Mike McKean

What does it mean when President Donald Trump only calls on reporters from publications owned by buddy Rupert Murdoch? And, the next day, calls on two more from right-leaning organizations?

Jim Rutenberg, New York Times: “When a pillar of the fourth estate rests on a Trump-Murdoch axis

Did journalists really fail to report on more than 75 terror attacks like President Trump claims? Or, is he exaggerating to cover up for an advisor’s comments about the non-existent Bowling Green “massacre?” Also, Bill O’Reilly’s reaction to criticism from the Kremlin, how fake news is creating a chilling effect on satirists, and what to expect from Snapchat after its parent company goes public. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Did journalists really fail to report on more than 75 terror attacks like President Trump claims? Or, is he exaggerating to cover up for an advisor’s comments about the non-existent Bowling Green “massacre?”

Mark Hensch & Jordan Fabian: “White House lists terror attacks it claims media ignored

Reporters were working overtime this weekend, covering the fallout from President Trump’s executive order limiting travel from seven countries. Also, journalists’ response to Steve Bannon’s call to keep its mouth shut and listen more, how George Orwell’s 1984 became required reading outside the high school literature classes and our memories of Mary Tyler Moore. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Reporters were working overtime this weekend, covering the fallout from President Trump’s executive order limiting travel from seven countries.

Evan Perez, Pamela Brown & Kevin Liptak, CNN: “Inside the confusion of the Trump executive order and travel ban

Alternative facts. A slip of the tongue? Or just one more symbol of the relationship between the reporters and the Trump administration? Also, what’s behind a directive to workers at some federal agencies to cut communication with Congress, reporters and public, why newsroom staffers across the country get marching orders to stay home from the Women’s Marches held across the country, and a look at this year’s Oscar nominations.

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy: NBC News

Alternate facts. A slip of the tongue? Or just one more symbol of the relationship between the reporters and the Trump administration?

The world will be watching as President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office Friday. Among the big issues we’re keeping an eye on: what his relationship will be with journalists. We got a glimpse of it during last week’s news conference, in which he lashed out at CNN’s Jim Acosta. Is that the new normal? Also, Facebook’s newest effort to filter fake news, the ice storm that wasn’t, and 65 years of morning television. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, John Fennell and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

The world will be watching as President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office Friday. Among the big issues we’re keeping an eye on: what his relationship will be with journalists. We got a glimpse of it during last week’s news conference, in which he lashed out at CNN’s Jim Acosta. Is that the new normal?

News broke on Tuesday that Megyn Kelly would be leaving Fox News for NBC News in a deal reportedly worth upwards of $20 million per year. This week on Views of the News, our panel will discuss if her new role is worth the investment. Also, Don Lemon partied extra hard during CNN’s New Year’s Eve coverage – will it have lasting damage? And what role will fake news play in 2017 after Trump becomes president? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel: Views of the News.

How do journalists ring in the New Year?  Megyn Kelly announced she was moving from Fox News to NBC.  CNN's Don Lemon rivaled Mariah Carey for most embarrassing moment by getting progressively more drunk on live TV.  A Washington Post reporter chronicled the death threats he received for his aggressive coverage of Donald Trump.  And lots of us talked about how we could cover the president-elect and other big stories with more clarity and purpose in 2017.  Meanwhile, some big brands tackled Islamophobia in new video ads.

Megyn Kelly says goodbye to Fox News

Name a magazine you think would be most likely to write an op-ed taking down President-Elect Donald Trump. The Atlantic? Time? U.S. News and World Report? Nope. Try Teen Vogue. This week on Views of the News, we talk about the sharp piece outlining the ways Trump used gaslighting techniques to win over his voter base. Also, Trump’s on-going role on NBC’s Celebrity Apprentice, reading the tea leaves on media cross-ownership and a look at a generation of children growing up on YouTube. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Via Flickr user Hanbyul

Name a magazine you think would be most likely to write an op-ed taking down President-Elect Donald Trump. The Atlantic? Time? U.S. News and World Report? Nope. Try Teen Vogue. This week on Views of the News, we talk about the sharp piece outlining the ways Trump used gaslighting techniques to win over his voter base.

Lauren Duca, Teen Vogue: “Donald Trump is gaslighting America

More than 35 people died in Friday night’s Oakland, Calif. warehouse fire. A distraught Derick Almena, the building’s landlord, appeared on The Today Show Tuesday hoping to apologize to the public. But, the interview took a quick turn when the co-hosts asked some pointed questions. Were they too hard on him? Or, where they asking the same questions investigators would likely ask? Also, the impact of fake news on private citizens, a CNN field producer is caught on tape making inappropriate jokes about President-elect Donald Trump. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy: NBC News

More than 35 people died in Friday night’s Oakland, Calif. warehouse fire. A distraught Derick Almena, the building’s landlord, appeared on The Today Show Tuesday hoping to apologize to the public. But, the interview took a quick turn when the co-hosts asked some pointed questions. Were they too hard on him? Or, where they asking the same questions investigators would likely ask?

