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Kansas City Public Library officials are questioning the arrests of an employee and a patron during a library event.

Jeremy Rothe-Kushel, of Lawrence, was asking a question of Dennis Ross, an author and diplomat, who had just delivered a presentation at the library's Plaza branch in May. Rothe-Kushel asked if Jewish Americans, like himself, should be concerned about actions by the U.S. and Israel that amount to "state-sponsored terrorism."

At hundreds of libraries across the U.S., 3-D printers can sometimes be heard whirring in the background, part of an effort to encourage interest in the new technology and foster DIY "maker spaces."

In some libraries, officials have begun to set restrictions on the 3-D printers amid concerns about how they'll be used.

At the University City Public Library in St. Louis, Patrick Wall recently printed a green plastic sword from the game Minecraft.

Banned Books Week kicks off Sunday: Each year, the American Library Association takes this week to sponsor events all over the country to talk about the books that shock, offend and generally make Americans uncomfortable.

Violence and curse words are two of the top three reasons books get banned in the U.S.

The third reason is sexual content. For example, the Fifty Shades of Grey series has been frequently banned from libraries for its explicit descriptions of intercourse.

Digital privacy bills waiting for Nixon's approval

May 28, 2014

A bill that would keep information about those who check out e-books or other digital resources private is headed to Gov. Jay Nixon's desk.   

It also makes it so any third party involved with library records must disclose information of those people who use the libraries' facilities. Many of these third parties provide electronic services to libraries.

E-books and other digital resources would be considered "library materials." Other traditional materials are already covered by this type of protection.