ISIS

Updated at 4:45 p.m. ET

The White House has confirmed that a video released by the self-declared Islamic State that shows the beheading of hostage Peter Kassig, an American aid worker in Syria who was kidnapped in 2013, is authentic.

The radical jihadist group posted the video on social media early Sunday.

President Obama said in a statement that he offered his condolences to the family, describing the beheading as "an act of pure evil."

The psychology of foreign jihadis

Oct 9, 2014
foreign-jihad
Sherin Zada / AP Photo

This week on Global Journalist, we look, once again, at the Islamic State and the ongoing fighting in the Middle East. Recent videos from the militant group have featured people not from the West fighting for ISIS' cause. To that point, videos depicting the beheading of American journalists and a British aid worker have highlighted a British person who describes what ISIS is fighting for before he executes the group's captives. But what makes someone who was born in the west and was educated in the west decide to fight for a group that wants to destroy the west?

Update at 8:50 p.m. EDT

The militant group that calls itself the Islamic State has released a video that purportedly shows the beheading of British aid worker David Haines.

The authenticity of the video, which appeared online Saturday, has not been independently confirmed by NPR.

freejamesfoley.org

The militant Jihadist group ISIS released video of the beheading of journalist James Foley in retaliation, it says, for the U.S. air strikes in Iraq. Foley went missing on Thanksgiving day, 2012, in Syria. In the video Foley is kneeling against a desert landscape, wearing something resembling an orange prison jump suit.  ISIS is threatening to kill another journalist they are holding if air strikes do not stop. Has the role journalists play in war zones changed? Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry, and Amy Simons discuss. 

  As the violence escalates in Iraq at the hands of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), there's a steady stream of hawkish pundits on television talking about the need to act.  What do Paul Wolfowitz, Paul Bremer, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) have to say today that's different than prior to the 2003 invasion of Iraq? Missouri School of Journalism professors Margaret Duffy, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

ISIS wreaks havoc in Iraq

Jun 19, 2014
ISIS-in-iraq
Emad Matti / AP Photo

    

This week on Global Journalist, we look at the increasing turmoil in the MIddle East. The group known as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, has taken control of two of Iraq's major cities and is moving toward the capital. In Syria, it controls much of the northern part of the country. We'll talk to those covering the conflict about the challenges thereof. We also take a look at free press in Afghanistan. Our guests:

As the U.S. steers warships closer to Iraq and beefs up its embassy's security in Baghdad with nearly 300 troops, a nagging question has resurfaced.

What compelling interests does Washington still have in a nation where all U.S. forces were pulled out 2 1/2 years ago?

Three days after Sunni militants calling themselves the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria seized Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city, President Obama paused on the White House lawn and issued a warning.

As the violence escalates in Iraq at the hands of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), there's a steady stream of hawkish pundits on television talking about the need to act.  What to Paul Wolfowitz, Paul Bremer, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) have to say today that's different than prior to the 2003 invasion of Iraq?

Jack Mirkinson, Huffington Post: “Iraq hawks are still dominating the media debate

President Obama has informed Congress that 275 U.S. Armed Forces personnel will go to Iraq to provide security for the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad, as a militant Sunni group continues its offensive in the country, seizing control of the northern town of Tal Afar.