What’s a journalist to do with the president-elect tweets baseless accusations about the validity of the election? This week, we’ll talk about how different national media outlets framed Donald Trump’s tweets about the Wisconsin recount, baseless accusations of voter fraud in three other states and citizens’ right to burn the U.S. flag. Also, covering the death Fidel Castro and some pretty shallow coverage of the standoff at the Standing Rock Reservation. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

What’s a journalist to do with the president-elect tweets baseless accusations about the validity of the election? This week, we’ll talk about how different national media outlets framed Donald Trump’s tweets about the Wisconsin recount, baseless accusations of voter fraud in three other states and citizens’ right to burn the U.S. flag.

We’re learning the names of some of President-elect Trump’s first appointments. How should the news media cover those? And, when do you use terms like “alt-right” versus “white nationalist?” Also, Mark Zuckerberg’s response to the notion the spread of fake news on Facebook affected the outcome of the election, nonprofit news organizations see a rush of donations, and the death of Gwen Ifill. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy CBS

We’re learning the names of some of President-elect Trump’s first appointments. How should the news media cover those? And, when do you use terms like “alt-right” versus “white nationalist?”

Leslie Stahl, 60 Minutes: “President-elect Trump speaks to a divided country on 60 Minutes

Forget the pollsters, forget the prognosticators, forget the pundits.

They were all wrong.

Now that the election is behind us, our panel breaks down what happened in America’s newsrooms – how the coverage came together and where so many natural storylines were dropped. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

After a few tough weeks for Donald Trump and his campaign, we’ll look at a few issues that have put a thorn in Hillary Clinton’s side. Also, the exchange between Megyn Kelly and Newt Gingrich, Gannett drops its bid for Tronc, racist advertising practices on Facebook and the end of Twitter’s Vine. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Advertising on Facebook? You have the option to target your ad to reach the audience YOU want to reach. But, what happens when your choices could constitute breaking the law?

Julia Angwin & Terry Parris, Jr., ProPublica: “Facebook lets advertisers exclude users by race

Gillian B. White, The Atlantic: “How Facebook’s ad tool fails to protect civil rights

The closer we get to Election Day, the hotter the rhetoric gets. We rely on our news media to cut through the clutter and put it all into context. But, where do the opinions end and the true reporting begin?

We’re less than three weeks from the presidential election and the rhetoric is getting hotter by the day. On this week’s program, our panelists will analyze the long-term effects of the “Access Hollywood” tape, how endorsements and predictions might influence the electorate, and why Donald Trump wants Saturday Night Live off the air. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Rod Gelatt and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user justgrimes

We’re less than three weeks from the presidential election and the rhetoric is getting hotter by the day. On this week’s program, our panelists will analyze the long-term effects of the “Access Hollywood” tape, how endorsements and predictions might influence the electorate, and why Donald Trump wants Saturday Night Live off the air.

The New York Times: “The New York Times lawyer responds to Donald Trump

Come Saturday, Columbia’s afternoon newspaper, The Columbia Daily Tribune, will have a corporate owner, ending 115 years of local, family ownership. Why did the Waters family sell to GateHouse Media? And, what might the change mean for those who work there and those who have relied on it as their local news source for generations? Also, we’ll break down the first presidential debate, the coverage, the focus on fact-checking and Lester Holt’s performance as moderator. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Photo by Amy Simons (KBIA)

Come Saturday, Columbia’s afternoon newspaper, The Columbia Daily Tribune, will have a corporate owner, ending 115 years of local, family ownership. Why did the Waters family sell to GateHouse Media? And, what might the change mean for those who work there and those who have relied on it as their local news source for generations?

The Washington Post makes history, being the first publication to call for the prosecution of a key source. Why is the paper’s editorial board turning its back on NSA leaker Edward Snowden? Also, have we seen the end of the birther movement, Megyn Kelly’s new role of producer,and how a journalist’s skills could be used to teach life skills.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy Prixas Films via Wikimedia Commons

The Washington Post makes history, being the first publication to call for the prosecution of a key source. Why is the paper’s editorial board turning its back on NSA leaker Edward Snowden?

It's been two months since former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson filed her sexual harassment suit against Roger Ailes and Fox News. Now, the network has announced a settlement – and it’s disclosing the details. Also, what’s the role of a debate moderator and the shortest story in the history of the New York Times. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

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