Jim Flink

  Jake Gyllenhaal's character in the new movie 'Nightcrawler,' makes a name for himself shooting videos of crime scenes and selling them to news channels...but how much of that happens in real life? Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Flink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

glenn beck
The Blaze

Conservative talk show host Glenn Beck told fans that for the past few years, he’s been suffering from a mysterious neurological illness. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Fink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.


#Pointergate

Nov 13, 2014

KSTP-TV accused the Minneapolis Mayor of throwing up gang signs after she was photographed with a black constituent. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Fink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

    

 President Barack Obama challenges the FCC to regulate the internet service providers as it would a utility.  A win for net neutrality advocates and businesses such as Netflix and Hulu or a long-shot wish put upon an independent agency? Conservative talk show host Glenn Beck reveals he is suffering from a rare illness that has “quite honestly, made me look crazy.” Stephen Glass breaks his silence. And, how close to reality is Jake Gyllenhaal’s new flim Nightcrawler? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jim Flink and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.

 

Wikimedia Commons / wikimedia commons

President Barack Obama told the FCC he thinks it's time the independent agency acts on net neutrality, and regulate the Internet and service providers like other utilities.  It's uncertain how the FCC will act -- but Obama's request is being viewed as a "win" for consumers and businesses such as Netflix and Hulu and a blow to big telecom companies like Comcast and Verizon.

Matthew Yglesias, Vox: “Obama says FCC should reclassify the Internet’s regulatory status

Last week, the National Association of Black Journalists issued a press release citing concern with the atmosphere and working conditions for African-Americans at the cable network. CNN responded by saying it was reconsidering its sponsorship of NABJ events. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Remembering Ben Bradlee

Oct 22, 2014
via Flickr user Miguel Ariel Contreras Drake-McLaughlin

 Ben Bradlee, former top editor at the Washington Post, died at his Washington, D.C. home Tuesday. He was 93 years old. Bradlee ran the paper for more than 26 years, taking over in 1965, and transforming it into one of the nation's strongest daily newspapers of record. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Gov. Jay Nixon announces the creation of the Ferguson Commission to study the social and education conditions that led to the shooting death of Michael Brown. Why is the governor doing this now? Also, how the media covered the Keene, New Hampshire Pumpkin Fest unrest, a battle between the National Association of Black Journalists and CNN, the Associated Press runs advertising through its Twitter account and claims a gubernatorial candidate sidelined a political reporter. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

KBIA file photo

Gov. Jay Nixon announced a plan to create a Ferguson Commission on Tuesday.  The newly-formed panel is charged with studying the social and economic conditions that led to the August shooting death of unarmed teen Michael Brown.

Why is Nixon doing this now? How might the timing be influenced by a New York Times report detailing leaks of evidence presented to the grand jury investigating the case that supports Officer Darren Wilson's recollection of events?

    The Ebola outbreak hits American soil.  A photojournalist working for NBC News is treated for the illness while his colleagues are in a self-imposed quarantine.  Did the Liberian man doctors diagnosed in Dallas have an expectation of privacy? Or should the media have broadcast his name far and wide?    Daily Show alum John Oliver says he’s not a journalist, but many journalists disagree. Find out why his brand of investigative reporting is getting the industry’s attention. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jim Flink and Jamie Greber: Views of the News.

Courtesy NIAID

The diagnoses of two high-profile cases of Ebola have changed how the media is covering the viral outbreak in the United States. 

A freelance photojournalist working for NBC News said he started to feel symptoms a few days after joining the crew.  He's back in the United States, and his prognosis is reportedly good.  His colleagues -- NBC employees -- are home, too, in self-quarantined for a period of 21 days.

  Comments are as much a part of news websites as articles, photos and video.  But, this content isn’t vetted, isn’t edited, and sometimes isn’t even read prior to publication. While many news organizations say they’re committed to giving the audience a voice, they find themselves struggling to do that while upholding their editorial standards. How do you keep the trolls from invading your news site’s smart, open dialogue? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink: a special edition of Views of the News.


via Twitter

Comments are as much a part of news websites as articles, photos and video.  But, this content isn’t vetted, isn’t edited, and sometimes isn’t even read prior to publication. While many news organizations say they’re committed to giving the audience a voice, they find themselves struggling to do that while upholding their editorial standards.

The psychology of web trolling

A group of minority journalists are fighting to bring more diversity to American newsrooms, journalism conferences, panels and classrooms. The Journalism Diversity Project is designed to make it easy for hiring managers and event organizers to find qualified experts who are journalists of color. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss. 

Police in Ferguson, Missouri shot and killed an unarmed teen.  Was race a factor in the death of Michael Brown? Or has the framing of the story by local and national journalists made it one?  Also, keeping reporters safe during violent protests, the role of citizen journalists and hashtag activism in the aftermath. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jim Flink: Views of the News.


