migration

Emergency Response Centre International (Courtesy)

Back in 2015, the immigration crisis in Europe was in headlines all over the world. Since then the numbers of people crossing the by sea to the continent has declined from more than 1 million annually to just 126,000 through early September of this year, according to the U.N.'s migration agency. 

But many problems remain unresolved. Not least for the tens of thousands of migrants who arrived in Europe over the past few years and still find themselves in legal limbo. On this edition of Global Journalist, we look at Europe's tortured efforts to address the problem, and get an up close view at conditions for migrants in France and Greece. 


Guardia Costiera / Associated Press

Hundreds of desperate refugees from North Africa drowned this month after their overcrowded boats sank in the Mediterranean. This past weekend there was another close call. More than 700 migrants traveling in five boats were rescued off the coast of Sicily by the Italian navy and coastguard. The European Union’s border agency says about 30,000 migrants have arrived in Italy from Africa during the first nine months of this year. That’s three times higher than the migration for all 12 months of 2012.

davidyuweb / flickr

Ecologists in Kansas and Missouri say extreme temperatures are killing a large number of butterflies and could hurt their southern migration next month.

Millions of monarch butterflies are expected to migrate south through the two states in less than a month in their seasonal trip from Canada to Mexico.

KSHB-TV reports the Powell Botanical Gardens annual butterfly festival east of Kansas City is seeing the lowest number of monarchs in a decade.

Dragonflies migrate out of Missouri

Aug 2, 2012
Jacob McCleland / KRCU

Migratory dragonflies are leaving Missouri and Illinois for areas further south. It’s part of these great travelers' annual migration pattern.

The Wandering Glider and Spot-winged dragonfly typically pass through the region in July. By early August, they are on their way out.

Bob Gillespie is a natural history biologist at the Missouri Department of Conservation. He says, up until a few year ago, scientists knew very little about how they migrate.

Photo courtesy of UC Press

The magnitude of China’s urban migration can be hard to fathom when you hear the numbers.