Hijab

Those who listened to NPR's coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign regularly heard the dispatches from political reporter Asma Khalid.

During the race, Khalid distinguished herself for her ability to blend voter interviews with the use of data to illustrate Americans shifting political views.

But as a Muslim woman who wears the hijab, or Islamic headscarf, the Indiana native was also tested by then-candidate Donald Trump's divisive rhetoric, and was mocked on Twitter as a "terrorist," "raghead," and "jihadi." On occasion, the reporting climate was so volatile Khalid says she felt the need to remove her head covering. 

On this special edition of Global Journalist, Khalid, now with Boston public radio station WBUR and a 2017 recipient of the Missouri School of Journalism's highest award, opens up about her experiences with guest host Joshua Kranzberg.


AP Photo

Since France banned women from wearing veils that covered the face in public in 2011, a growing number of European nations have passed similar restrictions.

Belgium, Bulgaria and Austria have passed similar so-called "burqa bans," while Germany, Switzerland, Norway and other countries are considering such legislation.

The laws have sparked a public debate about religious freedom, feminism and xenophobia. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how Europe's courts, legislators and public are grappling with the debate about the meaning of Islamic dress in Western societies.


Torie Ross / KBIA

A former University of Missouri graduate teaching assistant is accused of grabbing a teenage family member by the hair and pulling her out of school because she wasn't wearing a traditional headscarf worn by some Muslim women.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports 53-year-old Youssif Omar was arrested Wednesday at his home on suspicion of felony child abuse. He was released from the Boone County Jail after posting $4,500 bond.