Courtesy CNN

A police officer Ferguson, Missouri fatally shot an unarmed teen.  Was race a factor in the death of Michael Brown? Or has the framing of the story by local and national journalists made it one?  Also, keeping reporters safe during violent protests, the role of citizen journalists and hashag activism in the aftermath.

JR / Flickr

The gaffe came during a discussion with New York Times columnist Jim Stewart, who was on "Squawk Box" talking about his piece dealing with corporate culture and gay executives. Co-anchor Simon Hobbs commented on what he believed to be public information, and turned out to be the opposite.  Missouri School of Journalism professors Amanda Hinnant, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

The first-ever gay pride event at Fort Leonard Wood: Is it newsworthy or not?  When you know your local readership isn’t likely to respond to the story does that mean you skip covering it? Also, Matt Lauer accused of sexism, a Facebook experiment preys on your emotions, and whether a relatively common television news practice is standard operating procedure or plagiarism. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Amanda Hinnant and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

  

U.S. Army photo

On Monday, the first-ever gay pride event was held on post at Fort Leonard Wood. Command Sgt. Major Teresa King spoke at a luncheon about her journey coming out and living openly as a gay soldier in the U.S. Army.

Some would say that this is news. It's not that long ago that such an event on an military post would have been illegal. Others say there are diversity events held all the time celebrating one group or another, and it deserved no more coverage than those do.

C-SPAN

  Last week there was lots of talk about a hearing in which Dr. Mehmet Oz met his match in U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.). She's the chair of the Consumer Protection Committee.  Oz went before the committee to testify on the marketing of "miracle" weight loss cures. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Flink, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

thierry ehrmann / Flickr

  Journalists around the globe are decrying an Egyptian court's decision to imprison three Al Jazeera English journalists on charges of making false news reports and aiding terrorists. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Flink, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

jasonwhat / Flickr

Bigger than baseball?

With ratings for Sunday's U.S.A-Portugal game tipping in at just more than 24 million television viewers, it's probably safe to say World Cup fever has swept the nation.  ESPN reports more than 18 million tuned in to its main, English-language broadcast -- an audience bigger than single games of both the World Series and the NBA finals.

A big week in legal news, as the U.S. Supreme Court decides on the Aereo case, verdicts are announced in the News of the World phone-hacking scandal and three Al Jazeera journalists are sentenced to more than seven years in an Egyptian prison. Also, Sen. Claire McCaskill takes on Dr. Oz, the St. Louis-Post Dispatch drops George Will, and hottest felon ever? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

via Jeff Weisbien

The Supreme Court of the United States found in favor of major broadcasters, and against Aereo, in a case over the streaming of copyrighted material on the Internet.

Jordan Crook, Tech Crunch: "Aereo loses in Supreme Court, deemed illegal"

Katy Bachman, POLITICO: "Aereo loses copyright fight at Supreme Court"

When a minor is charged with a heinous crime

Jun 7, 2014
ABC7 Chicago

  Prosecutors say two 12-year-old southeastern Wisconsin girls stabbed their 12-year-old friend nearly to death in the woods to please a mythological creature they learned about online. The girls have been charged as adults. Should the media publish their names and show their faces in its coverage? Missouri School of Journalism faculty Amy Simons, Lynda Kraxberger and Jim Flink discuss the issue.

Marcus Qwertyus / Wikimedia Commons

  The Columbia Missourian announced it is dropping its paywall revenue model, replacing it with a new survey model. Readers will be able to access content -- and share it on social media -- after taking a short Google survey. Missouri School of Journalism faculty Amy Simons, Lynda Kraxberger and Jim Flink discuss the issue.

The complicated story of Bowe Bergdahl's release

Jun 6, 2014
U.S. Army Photo

  On Saturday, May 31, President Barack Obama stood on the White House lawn flanked by Bergdahl's parents, to annnounce his release. Since then, the story has taken several twists and turns. Missouri School of Journalism faculty Amy Simons, Lynda Kraxberger and Jim Flink discuss the issue.

Hero or deserter? Negotiating with terrorists? The story of Bowe Bergdahl’s release has taken several twists since President Obama’s announcement Saturday afternoon.  Also, how young is too young when showing images of children facing adult criminal charges, a CNN reporter arrested on live television, and remembering Tiananmen Square 25 years later. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Lynda Kraxberger and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

U.S. Army photo

It was 2009 when Army Pfc. Bowe Bergdahl was captured and held as a prisoner of war in Afghanistan.  Saturday, President Barack Obama stood on the White House lawn flanked by Bergdahl's parents, to annnounce his release.

The Taliban freed Bergdahl as part of a prisoner swap.  In exchange for his release, the U.S. government agreed to release five prisoners from Guantanamo Bay.

Many news organizations ran Eliott Rodger's YouTube video as part of their coverage of the Isla Vista shootings. How is that different than publishing a suicide note? Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss the national and local media's response. 

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