Mike McKean

  Are the CIA’s enhanced interrogation techniques torture? Former Vice President Dick Cheney gives Chuck Todd his definition of “torture” on Meet the Press. The Cosbys break their silence, MSNBC launches “The Shift” to test new programming online, and New York Magazine is duped by a high school student. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

Courtesy NBC

When former Vice President Dick Cheney appeared on Meet the Press Sunday, he told moderator Chuck Todd that he approved of the CIA's interrogation techniques -- and said he'd use them all again "in a minute."

Some say those enhanced interrogation techniques, including water boarding and rectal rehydration amount to torture. 

The release of the Senate's CIA interrogation report left many in the media wondering what terminology to use.

IMDB

The film, The Immitation Game, carries a PG-13 rating and The New York Times warns the film contains illicit sex, cataclysmic violence & advanced math?! Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

 


via Flickr user Gordon Correll

Comedian Chris Rock is on a publicity tour, promoting his new film Top Five. In multiple interviews Rock is asked about his reactions to the recent events in Ferguson and his take on racism in America. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Janay Rice speaks out

Dec 4, 2014
via Flickr user mdennes

On Friday, former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice won his appeal. A judge ruled the NFL’s indefinite suspension against him be vacated. In the wake of this news, ESPN released an essay written by Rice’s wife, Janay, who became a public figure after a video of an altercation between the two was leaked to the media. ESPN said no questions were off limits but final control over the essay and its publication was left up to Janay. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.


Chris Rock tells New York magazine that white people are “less crazy than they used to be.” Why the actor-comedian’s remarks about race, Ferguson and President Obama are giving many reasons for pause. Janay Rice steadfastly stands behind her husband in interviews with ESPN and NBC, evidence suggests North Korea could be behind a computer hack that resulted in the leak of several new Sony Pictures movies, and why a New York Times movie review might have you thinking of math in a new light. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Gordon Correll

Comedian Chris Rock has been talking to reporters, doing a publicity tour for his new film, Top Five.  The timing has resulting in several questions about Ferguson,  the grand jury's decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson, the coverage of race in America, and the Obama presidency.

Frank Rick, New York: “In Conversation Chris Rock: What’s killing comedy. What’s saving America.

http://www.9jumpin.com.au/

  Karl Stefanovic, the anchor of Australia’s Today Show, wanted to see if anyone would notice if he wore the same blue suit for a year. No one noticed! Meanwhile, if his co-host wore the same outfit more than once a week, she got critical emails and calls from viewers. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

An executive of the app-based ride-sharing company, unhappy with critical media coverage, suggested it should dig up personal information about journalists and make it public. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

NPR’s Scott Simon asked Bill Cosby some pointed questions about allegations waged against him, but were the questions about sexual assault allegations or something else?  An Uber executive unhappy about media coverage looks to dig up dirt on unfriendly journalists, the Orange County Register looks to reporters to take on paper delivery routes and why an Australian television anchor’s decision to wear the same suit every day for a year is earning him high praise from feminists. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

NPR's Scott Simon had the first interview with actor-comedian Bill Cosby following the recent allegations of sexual assault against him.  Simon asked Cosby on Saturday Weekend Edition if he wanted to address those allegations.  

KBIA

Access Missouri is a collaboration between KBIA, The Missouri Informatics Institute and The Truman School of Public Affairs here at MU. The site is a portal designed to collect publicly available data on Lawmakers. So far there have been more than 5,000 unique users, on the site that launched less than a week ago. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

  KBIA and the University of Missouri announced plans to buy KWWC.  The lower-power FM station is currently owned by Stephens College.  Pending FCC approval, the new frequency will carry classical music around the clock while KBIA will switch to an all-news format from 4 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the purchase.

  Did the police call for a no-fly zone over Ferguson to keep the media out?  Find out what's on the Federal Aviation Administration recordings released by the Associated Press.  KBIA announces plans to go all-news all day with the purchase of another FM frequency, analysis of the midterm election coverage and a tribute to Car Talk’s Tom Magliozzi. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Austin Federa / KBIA

Over the weekend, the Associated Press published a report based on recordings it obtained that make it appear the no-fly zone established over Ferguson, Missouri was aimed at keeping the media out.

