Mexico

After Iguala, what's next for Mexico?

Dec 4, 2014
mexico-protest
Eduardo Verdugo / AP Photo

Earlier this year, you may have heard of an incident in a small city in Mexico, where a group of 43 teaching students disappeared. The men who vanished in September were studying at a rural college called Ayotzinapa Normal School. On September 26, more than 100 students from the school had been protesting teacher hiring practices and funding for teachers’ colleges in the nearby city of Iguala. This week on Global Journalist, we look at the investigation, and what effect the disappearances have had in Mexico. Our guests:

The Mexican town of Tequila in the western state of Jalisco is the heart of a region that produces the legendary spirit. Any bottle of tequila must be made from the Weber Blue species of agave, grown and distilled in this region.

Field after field of agave gives this land a blue hue, defining an economy and its traditions.

Impunity prevails in Mexico's drug war

Sep 19, 2013
Associated Press

Covering crime and corruption in Mexico may be the most dangerous job in the world of journalism. On average, 10 journalists have been killed every year since 2006. And attacks on the media have increased since a new president took office nine months ago.

Officials have identified an employee who died in an accident at one of Home Depot's subsidiaries in central Missouri.

Brice Mesko, an assistant safety director in Mexico, Mo., says 30-year-old Kenny Baker of Auxvasse died Tuesday while trying to repair a loading dock plate at Home Decorators, a distribution center.

Alexandre Meneghini / AP Images

A new president is about to take power in Mexico amid a raging drug war. The biggest question facing Enrique Pena Nieto is this: what will the federal government do to curtail the gangland violence?

Conversations about reestablishing service on the 27-mile rail line between Mexico and Fulton have been ongoing for the past decade. The line has been out of service since the late 1990’s when it failed to generate enough business to stay running. In 2007 the project became more feasible when new owner Mike Williams showed an interest in developing the line. President of the Fulton Area Development Corporation Bruce Hackmann says progress has been made but many details of the project remain unsolved.

Marshall Griffin / KWMU

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Thousands gathering for rallies in Jefferson City
  • A jobs announcement in Mexico, MO
  • The stealth bombers at a Missouri Air Force Base are getting some expensive updates

Mexico auto parts manufacturer plans to add jobs

Mar 27, 2012
Addison Walton / KBIA

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon was in Mexico Tuesday to announce more job creation in the state.

Mexico ambulance service postponed

Mar 23, 2012
PMC1stPix / flickr

An ambulance service in Mexico has halted construction on a new building because of what it is calling unfit infrastructure.  

Military Academy names new president

Mar 16, 2012
Missouri Military Academy

The Missouri Military Academy in Mexico, Mo. has a new president. The school’s board of directors named Tony McGeorge to the position, and he will begin the job in July.

Mexico’s DREAM Initiative is continuing to make a difference in the downtown community.