income tax cuts

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Officials from Missouri's public universities are raising concerns about reduced revenues for education as state lawmakers consider an income tax cut.

A statement signed by the governing board presidents of nine state universities cites concerns that legislation could limit the money available for education.

Although the letter does not specifically mention the proposed income tax cut, the executive director of the Council on Public Higher Education said that is the subject of the concerns.

The Missouri Senate has begun debate on a compromise tax cut brokered last month between Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, and state Sen. Will Kraus, R-Lee's Summit.

Missouri Capitol
File Photo / KBIA

Every homeowner in Missouri could get a one-time tax refund under legislation pending in the state Senate.

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

Missouri House members have endorsed the first change in Missouri's income tax brackets since the Great Depression.

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to two separate but similar tax-cut bills.

(Updated 12:45 p.m. Fri., Feb. 14)

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has unveiled a tentative deal for a tax-cut package made with some Republicans in the state Senate, but his requirements could delay when -- or if -- the cuts go into effect.

Debate has begun in the Missouri Senate on this year's attempt to cut the state's income tax rate.

KBIA file photo

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has no plans to call a special legislative session to craft a new version of a bill cutting income taxes.

Nixon spokesman Scott Holste said today that trying to put together a new bill at the last moment would be an irresponsible approach to a complex issue.

Nixon vetoed a bill earlier this year that would cut income taxes. Lawmakers are to convene Sept. 11 to consider overriding that veto.

Expect to see a lot of ads leading up to September, paid for largely by one man. Libertarian Rex Sinquefield has given nearly $2.4 million to groups backing a possible cut to Missouri's income tax.

In response, Democratic Governor Jay Nixon has gone on the offensive, attacking the income tax bill and defending his veto.

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon's record number of vetoes this year is expected to set up a very busy and hard-fought veto session this September.

According to the Associated Press, the Democratic Governor struck down 29 of the 145 non-budgetary bills sent to him by the Republican-dominated House and Senate.  Dave Robertson is a political science professor at the University of Missouri – St. Louis.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

  Missouri’s state budget for the fiscal year that begins Monday has been signed into law, but Gov. Jay Nixon also announced that he will withhold more than 400 million dollars in funding for several state needs.  He told reporters Friday that the tentative cuts would become permanent if Republican lawmakers override his veto of their tax cut bill.  Budget Director Linda Luebbering says Nixon's cuts includes cancelling pay raises for state workers as well as eliminating state jobs.

Updated 5:02 p.m. May 31

Newly released emails show that Gov. Jay Nixon's administration and legislative bill drafters each had a role in crafting an apparently inadvertent tax increase on prescription medications.

The prescription tax hike is included in a bill passed by the Legislature that cuts the state's income tax. Nixon has indicated he may veto the bill.


A proposal to cut state income taxes in Missouri for both individuals and businesses is on its way to Governor Jay Nixon (D).

The Missouri Senate has passed legislation phasing in a potential $700 million income tax cut for businesses and individuals.

The legislation approved 24-9 Wednesday by the Republican-led Senate is intended to counteract a large income tax cut that took effect this year in Kansas. The bill now goes to the House.

It would gradually cut the individual income tax by one-half of a percentage point and the corporate income tax by three percentage points over a decade. But each incremental cut would take effect only if annual revenues rise by at least $100 million.

File Photo / KBIA

Legislation that would cut Missouri’s income tax while raising the sales tax was examined today by a State House committee. 

File / KBIA

Gov. Jay Nixon is increasing his opposition to Senate legislation that would cut Missouri's income tax and raise the state sales tax.