problems for mid-Missouri drivers
  • UM Board of Curators continues search for next UM System president

Senators Get an Earful on Health Reform

Nov 11, 2011
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri state senators listened to over 3 hours of impassioned testimony on health care reform yesterday. The hearing was supposed to be on the rather mundane question of whether Missouri should set up an online health care exchange starting in 2014, or let the federal government do so. But the hearing quickly became a forum for debating the merits of health reform itself. After the jump, two interviews with senators on the committee: a Democrat representing one of the state's most liberal districts, and a Republican who has been at the forefront of Missouri's pushback against "Obamacare."

Political Points vs. Sound Policy?

Nov 4, 2011
governor.ks.gov

Republican lawmakers in red states are in a pickle. The Affordable Care Act requires each state to set up a health care exchange designed to bring down insurance costs for consumers. Republicans want no part of anything related to Obama's health care reform law, which they see as a federal intrusion on states rights. But if state lawmakers don't set up an exchange, the federal government will. In September, Republican senators in Missouri prevented the state from accepting $21 million of federal money to lay the groundwork for an exchange. Next door, the Sunflower State is in a similar quandary, reports Bryan Thompson of Kansas Public Radio.

A few months ago, Kansas seemed ahead of the game in preparing for an important requirement of the federal health law. The state had started to plan for exchanges — online marketplaces to help individuals and small businesses compare and buy health insurance.

But politics is intervening.

Health Care Exchanges Spark Clash

Sep 16, 2011

A Missouri Senate committee heard testimony Thursday on the health care exchanges mandated by the Affordable Care Act. The legislature must either create an exchange or let the federal government do so. Republicans on the committee clashed with Governor Jay Nixon’s administration.