Jack Gillum & Joan Lowy, Associated Press: “AP Exclusive: Ferguson no-fly zone aimed at media

KBIA

  Last week, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch misquoted forensic expert, Dr. Judy Melinek's interpretation of Michael Brown’s autopsy. The Post-Dispatch stood by their original report until yesterday when it added an editor's note to the story saying Dr. Melinek wanted to clarify her statements. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

  Were a forensic expert’s opinions taken out of context in the reporting of the findings of Michael Brown’s autopsy? Nearly a week after publication, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch printed a clarification of Dr. Judy Melinek’s interpretation of the report. Documents show the FBI co-opted the Seattle Times website to capture a teen suspected of bomb threats at a high school, why pressure from a gubernatorial candidate led to a Chicago Sun-Times reporter’s resignation and what sets apart breaking news coverage in Canada. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

KBIA

Were a forensic expert’s opinions taken out of context in the reporting of the findings of Michael Brown’s autopsy? Nearly a week after publication, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch printed a clarification of Dr. Judy Melinek’s interpretation of the report.

CitizenFour

Laura Poitras' documentary, CitizenFour, will screen in Columbian, Mo. on Sunday in conjunction with True/False. The film documents NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden's meetings with journalists from the Guardian in a Hong Kong hotel room. Early reviews of the film are strong, and already there's Oscar talk buzzing around it.​ Could this film change public perception? Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss. 

Courtesy NIAID

The Associated Press has said it won't be reporting every instance in which an individual is tested for Ebola. The goal of the media should not be to create undue fear among the population. How much of the reporting out there is helpful, how much is creating panic? Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Courtesy NBC

NBC Cheif Medical Editor, Dr. Nancy Snyderman, broke her voluntary Ebola quarantine to go get takeout from her favorite restaurant. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss NBC’s released statement on the issue and weigh in on whether Snyderman should have personally apologized for the incident. ​

Do you want to know about every person tested for Ebola or hear about every airline passenger with a fever? Has the media’s attempts to localize the Ebola epidemic gone too far, resulting in the reporting of “non-stories?” New Jersey puts NBC Medical Editor Dr. Nancy Synderman under a mandatory quarantine after she was spotted picking up soup from her favorite restaurant. Speculation swirls after North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un reappears after 40 days without a trace and the New York Times says it’s time to end the trade embargo against Cuba – in Spanish. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy NBC

NBC Medical Editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman and the team she worked with in Liberia are now under a mandatory quarantine ordered by the New Jersey Health Department.

On last week's Views of the News, we talked about how Synderman was self-monitoring and in isolation after being exposed to Ebola by cameraman Ashoka Mukpo.

Courtesy WMC-TV

    If we're being honest, we laugh at people on television who accidentally say curse words, or reporters and photographers who have to react quickly before a bad situation gets worse. But, we rarely know the story behind the story. Here's one of those. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

    The pressure is on for big-name NFL advertisers, like CoverGirl cosmetics, to pull their ad dollars after the Ray Rice domestic abuse scandal. How has the news media contributed to the discussion? Should companies pull ads? Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

    

  Advertisers are starting to feel pressure to drop their NFL sponsorships in light of how the league is handling domestic abuse cases. What role has the news media played in that?  Also, the Columbia Missourian fact-checks the “Mizzou Made” commercial, and some emotional moments in local television news. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

There is pressure on the big-name sponsors of the National Football League to pull their advertising dollars in the aftermath of the domestic abuse scandal.  The public has joined the chant, calling attention to Cover Girl cosmetics (left) for its "Game Face" campaign, using manipulated images of made-up women with bruises on their face.  How has the news media contributed to the discussion?

Meet The Press / NBC

A visibly-nervous Chuck Todd took over last Sunday morning as the moderator of NBC's flagship political program, "Meet the Press." With the show having previously experienced a drop in ratings many wonder if audiences are over Sunday morning talk shows -- or if Todd has the power to turn things around. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Fox & Friends / Fox News

More than six months ago, a hotel surveillance camera caught Ray Rice beating his now-wife unconscious in an elevator. After TMZ released the surveillance footage on Monday, the Baltimore Ravens cut Rice from the team within hours and the NFL suspended him indefinitely. “Fox & Friends” co-hosts responded to the video with comments including “she still married him” and “the message is, when you're in an elevator, there's a camera." Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Travis McMillen

  

    

  More than six months ago, a hotel surveillance camera caught Ray Rice beating his now-wife unconscious in an elevator. For months the NFL was criticized by activists, reporters and columnists for only having suspended him from the first two regular season games. But after TMZ released the surveillance footage on Monday, the Baltimore Ravens cut Rice from the team within hours and the NFL suspended him indefinitely.Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

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